The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for EMCMS-LAW-2

Feb. 10, 2017, 5:18 p.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"Two main sections of the Discrimination Act deal with gender equality at work. First, there is the requirement that all employers must actively pursue specific goals to promote equality between men and women. Second, the law prohibits discrimination and obliges employers to investigate and take measures against any harassment. Also, employers must not unfairly treat any employee or job applicant who is, has been or will be taking parental leave" (3).
June 19, 2016, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: Botswana
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

The law does not mandate nondiscrimination based on gender in hiring (95).
Feb. 29, 2016, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

""Yes. Whenever a woman becomes pregnant, she is sent home or set up to work in a non-combat position, such as military nurse. It is her choice." Alyona Zubchenko" (25)
Aug. 24, 2015, 3:59 p.m.
Countries: Ecuador
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"In the Armed Forces there has been a major change in sociocultural patterns through the promotion of gender equality and women’s rights. In 2010, the rules on matters relating to maternity in training schools were amended and provisions were removed under which a woman who became pregnant during the period of training was immediately placed on leave" (28)
Aug. 1, 2015, 11 p.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"This is not applicable since The Bahamas does not have an active military" (para 5). This data does not shed light on the treatment of pregnant women or mothers of minor children within the Royal Bahamas Defense Force (NWRL - CODER COMMENT)
June 15, 2015, 7:53 a.m.
Countries: Lithuania
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"To ensure the possibility for women soldiers to balance maternity and career and for men soldiers to balance childcare and career, the Minister of National Defence approved, by Order No. V-163 of 29 February 2008 , a Statute of Military Service. Paragraph 52 of the Statute provides that pregnant and breastfeeding women soldiers or women soldiers just after giving birth as well as men soldiers who have a child under 14 years of age or a disabled child under 18 years of age may be called to serve on watch and to work, in the case of necessity, extra hours (after working hours and during holidays or days-off) only subject ...more
April 16, 2015, 4:34 p.m.
Countries: Malawi
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

Women who get pregnant can ask for a noncombat position.
Feb. 24, 2010, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: Brunei
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"The growth outlook for Brunei businesswomen is very encouraging, with the government and the influential Women’s Business Council vigorously working for their advancement. Women are not barred from any profession, except combat roles in the armed forces" (4).
Sept. 15, 2009, 9:01 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"The amendment to the Military Personnel Act of January 2004 enables women public officers to take maternity leaves during pregnancy, childbirth, and care of children three-years-old or younger (Article 11.4)" (9).
June 26, 2009, 8:29 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Croatia, Germany, Mexico, Romania, Slovakia, South Africa, Vietnam
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-1, EMCMS-LAW-2

"Argentina, Croatia, Germany, Mexico, Romania, Slovakia, South Africa and Viet Nam took steps to recruit more women for military service and changed policies to improve their access to service, including by repealing discriminatory policies, offering equal opportunities and equal treatment for women, promulgating policies known as "fast tracking" to increase women’s representation in the higher echelons of the armed forces and creating other opportunities for women’s professional advancement" (9-10).
May 15, 2009, 6:12 p.m.
Countries: Belgium
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"The law of 12 January 2007 on verifying the application of the resolutions of the global conference on women held in Beijing in September 1995 and integrating the dimension of gender within the totality of federal policies, published in the Belgian Monitor on 13 February 2007. This law, developed at the initiative of the federal Minister of Equal Opportunity during the period under examination, provides for the evaluation of the impact of gender for all draft laws and regulations undertaken by the Government with the goal of preventing or correcting any deleterious effects on the situation with respect to women and of taking into consideration their specific needs" (11-12).more
April 15, 2009, 9:39 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"During the conflict, WAAFG [women associated with armed forces and groups] organized themselves into complex work structures based on age and physical health. Positioning themselves away from the front line, the older women cared for the babies and children born to WAAFG, as well as the so-called 'Red Army' of children recruited to serve alongside men in battle. Middle-aged women were responsible for making food to take to the front and for hunting game with guns, while the 20-30 year olds would walk to the front to replenish diminishing stocks. Having walked for days, these women would then turn around and carry the injured back to the bush to be ...more
April 24, 2008, 9:46 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"For all categories of military personnel, conditions of early discharge from service include death, poor health and important family reasons." (4)
March 7, 2008, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

There is no military service in Iceland (20).
March 5, 2008, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"The Committee notes that the State party does not have armed forces and that consequently there is no legal regulation of voluntary or compulsory recruitment (2)"
March 5, 2008, 10:08 p.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"'With regard to Article 3, paragraph 2, of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, the Republic of Iceland declares that it has no national armed forces, and hence, a minimum age for recruitment is not applicable in the case of the Republic of Iceland' (2)..Armed groups do not exist in Iceland (2)...Iceland has called for the minimum age for participation in armed conflict to be 18 years. A resolution to this effect was passed by a Nordic ministerial meeting held in Iceland in 1999 (4)."
Feb. 29, 2008, 9:32 a.m.
Countries: Serbia
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"On the basis of the provisions cited above, it is possible to conclude that women have the right to enrol on military schools, colleges and academies. However, the Decision of the Chief of General Staff contains a provision according to which an applicant for military schools and military academies must be of male sex" (p. 57).
Feb. 26, 2008, 11:29 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"In this context, it must be acknowledged that during the war, forcible military recruitment was common practice both for the national army and the guerrilla groups that made up the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca. According to both the official report of the Commission for Historical Clarification, established under the peace agreements, and the reports of non-governmental organizations and indigenous movements, such as the National Coordinating Committee of Guatemalan Widows (CONAVIGUA), during the internal armed conflict some 45 per cent of the male population was recruited at some time by one or other of the parties to the conflict, and 20 per cent of those recruited were minors... Before the peace ...more
Feb. 26, 2008, 11:20 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"The Committee notes with appreciation: The State party's declaration made upon the ratification of the Optional Protocol that the minimum age for compulsory recruitment into the armed forces of Guatemala is 18 years... The Committee, while recognising the reference to the right of persons under 18 years old not to be recruited, even in case of armed conflict, in the Integral Law for the Protection of Children and Adolescents of 2003, is concerned that is no clear prohibition of the recruitment of children below the age of 18 and no specific provision in the Criminal Code criminalizing forced recruitment below the age of 18. Furthermore, the Committee is concerned that ...more
Feb. 8, 2008, 9:04 a.m.
Countries: El Salvador
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"The Constitution of the Republic (art. 215, para. 1) also stipulates that: "Military service shall be compulsory for all Salvadorans between the ages of 18 and 30 years." Notwithstanding this provision, the same article of the Constitution stipulates that, where the military situation so requires, "all Salvadorans who are fit for military services" shall be conscripted" (7).
Feb. 5, 2008, 6:16 p.m.
Countries: El Salvador
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"Pregnant female personnel have access, entirely free of charge, to the medical facilities of the Military Hospital, as do their minor children" (40).
Jan. 18, 2008, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

Within the Women's Corp the are posts known as Chen and act as a resort to female soldiers who face problems such as sexual harassment, gender-based discrimination, or gynecological problems. I would infer that from here a resource available for a woman who becomes pregnant or has minor children
Jan. 18, 2008, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

While not conclusive, it appears that pregnant women have guidelines issued as a result of the Miller case discussed in the previous report that entail "instructions regarding pregnancy
Dec. 1, 2007, 1:50 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"The Committee welcomes the establishment of the Committee for the Prevention of the Recruitment of Child Soldiers, but is deeply concerned at the direct and indirect impact of the armed conflicts on children in the State party. In particular, the Committee is extremely concerned at the use of children below the age of 15 years as soldiers by both the governmental armed forces and the armed groups as has repeatedly been reported, notably in the last report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict (A/58/546-S/2003/1053 and Corr.1 and 2)" (66).
Dec. 1, 2007, 1:46 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"The Committee welcomes the recent order of the Government of Myanmar, which overruled those provisions of the Towns Act and the Village Act that authorized the Government to extract forced labour from women. The Committee considers forced labour of women to be a contemporary form of slavery and a denial of their rights. The Committee, however, is concerned that the Towns Act and the Village Act remains as legislation. It is further concerned that there is little information about the implementation and enforcement of the recent order" (113).
Nov. 28, 2007, 7:18 p.m.
Countries: Belgium
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"For the year 2004 (at 31 December), total enlistment figures were: 64 military candidates (14 women and 50 men) under 18 years of age, 38 (7 women and 31 men) aged 17, and 26 (7 women and 19 men) aged 16" (7). "For 2004 (as at 31 December 2004), 53 candidates under 18 years of age were enrolled (in military colleges) (8 women and 45 men). The total number aged 17 at 31 December 2004 was 27 (1 woman and 26 men). The total number aged 16 at 31 December 2004 was 26 (7 women and 19 men)" (10).
Nov. 28, 2007, 6:56 p.m.
Countries: Austria
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"Since the 2003 amendment to the National Defence Act women may volunteer for military training for a period of 12 months, voluntary armed manoeuvres (for training purposes) and functional services (to fulfil other military tasks in the interest of fast, economical, cost-effective and purposeful discharge of duties). Women are excluded from involvement in armed conflicts and not liable to do military service" (5).
Sept. 21, 2007, 9:25 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"Amended in January 2002, the Civil Servants Act enables women in public service to take maternity leaves during pregnancy, childbirth, and care of children three-years-old or younger. It adjusted the duration of the leave to a maximum of one year per one child, and counts the entire time of the leave into the period of active service (Article 11.4)" (9). "The amendment to the Military Personnel Act of January 2004 enables women public officers to take maternity leaves during pregnancy, childbirth, and care of children three-years-old or younger (Article 11.4)" (9)
Aug. 17, 2007, 1:22 p.m.
Countries: Moldova
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"It is important to stress out that stereotype attitudes are persisting in some educational institutions, such as the Military Institute and the Police Academy. During registration for the period 2003-2004, the Military Institute and the Police Academy have registered men only, despite hundreds of girls calling the Ministry of Education. To solve the problem, the Ministry could not change the situation, due to the fact that registration schedules are developed by resort ministries and the above mentioned institutions are in their subordination. As an explanation of the confused situation in registering girls officials invoked lack of specific provisions allowing girls to study at these institutions. Due to demographic preponderance, women ...more
July 26, 2007, 3:04 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-2

"It is worth mentioning that recently a few women-military servants have voluntarily enrolled Georgian Army [sic]" implying that women are not draftable but can still serve in the military should they wish to (coder comment)