The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for ERBG-DATA-4

Aug. 7, 2017, 4:16 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4, ERBG-DATA-5

"Perhaps not surprisingly then, 68 percent of mothers in Japan quit their jobs upon marriage or childbirth. Among the women that do remain economically active, the majority seek part-time or irregular employment"(para 5)
July 6, 2017, 9:42 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Among the women that do remain economically active, the majority seek part-time or irregular employment" (para 5).
July 3, 2017, 2:58 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1, ERBG-DATA-4

"the Committee remains concerned at:..The continued concentration of women in part-time work owing to family responsibilities, which affects their pension benefits and is partly responsible for post-retirement poverty as well as the persistent reports of maternity and child-birth related harassment" (11)
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3, ERBG-DATA-4, MULV-DATA-1

Figure 3.3 shows women’s share of part-time workers by main reason for part-time work in 2013. For those who work part-time because they are retired or have a social security limit on earnings, women make up 49.2%. For those who work part-time for slack work or business conditions, women make up 51.4%. For those who work part-time because they are in school or training, women make up 56.5%. For those who could only find part-time work, women make up 59%. For those who turn to part-time work because they have other family or personal obligations, women make up 90.1% of them. And for people who have child care problems and ...more
Dec. 2, 2016, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"The majority of the active working population are people in full-time employment. In 2012, the share of part-time employed women and men stood at 12.4 and 8.9 per cent, respectively. A slight upward trend has been recorded in the part-time work of women and a slight downward trend in the part-time work of men" (38)
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Eighty-five percent of employed women work all year round, and 15 percent work either seasonally (7 percent) or occasionally (8 percent). Continuity of employment varies by sector. Eighty-eight percent of women who work in the agricultural sector work year round, compared with 83 percent of women engaged in nonagricultural work. Twelve percent of women who are employed in agricultural sector are seasonal or occasional workers” (37).
Sept. 14, 2016, 4:05 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“The majority of women (79 percent) are self-employed. Eight in 10 women work all year, and 13 percent work seasonally. As expected, women employed in the agricultural sector are more likely to work according to season than those employed in nonagricultural occupations” (49). “Men are slightly less likely than women to be paid in cash only (80 percent and 74 percent, respectively) and to work all year (82 percent and 76 percent, respectively) (Table 3.7.2). Similar to women, seasonal work is mostly in the agricultural sector (41 percent)” (50). “Practically all women (95 percent or more) in Kwara, Ekiti, Ogun, Osun, and Oyo work throughout the year. The states with ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Differentials by continuity of employment show that 70 percent of women in agricultural work are seasonally employed, whereas 77 percent of women in nonagricultural work are employed all year” (39). “With regard to continuity of employment, 68 percent of employed women work all year, 24 percent are seasonal workers, and 8 percent are considered occasional workers. Seventy-seven percent of women employed in non-agricultural work are employed all year, 14 percent are seasonal workers, and 9 percent are considered occasional workers. The majority of women employed in agriculture are seasonal workers, while 27 percent work all year” (39).
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:44 p.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Sixty-two percent of women who work in agriculture are employed throughout the year, compared with 88 percent of those who do nonagricultural work. Women are more likely to do seasonal work if they work in the agricultural sector than if they work in the nonagricultural sector (35 percent versus 8 percent)” (47).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:53 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Differentials by continuity of employment show that 70 percent of women in agricultural work are seasonally employed, whereas 77 percent of women in nonagricultural work are employed all year” (39). “With regard to continuity of employment, 68 percent of employed women work all year, 24 percent are seasonal workers, and 8 percent are considered occasional workers. Seventy-seven percent of women employed in non-agricultural work are employed all year, 14 percent are seasonal workers, and 9 percent are considered occasional workers. The majority of women employed in agriculture are seasonal workers, while 27 percent work all year” (39).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:52 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Differentials by continuity of employment show that 70 percent of women in agricultural work are seasonally employed, whereas 77 percent of women in nonagricultural work are employed all year” (39). “With regard to continuity of employment, 68 percent of employed women work all year, 24 percent are seasonal workers, and 8 percent are considered occasional workers. Seventy-seven percent of women employed in non-agricultural work are employed all year, 14 percent are seasonal workers, and 9 percent are considered occasional workers. The majority of women employed in agriculture are seasonal workers, while 27 percent work all year” (39).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:50 a.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Sixty-five percent of women are employed year-round, and 28 percent are employed on a seasonal basis. Nonagricultural work is more continuous than agricultural work, with 73 percent of women doing nonagricultural work employed all year compared with 49 percent of women doing agricultural work” (53).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:46 a.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Women are more likely to work throughout the year than men. Three in four women hold a job all year compared with 57 percent of men. The agricultural sector is more likely to provide seasonal employment for both men (45 percent) and women (51 percent). On the other hand, work in the nonagricultural sector is more likely to provide income throughout the year (79 percent of women and 62 percent of men)” (48).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:45 a.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“A large majority of working women are employed all year (67 percent). Almost half of women doing agricultural work seasonally (49 percent), while most of those in non-agricultural work are employed throughout the year (71 percent)” (29).
Aug. 7, 2016, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: Austria
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Approximately 47 percent of employed women worked part time, compared with 32 percent in 2000” (19).
July 27, 2016, 10:06 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Seventy-four percent of employed women work all year round, and 26 percent work either seasonally (11 percent) or occasionally (15 percent). Continuity of employment varies by sector. Fifty-two percent of women who work in the agricultural sector work year round, compared with 79 percent of women engaged in nonagricultural work. Forty-eight percent of women who are employed in the agricultural sector work are seasonal or occasional workers” (44). “In contrast with women (74 percent), 95 percent of men work year round, while 5 percent work either seasonally or part of the year (Table 3.8). Small variations are observed in the employment patterns by background characteristics. As expected, men who completed ...more
July 27, 2016, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Thirty-seven percent of women working in agriculture are employed all year compared with 75 percent of women engaged in nonagricultural work. Fifty-nine percent of women working in agriculture are seasonally employed compared with 17 percent of those who are nonagricultural workers” (48).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Luxembourg
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

According to Table 4.9, 19% of women and 2% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 29% of women and 2% of men worked part-time (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

According to Table 4.9, 33% of women and 9% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 2007 (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Honduras
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Between 1990 and 2007, out of 35 countries with available data, part-time employment (defined here as employment of less than 30 hours per week) was seen to have increased for women in 21 countries and for men in 26. Particularly high increases during the period were observed for both women and men in Germany, Honduras and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (table 4.9), as well as for women in Ireland and Italy and for men in the Republic of Korea and Spain...Outside Europe, a part-time rate of 35 per cent or more was recorded for women in Argentina, Australia, Honduras and New Zealand" (94). According to Table 4.9, 25% of ...more
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Norway
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"The proportion of women working part-time decreased in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden (by 5 percentage points or more) although that for men increased slightly" (94). According to Table 4.9, 40% of women and 7% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 32% of women and 11% of men worked part-time (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Venezuela
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Between 1990 and 2007, out of 35 countries with available data, part-time employment (defined here as employment of less than 30 hours per week) was seen to have increased for women in 21 countries and for men in 26. Particularly high increases during the period were observed for both women and men in Germany, Honduras and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (table 4.9), as well as for women in Ireland and Italy and for men in the Republic of Korea and Spain" (94). According to Table 4.9, 10% of women and 2% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 32% of women and ...more
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"The proportion of women working part-time decreased in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden (by 5 percentage points or more) although that for men increased slightly" (94). According to Table 4.9, 40% of women and 8% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 25% of women and 8% of men worked part-time (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Belgium
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

According to Table 4.9, 29% of women and 4% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 33% of women and 6% of men worked part-time (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"The proportion of women working part-time decreased in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden (by 5 percentage points or more) although that for men increased slightly" (94). According to Table 4.9, 25% of women and 5% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 20% of women and 10% of men worked part-time (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico, Nicaragua
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

According to Table 4.9, 19% of women and 8% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 28% of women and 8% of men worked part-time (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Austria
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

According to Table 4.9, 32% of women and 5% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 2007 (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

According to Table 4.9, 27% of women and 9% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 26% of women and 11% of men worked part-time (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

According to Table 4.9, 19% of women and 5% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 15% of women and 5% of men still worked part-time (95).
May 25, 2016, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"In the Bahamas and Trinidad and Tobago, declines of 4 and 5 percentage points, respectively, were registered for both women and men" (94). According to Table 4.9, 16% of women and 14% of men worked part-time (less than 30 hours per week) in 1990. By 2007, 12% of women and 10% of men worked part-time (95).