The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IAD-LAW-1

Aug. 9, 2019, 1 p.m.
Countries: D R Congo
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-2, CUST-LAW-1, IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"According to UNICEF, many widows were unable to inherit their late husbands’ property because the law states that in event of a death in which there is no will, the husband’s children, including those born out of wedlock (provided that they were officially recognized by the father), rather than the widow, have precedence with regard to inheritance" (page 41).
Aug. 3, 2019, 6:15 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"Although Article 20(1) of the Constitution states that women are not to be discriminated against on the basis of gender, the Country Code still contains discriminatory provisions as to inheritance and property. For instance, married daughters are not considered in the succession line and unmarried daughters can dispose of only 50 percent of their immovable property on will, while they need the consent of a male guardian for the disposal of the remaining 50 percent. Moreover, a daughter has the right to her mother’s exclusive property only if her father and brother are not alive. Despite Article 20(4) of the Constitution states that sons and daughters have equal rights to...more
Aug. 3, 2019, 5:51 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-LAW-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1

"In terms of the inheritance of moveable property women, where eligible, receive half the share of an equivalently positioned male family member in Niger, as stipulated in Islamic law. This is in some ways quite progressive in the sense that custom among non-Muslims at the turn of the century would not have provided for the inclusion of women in the division of wealth of her father or husband. Yet even here, Maliki texts, if strictly observed would be far more favorable to women than other competing understandings of «custom» regarding property insofar as it touches on immoveable property-land. Often in Niger the application of Maliki inheritance law is tempered by...more
Aug. 3, 2019, 5:33 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1

"In Niger, inheritance is governed by customary (which varies between different ethnic groups) and/or Sharia law. Sharia law stipulates that women may inherit from their father, mother, husband or children and, under certain conditions, from other family members. However, their share is generally smaller than that to which men are entitled. Daughters, for example, inherit half as much as sons, unless a will has been left specifying otherwise...Generally, the application of Maliki inheritance law is often tempered by the view that women are less responsible and reliable than men and therefore less suited to inheriting family property. As a result, women rarely inherit land at the time of the division...more
Aug. 3, 2019, 5:27 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1

"In Niger, inheritance is governed by customary (which varies between different ethnic groups) and/or Sharia law. Sharia law stipulates that women may inherit from their father, mother, husband or children and, under certain conditions, from other family members. However, their share is generally smaller than that to which men are entitled...Widows may not receive anything if there are no surviving children and are often the victims of 'property grabbing' on the part of her deceased husband’s male relatives. According to the Chronic Poverty Research Centre, in 2006, 23.75% of widows inherited majority of assets after their spouses passed away. In some regions, when a husband dies, his property and land...more
July 31, 2019, 6:50 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"Inheritance laws also discriminate against women, since daughters receive half the inheritance awarded to their brothers" (43).
July 20, 2019, 7:21 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Sharia law provides for detailed and complex calculations of inheritance shares. Women may inherit from their father, mother, husband or children and, under certain conditions, from other family members. However, their share is generally smaller than that to which men are entitled. Female heirs, for example, inherit half as much as male heirs, unless a will has been left specifying otherwise. Women may also be reluctant to bring inheritance cases to court, for fear of causing conflict within the family" (para 5).
July 20, 2019, 7:17 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Islamic law provides for detailed and complex calculations of inheritance shares. Women may inherit from their father, mother, husband or children and, under certain conditions, from other family members. However, their share is generally smaller than that to which men are entitled" (162)
July 20, 2019, 6:51 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Women have the legal right to acquire land via Islamic and state law; however, their inheritance rights are governed by Islamic Sharia law. Women may inherit from their fathers, mothers, husbands or children, and under certain conditions, from other family members, but their share is generally smaller than that to which men are entitled. The social status attached to property and land often makes it difficult for widows and daughters to inherit even their entitled shares, as they may face opposition from the deceased man’s relatives. The 2011 Anti-Women Practices Law makes it a punishable offence to deprive women of their inheritance right" (1-2)
July 20, 2019, 8:20 a.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"The government’s interpretation of Islamic law is the basis of inheritance law for all citizens except Christians. Accordingly, courts usually granted Muslim women half of the inheritance share of male heirs. In all communities male heirs must provide financial support to female relatives who inherit less. If they do not, women have the right to sue" (Pg 46).
July 19, 2019, 9:41 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Inheritance practices are to a great extent governed by Sharia law" (188)
July 19, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Jordanian inheritance laws apply in the Palestinian territories and are derived directly from the Koran. Although women have legally enforceable inheritance rights, they are entitled to half the share of their male counterparts" (16). Palestine observes Sharia/Islamic law (MAD - CODER COMMENT)
July 19, 2019, 9:25 p.m.
Countries: Papua New Guinea
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"In matters of ‘inheritance’, the State does not recognize before or during marriage what either parties owns and brings into marriage. However, the Court would require disclosure of assets by either party in divorce proceedings. The Constitution provides equal distribution of wealth and inheritance between women/girls and men/boys. The Public Curator’s Office under the provision of the ‘Wills & Probates Administration Act’ distributes estates equally among the children (if any) or next of kin of the deceased" (38)
July 19, 2019, 9:07 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Most ethnic groups use bilateral inheritance systems whereby both male and female descents may inherit. Succession norms follow either the primogeniture system, by which land is inherited by the eldest male or female child, as among the Ifugao population, or the equal sharing system, by which all male and female heirs inherit equally, as it happens among the Pangasinense. The surviving spouse may not inherit, but holds the land in trust for the children...Muslim groups are patrilineal and follow patrilineal inheritance practices, where land is passed along the male line" (para 6-7)
July 19, 2019, 8:34 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Women do not have equal inheritance rights in Qatar, as inheritance is governed by sharia law, which allows women to inherit half what a similarly situated male relative would receive (e.g. daughters receive half the amount that sons receive)" (2). Qatar observes Sharia law (MAD - CODER COMMENT)
July 19, 2019, 12:22 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-2, IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1

"Dalit women in particular faced discrimination by virtue of their gender and caste status. The law grants women equal shares of their parents’ inheritance and the right to keep their property after marriage, but many women were not aware of their rights, and others were afraid to challenge existing practice. The law also grants widows complete access and authority to the estate of their deceased husbands; however, traditional attitudes stigmatizing and shunning widows persisted, and communities often ignored the law, while the government did not take sufficient measures to enforce it" (Pg 28).
July 9, 2019, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Zambia
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"Statutory law prescribes that a man’s children equally share half of an estate, the widow 20 percent, other dependents 10 percent, and the deceased’s parents 20 percent" (Pg 23).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: ADCM-PRACTICE-1, IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"Inheritance laws do not discriminate against women, although some inheritances passed disproportionately to sons. In addition, many men hid their assets with their parents or other family members, so that if divorce occurred, they could claim no wealth and become exempt from paying child support or other restitution to the former wife" (Pg 22).
July 2, 2019, 2:25 p.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"Inheritances pass to and through male children only" (Pg 20).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

In accordance with Islamic judicial interpretation, a Muslim widow inherits one-eighth of her husband’s estate; of the remaining seven-eighths, two-thirds goes to the sons and one-third to the daughters" (Pg 66).
June 26, 2019, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Somalia
Variables: LO-LAW-1, LO-DATA-3, IAD-LAW-1

"While formal law and sharia provide women the right to own and dispose of property independently, various legal, cultural, and societal barriers often obstructed women from exercising such rights. By law girls and women could inherit only half the amount of property to which their brothers were entitled. A 2010 report from a local women’s organization in Somaliland indicated 75 percent of women did not own livestock, land, or other property. Only 15 to 20 percent received inheritance from male family members" (Pg 35-36).
June 22, 2019, 8:06 p.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"Inheritances pass to and through male children only" (p. 19).
June 20, 2019, 3:46 p.m.
Countries: Rwanda
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"The law allows women to inherit property from their fathers and husbands, and couples may make their own legal property arrangements" (Pg 33).
June 20, 2019, 10:07 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"Sisters inherit only one-half as much as their brothers" (p. 15).
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"The 2011 Prevention of Anti-Women Practices Act makes it illegal to deny women inheritance of property by deceitful means. The law entitles female children to one-half the inheritance of male children. Wives inherit one-eighth of their husband’s estate. Women often received far less than their legal entitlement" (Pg 47).
June 17, 2019, 12:20 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"The law favors male heirs in adjudicating inheritance" (Pg 15).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: CWC-DATA-2, LO-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Although the constitution provides for equal legal status and rights regardless of gender, women do not have the same rights as men under family law, which customary courts usually adjudicate. In customary law legal rights as head of household typically apply only to men. Customary law does not consider a divorced or widowed woman, even with children, to be a head of household. Traditional and religious beliefs resulted in discrimination in education, employment (see section 7.d.), owning or managing a business, credit, and property rights. Discrimination was worse in rural areas, where women helped with subsistence farming and did most of the childrearing, cooking, water- and wood-gathering, and other work....more
June 11, 2019, 12:13 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1, LO-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, AFE-LAW-1

"The law provides for equality in ownership of property, inheritance rights, access to education, and equal pay for equal work" (56).
June 8, 2019, 1:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"Under sharia as applied in the country, daughters inherit half the amount that sons receive. A sole female heir receives only half of her parents’ estate, with the balance going to uncles, whereas a sole male heir inherits all of his parents’ property" (32).
May 28, 2019, 5:40 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"Women cannot marry without permission of their male guardians; do not have equal rights in inheritance, divorce, or child custody; and have little legal protection" (38). "Under sharia inheritance laws, which assume that women receive support from their male relatives, daughters receive half the inheritance and accidental death or injury compensation awarded to their brothers" (38).