The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IAD-PRACTICE-1

Oct. 4, 2017, 12:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

"As the Afghan Ministry of Justice estimates, 90 percent of Afghans decide land rights according to customary laws – regulations developed and instituted at the regional and tribal level. For this reason, few Afghan women are able to capitalize on their right to inherit and own property" (para 2). "While customary law varies throughout the country, it typically pressures a woman to relinquish her share of an inheritance to her brothers in order to ensure her social protection in case of divorce; demonstrate family loyalty; and avoid discrimination and shame at the hands of her community. The cultural expectation is that a woman's husband will become her economic provider and ...more
Aug. 11, 2017, 10:32 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

"'I have daughter only. I should give birth of son for having ancentral property. Son couldn't born if I commit sin. I would stay in shed once I have baby boy'"(para 4). This statement was made by Nandasara Sarki from Badhu, Bajura (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:55 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-2, IAD-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Son you should focus on your studies instead of wasting your time playing on your phone at all times. You need to study hard! After all, you will be the one who shall take care of us when we are old and eventually inherit our property". The father tells his son this at 0:01. He also has a daughter (ENB-Coder Comment)
June 21, 2017, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

"Most single mothers live in apartments inherited from deceased relatives or parents" (70).
June 17, 2017, 1:56 p.m.
Countries: Colombia, Venezuela
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“The Guajiro are an Indian community in Colombia and Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) ... Today, keeping cattle, as well as sheep and goats, is the mainstay of their livelihoods. The animals are eaten, marketed and accumulated for prestige. Both men and women own livestock. However, the society is matrilineal and women do not perform any direct tasks with livestock – they only use them for various transactions, such as selling, gifting and inheriting. When a man dies, many of his animals are sacrificed, with remainder passed on to his brothers and nephews. When a woman dies, her animals are inherited by her children. The transmission of property is a complex ...more
June 17, 2017, 1:45 p.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Indigenous women living on reserves (where land is held communally) have matrimonial property rights. First Nations may choose to follow federal law or enact their own rules related to matrimonial real property rights and interests that respect their customs” (15).
June 12, 2017, 3:41 p.m.
Countries: Brunei
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Ms. Taib (Brunei Darussalam) said that Islam permitted the equal division of inheritance, on the condition that there was a consensus among the parties. Furthermore, Islam encouraged the making of gifts to women, and men were expected to fulfill the role of breadwinner. Therefore, men were entitled to a greater share of inheritance than women” (6).
June 12, 2017, 9:22 a.m.
Countries: Brunei
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1

“In accordance with the government’s interpretation of the Quran’s precepts, Muslim women and men are accorded different rights. For example, Islamic family law ... requires that men receive twice the inheritance of women” (16).
June 1, 2017, 7:52 a.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, PW-PRACTICE-3

“The 1981 law on inheritance does not discriminate on the grounds of gender.[12] According to data gathered by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), while Afro-Trinidadian communities do not necessarily favour males over females, inheritance has traditionally been patrilineal among the country’s East Indian communities. This gap has shifted to a more egalitarian distribution in recent years. In terms of customary practices that affect inheritance rights for women, polygamy, for example, continues to be practiced in Trinidad and Tobago, despite being punishable by law” (para 4).
May 31, 2017, 10:09 a.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“The pattern of patrilineal farm succession is still rooted deeply in today’s family farms, although daughters and sons have equal rights to inherit land and to be the successor of the family farm. Gender-segregated socialisation and education significantly contribute to that pattern despite the modernisation of rural areas” (673).
May 31, 2017, 9:38 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Land is often acquired by inheritance ... the patrilineal inheritance system excludes most women from owning land (even communal land), and the issue of land tenure remains complicated and tenuous” (9).
May 30, 2017, 11:39 a.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"While women enjoy the same legal status and rights as men under ... inheritance laws, they experienced discrimination in some areas" (1).
May 30, 2017, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Macedonia
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“In FYR Macedonia, land ownership averages 16 percent for women. One community, Aerodrom, has piloted activities to reverse this tendency, concentrating on the economic empowerment of women, and encouraging parents to divide property equally among their male and female children” (para 10).
May 30, 2017, 7:31 a.m.
Countries: Macedonia
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

According to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report of 2014, Macedonia scored a 0 on a scale of 0 to 1 assessing daughters’ inheritance rights with 0 being the best score and 1 being the worst (TPJ – CODER COMMENT).
May 29, 2017, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Jamaica
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Wives felt secure in continuing to bear the respected title of ‘Mrs.’ and knowing that their and their children’s inheritance was intact. ... Stories are told in Jamaica of husbands completely disinheriting their wives by assigning their holdings to the other family in their wills” (114).
May 29, 2017, 5:03 p.m.
Countries: Jamaica
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“In the case of the Rio Grande Valley, the situation of land ownership of small-scale farmers is similar to the rest of Jamaica. The majority of the farmers (men and women) occupy family land that is regarded as an unlimited resource. The work of Besson refers to family land as unlimited, rooted in the central tenet of the institution: namely, that such land sustains all the founder’s descendants, traced through both sexes, forever. This central principle is stipulated by the ancestors who established the family land and is reiterated by his or her descendents down the generations. Family land is, therefore, based on an unrestricted cognatic descent system” (42).more
May 29, 2017, 1:53 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Inheritance continues to be handled according to Islamic Sharia law, which favors male heirs. Daughters, for instance, receive half as much of an estate as sons. Widows without children may receive nothing, especially in rural areas, where traditional beliefs prevail. The argument in favor of gender bias in inheritance law is that women are not expected to provide for their families and children, although this holds less true in Tunisia than in most of the Muslim world” (1212).
May 29, 2017, 1:37 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“According to InformantLCSO-7, one of the informants working for the national rural women‘s network in Cusco, women‘s rights are often violated due to the machismo mindset: Women obtain land through marriage, and do not need to inherit land. This practice is still present” (53-54).
May 29, 2017, 1:19 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Our qualitative studies indicate that male preference in inheritance of land is still strong in the Peruvian highland” (25).
May 27, 2017, 6:44 p.m.
Countries: Romania
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Traditional house heritage by youngest son is no longer the rule and it is sometimes challenged by young men migrants: ‘What is there to inherit from my parents?! These ideas are so old fashioned, it is not working like this anymore, that I’m the youngest and I should inherit the [parents’] house and land. What shall I take? The chickens and their coop?!’ (Ion, 36 years old, single, returned [to Romania] in 2006 after 13 years work experience in Italy)” (31-32)
May 24, 2017, 5:30 p.m.
Countries: Netherlands
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“There is no sign of customary or religious governing inheritance laws, though reports suggest that women migrants may face more challenges in claiming their rights” (para 5).
May 19, 2017, 8:01 a.m.
Countries: Taiwan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“In a traditional Chinese society, women tend to be regarded as economically dependent, and are often pressured to give up their inheritance rights in the face of opposition from their male kin, the ministry explained” (para 5).
May 19, 2017, 8 a.m.
Countries: Taiwan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“The number of women in Taiwan who chose to waive their right to inheritance last year surpassed that of their male counterparts by 7,000 people, according to Ministry of Finance figures released on Sunday. According to the ministry statistics, 30,000 women in 2015 waived their right to inheritance, while only 23,000 men did so. Meanwhile, among the 210,000 individuals who paid their estate and gift tax during this period, female heirs only accounted for about 40 percent of the total, or 82,000 people. According to tradition, only males can pass down property and the family name, the Finance Ministry said, pointing out that although Taiwanese males and females are equal ...more
May 15, 2017, 7:19 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Because women are not expected to pay for household expenses or support their husband and children, they are paid less when they work, and they receive much smaller shares of inheritance. Daughters, for instance, receive half as much as sons, and widows without children often receive nothing. In much of the country, women are unaware that they have inheritance rights at all and do nothing to stop male heirs from taking all of the estate” (1181).
May 15, 2017, 7:18 p.m.
Countries: Croatia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Inheritance is handled without respect to gender” (330).
May 10, 2017, 10:32 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Of the 67 reserve inheritance court sentences handed down by courts in Seoul from January last year to March this year, 51.6 percent of plaintiffs were found to be daughters, while only 25.2 percent of them were sons. Among the defendants, 49.6 percent of them were sons, while only 18.8 percent of them were daughters, reflecting the traditional culture in which parents favored sons over daughters. ‘Because of the notion shared by the traditional generation that daughters are out of the family circle once they marry, parents usually leave a larger share of inheritance to their sons rather than daughters,’ said Lim Chae-woong, a lawyer at law firm Bae, Kim ...more
May 10, 2017, 10:32 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Women are increasingly filing inheritance lawsuits against their siblings, seeking a fair part of their inheritance” (para 7).
May 9, 2017, 1:56 p.m.
Countries: Haiti
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“On inherited land, men described approximately 38% of the parcels (16/42) as somewhat secure or tenure insecure. In contrast, women described 53% (21/40) of their inherited parcels as somewhat secure or tenure insecure” (16). “Importantly, the difference between men and women [in rates of land use] was pronounced for inherited land. On male inherited land, 16% (7/42) of the parcels were identified by the men as not being actively used in the last year. This stands in sharp contrast to the nearly 48% (19/40) of female inherited parcels that women identified themselves as not actively using in the last year. Importantly, these gender differences are not pronounced on purchased land. ...more
May 9, 2017, 1:13 p.m.
Countries: Maldives
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Islamic law also governs estate inheritance, which grants male heirs twice the share of female heirs. According to the PGO, however, property was generally divided equally among siblings unless the men in the family demanded a larger share (21).
May 9, 2017, 12:30 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

“In order to get public opinion on unequal inheritance rights and chieftainship, the Department of Gender mounted a national campaign and conducted mobile campaigns, meetings, public gatherings and consultations in all ten districts of Lesotho. Besides, inheritance was designated as the theme for the year 2014 and 2015 African women’s month. The outcome was that the majority of Basotho women and men agreed that the law should provide equal inheritance rights with reservations to arable land that has to remain with the family. Few were of the opinion that women, especially girl children could only have inheritance rights where there is no male child in a family” (3). "It should ...more