The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IAW-PRACTICE-1

July 6, 2017, 8:57 a.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"'[My mother-in-law] told me: 'It's customary when your husband dies, you have to leave and go back to your home'. I was shocked'" (para 3). "Even though Tanzania's constitution guarantees equal rights to own property, customary law which often takes precedence, especially in rural areas, states that widows have no right to inherit from their husbands" (para 4). "In 2015, a U.N. committee called on Tanzania to amend laws and customs that discriminate against women after independent experts considered a complaint by two widows, who had been evicted by their in-laws following the deaths of their husbands" (para 6). "Provisions allowing widows to live on their matrimonial property until they ...more
June 17, 2017, 3:31 p.m.
Countries: Venezuela
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-1, ADCM-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1

“What is particularly worrisome about the sole focus on female household heads as beneficiaries in the [land] reforms in Venezuela … is that if in the case of couples, only husbands are on the beneficiary lists, this leaves women vulnerable in the case of household dissolution” (275).
June 1, 2017, 7:52 a.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, PW-PRACTICE-3

“The 1981 law on inheritance does not discriminate on the grounds of gender.[12] According to data gathered by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), while Afro-Trinidadian communities do not necessarily favour males over females, inheritance has traditionally been patrilineal among the country’s East Indian communities. This gap has shifted to a more egalitarian distribution in recent years. In terms of customary practices that affect inheritance rights for women, polygamy, for example, continues to be practiced in Trinidad and Tobago, despite being punishable by law” (para 4).
May 31, 2017, 9:39 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"Land is often acquired by inheritance or when the woman changes status to become the head of her household following ... the death of her husband. Women heads of household and widows represent only 16 percent of all households in the oasis regions and do not have access to land titles that can be used as collateral for bank loans. ... the patrilineal inheritance system excludes most women from owning land (even communal land), and the issue of land tenure remains complicated and tenuous” (9).
May 31, 2017, 9:34 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

“Women also face significant challenges in retaining their property after ... widowhood” (7).
May 30, 2017, 11:39 a.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"While women enjoy the same legal status and rights as men under ... inheritance laws, they experienced discrimination in some areas" (1).
May 29, 2017, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Jamaica
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Wives felt secure in continuing to bear the respected title of ‘Mrs.’ and knowing that their and their children’s inheritance was intact. ... Stories are told in Jamaica of husbands completely disinheriting their wives by assigning their holdings to the other family in their wills” (114).
May 29, 2017, 5:38 p.m.
Countries: Jamaica
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

“Sad stories are constantly told in Jamaica of left-behind husbands passing away in Jamaica and wives returning from abroad to ‘put out’ the other woman and her children, sell the husband’s property, and leave again for the United States, without the other woman receiving any part of the husband’s fortune, or even any recognition, for her years of devotion” (67).
May 29, 2017, 1:53 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Inheritance continues to be handled according to Islamic Sharia law, which favors male heirs. Daughters, for instance, receive half as much of an estate as sons. Widows without children may receive nothing, especially in rural areas, where traditional beliefs prevail. The argument in favor of gender bias in inheritance law is that women are not expected to provide for their families and children, although this holds less true in Tunisia than in most of the Muslim world” (1212).
May 29, 2017, 1:37 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“According to InformantLCSO-7, one of the informants working for the national rural women‘s network in Cusco, women‘s rights are often violated due to the machismo mindset: Women obtain land through marriage, and do not need to inherit land. This practice is still present” (53-54).
May 29, 2017, 1:19 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Our qualitative studies indicate that male preference in inheritance of land is still strong in the Peruvian highland” (25).
May 25, 2017, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-1, ADCM-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1

“In cases when a marriage ends by any means such as when the husband died, most women [in the southern border provinces] do not get their fair share of the marriage property and the inheritance is not managed according to the spirit of Islam" (9).
May 24, 2017, 5:30 p.m.
Countries: Netherlands
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“There is no sign of customary or religious governing inheritance laws, though reports suggest that women migrants may face more challenges in claiming their rights” (para 5).
May 19, 2017, 8:01 a.m.
Countries: Taiwan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“In a traditional Chinese society, women tend to be regarded as economically dependent, and are often pressured to give up their inheritance rights in the face of opposition from their male kin, the ministry explained” (para 5).
May 19, 2017, 8 a.m.
Countries: Taiwan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“The number of women in Taiwan who chose to waive their right to inheritance last year surpassed that of their male counterparts by 7,000 people, according to Ministry of Finance figures released on Sunday. According to the ministry statistics, 30,000 women in 2015 waived their right to inheritance, while only 23,000 men did so. Meanwhile, among the 210,000 individuals who paid their estate and gift tax during this period, female heirs only accounted for about 40 percent of the total, or 82,000 people. According to tradition, only males can pass down property and the family name, the Finance Ministry said, pointing out that although Taiwanese males and females are equal ...more
May 15, 2017, 7:19 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Because women are not expected to pay for household expenses or support their husband and children, they are paid less when they work, and they receive much smaller shares of inheritance. Daughters, for instance, receive half as much as sons, and widows without children often receive nothing. In much of the country, women are unaware that they have inheritance rights at all and do nothing to stop male heirs from taking all of the estate” (1181).
May 15, 2017, 7:18 p.m.
Countries: Croatia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Inheritance is handled without respect to gender” (330).
May 11, 2017, 6:09 p.m.
Countries: Suriname
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

“Where local customs remain a strong influence on the family unit, inheritance rights pass to husbands. Men and women generally enjoyed the same legal rights under property law and under the judicial system, but where citizens observed local customs, these rights were somewhat infringed” (12).
May 11, 2017, 10:57 a.m.
Countries: Switzerland
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-LAW-1

"The Committee is further concerned that laws governing inheritance of property often prevent widows from inheriting farms in the event of their husband’s death” (14).
May 9, 2017, 1:56 p.m.
Countries: Haiti
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“On inherited land, men described approximately 38% of the parcels (16/42) as somewhat secure or tenure insecure. In contrast, women described 53% (21/40) of their inherited parcels as somewhat secure or tenure insecure” (16). “Importantly, the difference between men and women [in rates of land use] was pronounced for inherited land. On male inherited land, 16% (7/42) of the parcels were identified by the men as not being actively used in the last year. This stands in sharp contrast to the nearly 48% (19/40) of female inherited parcels that women identified themselves as not actively using in the last year. Importantly, these gender differences are not pronounced on purchased land. ...more
May 9, 2017, 1:13 p.m.
Countries: Maldives
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Islamic law also governs estate inheritance, which grants male heirs twice the share of female heirs. According to the PGO, however, property was generally divided equally among siblings unless the men in the family demanded a larger share (21).
May 9, 2017, 12:30 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"It should be noted that most of the female registered land is owned by single women, widows or women who have inherited it. It is also worth mentioning that most land registrations are done by urban residents" (4).
May 9, 2017, 8:39 a.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“The Committee is further concerned about the persistence of discriminatory customary laws and practices, especially in rural areas and remote communities, with regard to, inter alia, marriage and its dissolution, inheritance and property rights” (9).
May 6, 2017, 9:42 a.m.
Countries: Somalia
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“While formal law and sharia provide women the right to own and dispose of property independently, various legal, cultural, and societal barriers often obstructed women from exercising such rights. By law girls and women could inherit only half the amount of property to which their brothers were entitled. A 2010 report from a local women’s organization in Somaliland indicated 75 percent of women did not own livestock, land, or other property. Only 15 to 20 percent received inheritance from male family members” (34).
May 5, 2017, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Suriname
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“The law provides for protection of women’s rights to equal access to ... property. Societal pressures and customs, especially in rural areas, inhibited the full exercise of these rights, particularly with respect to marriage and inheritance” (13).
May 3, 2017, 10:56 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

“During the year CEDOVIP [Center for Domestic Violence Protection] reported receiving 18 cases concerning widows whose in-laws denied them access to marital property, housing, and their children, particularly in cases where the women’s names were absent from the property documents and when the women were in polygynous relationships” (29).
May 2, 2017, 5:44 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"please indicate how the State party is addressing the prevalent customary practices that continue to preclude women from inheriting or owning property and land in rural areas where property is governed by customary law" (7).
May 2, 2017, 11:04 a.m.
Countries: Moldova
Variables: SMES-DATA-2, LO-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-3, IAW-PRACTICE-1

“Romani women who are single mothers, divorced or widowed face difficulties in securing their rights to housing and land” (16).
May 2, 2017, 10:51 a.m.
Countries: Moldova
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-3, IAW-PRACTICE-1

“The Committee is also concerned about information received that, following divorce or death of the husband, women are, in practice, often denied their right of inheritance” (11).
April 24, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

“Table 1 revealed that land ownership by women through inheritance was a closed issue. Gender inequality was entrenched into the traditional land tenure system. It was a general belief that married women owed their allegiance to where they were married and not their natal families. Because their children can inherit lands from their fathers the women were denied land ownership rights” (55).