The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IIP-PRACTICE-1

Nov. 10, 2017, 1:02 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1, MURDER-DATA-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1

"According to the Hidden Gulag IV report, since late 2008, Jongo-ri (Camp 12) in North Hamkyung Province was expanded to include a women’s annex. Camp 12’s women’s annex holds approximately 1,000 women, most of whom were imprisoned after being repatriated from China. The existence of this women’s annex was corroborated by satellite imagery and defector testimony. Defector testimony cited food rations below subsistence levels, forced labor, and high rates of death due to starvation at Camp 12"(3)
Nov. 7, 2017, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"[Iman] Assaf blamed the spread of unemployment among women on the Israeli occupation, which erects checkpoints between cities in the West Bank, thus undermining Palestinians’ movements, the marginalization of Palestinian women, their isolation in some remote areas and discrimination between the two genders in employment"(para 7)
Nov. 7, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"On April 10, the authorities at the Manila airport — her stopover in the Philippines between Kuwait, from where she’d escaped a forced marriage, and Australia, where she’d planned on applying for asylum — confiscated Ms. Lasloom’s passport and boarding pass to Sydney and held her at an airport hotel until her uncles arrived" (para 2).
Nov. 7, 2017, 3:25 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Within days of Ms. Lasloom’s coerced repatriation, another Saudi woman tried to escape an abusive family, this time within Saudi Arabia. Maryam Al-Otaibi managed to flee Qassim Province and hide in Riyadh, but the authorities arrested her and sent her back home, where she was then imprisoned" (para 8). "Ms. al-Johani said her family kept her locked up for eight months when she made a visit home during her studies in America" (para 10). "'Most horrific is that once a woman is locked in any state institution,' she said, 'she won’t be released unless into the custody of a male relative or else she will stay in the prison or ...more
Oct. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Some Nubian women have left their region's villages to make their own way, either by completing their studies or seeking out new job opportunities, and have succeeded in integrating into the world outside their societies"(para 1)."Regarding the change taking place in the acceptance of women leaving Nubia, she [Asma Mahmoud] said, 'Few Nubians accept the idea of a woman studying or working outside of her environment, though it's commonplace to live abroad with one's husband or first-degree relative'"(para 5)."Following up, [Wahibah] Saleh said, 'Nubian society is an open society from the inside. There is a great deal of integration between women and men. Women are not forced into marrying and ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Although Nepal has taken major steps to empower women since the end of its decade-long civil war in 2006, widowhood remains surrounded by taboos in this patriarchal society.Like other widows, Adhikari said she was no longer allowed to attend religious ceremonies or other celebrations because women who have lost their husbands are seen as inauspicious"(para 11-12)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Most recently in Dagestan, a father reportedly killed his two daughters for coming home late"(para 17)
Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Widows are among Afghanistan’s most vulnerable groups. They sometimes are stigmatized as morally loose because they frequently don’t have male guardians to protect them. They are also more visible in public, since when they work it is often outside the home" (para 12).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"They said they were only allowed to leave their houses dressed in full face veil (niqab) and accompanied by a close male relative" (para 4). "These restrictions have sharply reduced women’s ability to participate in their community. Many said that before ISIS took control, they had left their houses every day, to visit family or shop, but after ISIS arrived they only left once a month, or in some cases even less frequently" (para 52).
Sept. 27, 2017, 11:50 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Eight women have been arrested in Iran for dressing up as men so they could watch a football match. Islamic law in the country bans women from attending live matches when men are present and the group were detained at Tehran's Azadi Stadium" (para 1-2). "He told Memri: 'The ban is aimed at preserving their honor, because the stadium's atmosphere, commotion, and crowds are no place for them. 'Women who wish to watch the match can do so on TV, which broadcasts the games and gives everyone a way to watch them live'" (para 5-6). "Among the other seemingly innocent acts that can result in being reprimanded include women uploading ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 7:06 p.m.
Countries: France
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Olivier said that many of the sex workers who arrive in France have their passports confiscated by pimps.'We will provide them with documents on the condition they commit to leave prostitution behind,' she added"(para 8-9)
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Robina Jalali was on the first women’s team to compete in 2004 in the Olympics for Afghanistan after the Taliban were toppled. A runner, she was one of two at the 2004 Games. Now the head of women’s sports at the National Olympic Committee, she says that even the foreign embassies are no longer paying much attention.'The main problem is the growing insecurity we have; secondly, violence against women, which is growing. Women are not feeling safe to train,' she said. 'Now we see the youth are just running away from the country, which has changed the mentality of the embassies,' she continued. 'They feel they can’t give a girl ...more
Sept. 12, 2017, 10:04 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, IIP-LAW-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-2, ATDW-LAW-5, CUST-LAW-1

"Women in Iran are subject to pervasive discrimination both in law and practice, including in areas concerning marriage, divorce, child custody, freedom of movement, employment, and access to political office"(para 17)
Aug. 31, 2017, 4:49 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Even when they are able to escape [violence], women with disabilities might have to leave behind mobility aids, such as wheelchairs, medicine and hearing aids. This can lead to long-term health consequences and restrict their independence. If their caregivers have left the area, the women may become completely dependent on others” (para 8).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Their [adolescent girls’] worlds tended to revolve mainly around their families, especially their mothers and friends, and the places they go are usually limited to their homes, school or work, market places, and mosques” (20). “Girls identified the ring road that splits the focus area, Ezbet Khirallah, into two areas as the highest risk for their safety. The only link between Ezbet Khirallah and outer Cairo is the road itself and tunnels built under it, which pose high risks for community members. The road poses a constant risk of accidents for girls who have to use transportation for going to school or work. The tunnels that run under the road ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:33 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Their [adolescent girls’] worlds tended to revolve mainly around their families, especially their mothers and friends, and the places they go are usually limited to their homes, school or work, market places, and mosques” (20). “The results of the study show that girls across all the neighbourhoods [in Delhi] experienced fear, violence, and discrimination in different ways. The public places where girls most frequently went were the community taps to collect water for drinking and cooking, market places, and bus stops. Public transportation, especially buses, was counted as among the most unsafe spaces, where girls had to regularly contend with sexual harassment” (20). “The participants in the study identified a ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:31 a.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Their [adolescent girls’] worlds tended to revolve mainly around their families, especially their mothers and friends, and the places they go are usually limited to their homes, school or work, market places, and mosques” (20). “Adolescent girls perceive Lima as a dangerous city. Girls feel insecure to walk on the streets, and are greatly concerned with the high level of crimes in Lima. Only 2.2% of girls reported always feeling safe when using public transportation. Objects obstructing their vision in streets, poorly lit areas, stray dogs, uncollected garbage and debris, and lack of signage are additional elements that make girls feel unsafe in urban spaces” (22). “Girls in Lima connected ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Their [adolescent girls’] worlds tended to revolve mainly around their families, especially their mothers and friends, and the places they go are usually limited to their homes, school or work, market places, and mosques” (20). “In Kampala, 80% of girls reported feeling ‘very unsafe’ or ‘unsafe’ in public spaces. Girls outlined that they feel particularly unsafe in markets, roads, recreational centres, and other urban spaces due to high incidents of rape and theft. Girls felt unsafe when they were moving through the city – when using public transportation, when walking, and when using passenger taxis and motorcycles (boda-boda)” (21). “The issue of lighting clearly emerged as the most tangible element ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:28 a.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Their [adolescent girls’] worlds tended to revolve mainly around their families, especially their mothers and friends, and the places they go are usually limited to their homes, school or work, market places, and mosques” (20). “Concerns over being able to use city parks emerged as a common theme from the girls who participated in the Hanoi study. They explained that concerns over personal and infrastructural safety limit the number of people who use the space, especially adolescent girls. Girls explained that in the period immediately before and after the workday, the parks get crowded with local people doing their daily exercise, but aside from these select times, the parks are ...more
Aug. 30, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"I liked her behavior so I picked Beezly. She’s pure. Most girls mix with other boys and have relations. I don’t like that. I’ve had better proposals, but I didn’t like the girls’ behavior. A good girls goes to school and straight home and that's it" (1). This is a quote from a 25 year-old-man who married a 13 year-old-girl (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Aug. 26, 2017, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Once they [domestic workers] arrive in Oman, new employers often seize their passports so that they cannot depart when they want, ultimately, denying them their freedom of movement” (para 2).
Aug. 23, 2017, 1:15 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Dozens of women in Pakistan took part in female-only bike races in major cities on Sunday, in an event organized to challenge male dominance of public spaces in the country. ‘Our strategy is simply to be visible in public spaces,’ said Meher Bano of Girls at Dhabas, a feminist group which organized the races after a woman from Lahore was pushed off her bicycle by a group of men last year for not responding to catcalls” (para 1-2). “The bike race was one of many events organized in the last few years by Girls at Dhabas - the name given to roadside restaurants in Pakistan - to promote female participation ...more
Aug. 21, 2017, 8:31 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“The Sabarimala temple is one of a few in India which bars entry to women aged between 10 and 50 years old, saying that menstruating women are impure. Discrimination against menstruating women is common in some parts of south Asia, where they are forbidden from entering houses or temples and taking part in festivals and community events” (para 5). “The Shani Shingnapur temple in Ahmednagar, in the western state of Maharashtra, opened its inner sanctum to women following a Mumbai court ruling that it was the fundamental right of women to enter any place of worship that allows men access, and that the state should protect this right. The Mahalaxmi ...more
Aug. 16, 2017, 9:46 p.m.
Countries: France
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-2

"He [Paul Cassia] added: 'I was in Nice two days ago. There are women in the street with veils. It’s completely unreasonable to ban them from the beach, while they are free to walk around the city. It’s hysteria'"(para 32)
Aug. 14, 2017, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"'Everything was always a discrimination in our family,' says [Jamila] Afghani, who observed how her brothers behaved with their wives. 'They were educated women, but my brothers stopped them from continuing their education and working,' she recounts. 'I thought, if [my brothers] can go outside, why not my sisters-in-law'"(para 9). Jamila Afghani and her family moved from Afghanistan to Pakistan when she was in fifth grade (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 14, 2017, 1:41 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Friday prayers are usually men’s business, and during the Taliban rule in the 1990s, women were not allowed in mosques. But in one neighborhood in the city, an imam has kept the doors of his mosque open to women for 12 years now"(para 1)."Today, according to [Jamila] Afghani, about 20 percent of Kabul’s mosques have special prayer areas for women, whereas only 15 years ago there were none"(para 4)."'Everything was always a discrimination in our family,' says [Jamila] Afghani, who observed how her brothers behaved with their wives. 'They were educated women, but my brothers stopped them from continuing their education and working,' she recounts. 'I thought, if [my brothers] ...more
Aug. 14, 2017, 8:43 a.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1

"The survey also collected information on restrictions or limitations to women’s freedom – such as being prevented from seeing friends, communicating with family, performing religious practices or seeking health care without permission. More than 42 per cent of women reported experiencing such restrictions" (para 12-13).
Aug. 9, 2017, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-2, NGOFW-DATA-1

"Sister Sobia came and spoke to me about the details of the Parivartan Program. I have always thought that girls should have the opportunity to go out and be able to play. Now they have a chance to do so within a safe environment. So I said ‘Add my girl’s name’". This statement was made by Saima's mother Sameema at 1:11 (ENB-Coder Comment)
July 17, 2017, 8:05 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

¨Even holy places — temples and mosques — it seems aren’t free from discriminating against the fair sex.The country has lately been in the grip of a nationwide furore over a few renowned temples banning women’s entry into their sanctum sanctorum. The reason given for the perpetration of such sexism is as flimsy as it’s regressive — women menstruate and are therefore `impure’ and unfit to enter shrines¨(para 1-2).¨For instance, when a senior priest at Sabarimala Temple in southern Kerala declared last November that women won’t have access to the shrine till a machine was invented to detect if they were ´pure´ or weren’t menstruating, locals reacted with outrage¨(para 4).¨Similarly, ...more
July 5, 2017, 5:10 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Personal affairs cases, including male guardians withholding women’s official documents, have dropped from 151 in 2015 to 135 in 2016. 'In the majority of these cases, women are violated by their current or ex-husbands,” said Al-Abideen, adding that 2016 saw 44 complaints from wives against their husbands and 37 from divorcees'" (para 6-7).