The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IIP-PRACTICE-1

June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, IIP-LAW-1

"Although prohibited by law, the practice of buying and selling brides also continued in rural areas. Many tribes, communities, or families practiced sequestering women from all contact with men other than their relatives. Despite prohibitions on handing over women as compensation for crimes or as a resolution of a dispute (also known as 'vani; or 'swara'), the practice continued in Punjab and KP. In rural Sindh landowning families continued the practice of 'marriage to the Koran,' forcing a female family member to stay unmarried to avoid division of property. Property of women married to the Koran remained under the legal control of their fathers or eldest brothers, and such women...more
June 17, 2019, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Under the kingdom’s restrictive guardianship system, women are legal minors and cannot marry, divorce, travel, get a job, be released from prison or have elective surgery without permission from their male guardians. Women are also forbidden from mixing freely with members of the opposite sex" (para 3). "Women may be charged with moral crimes, like khilwa (which means mixing with unrelated members of the opposite sex) or with fleeing from their homes" (25). "The male guardianship system is another factor which prevents women from being able to travel abroad for an abortion as their male guardian may not allow them to go" (27).
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-2, IW-PRACTICE-1, IW-LAW-1

"Despite the new federal law, purdah, the cultural practice of secluding women and pubescent girls from unrelated men, continued in various parts of the North. In some parts of the country, widows experienced unfavorable conditions as a result of discriminatory traditional customs. “Confinement,” which occurred predominantly in the Northeast, remained the most common rite of deprivation for widows. Confined widows stayed under social restrictions for as long as one year and usually shaved their heads and dressed in black as part of a culturally mandated mourning period. In other areas communities viewed a widow as a part of her husband’s property to be “inherited” by his family. In some traditional...more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: CWC-DATA-2, LO-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Although the constitution provides for equal legal status and rights regardless of gender, women do not have the same rights as men under family law, which customary courts usually adjudicate. In customary law legal rights as head of household typically apply only to men. Customary law does not consider a divorced or widowed woman, even with children, to be a head of household. Traditional and religious beliefs resulted in discrimination in education, employment (see section 7.d.), owning or managing a business, credit, and property rights. Discrimination was worse in rural areas, where women helped with subsistence farming and did most of the childrearing, cooking, water- and wood-gathering, and other work....more
June 7, 2019, 11:46 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Survivors also described the prevailing insecurity and movement constraints as a hindrance to reporting cases to authorities. Women continued to suffer confinement and movement restrictions throughout Afghanistan, particularly in the more rural areas, due to family restrictions stemming from cultural norms, financial dependency and general insecurity" (Pg 26).
May 28, 2019, 5:40 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"On October 17, a group of unidentified Islamists entered the Administrative Sciences College in Aden and informed the staff and students they could no longer teach male and female students in the same classes, according to an NGO" (24). "Social discrimination severely restricted women’s freedom of movement. Women in general did not enjoy full freedom of movement, although restrictions varied by location. Some observers reported increased restrictions on women in conservative locations, such as Sa’ada" (26). "In September authorities twice prevented Dr. Shafiqa al-Wahsh, director of the Women’s National Committee, from leaving the country to participate in meetings in preparation for peace talks. The Houthis stated they rejected her request...more
May 22, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"On International Women’s Day in Pakistan last month, thousands of exuberant young feminists staged their second Aurat (women’s) March. Intended to build on the success of a well-received march last year, it was designed to be inclusive, peaceful and raucously joyful. It had women from all walks of life, some in Western clothes, others in full veils, head scarves and burqas. Women from cities and villages. Female health workers and teachers. Trans women and male allies" (Para 1).
May 21, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Montenegro can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (115).
May 21, 2019, 8:59 p.m.
Countries: Mongolia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Mongolia can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (115).
May 21, 2019, 3:24 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Mozambique can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Morocco can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (116).
May 21, 2019, 10:09 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Myanmar can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (117).
May 20, 2019, 2:23 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Namibia can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (117).
May 20, 2019, 1:57 p.m.
Countries: Netherlands
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in the Netherlands can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (118).
May 20, 2019, 1:17 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Nepal can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (118).
May 18, 2019, 7:50 p.m.
Countries: Nicaragua
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Nicaragua can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (119).
May 18, 2019, 7:03 p.m.
Countries: New Zealand
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in New Zealand can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (119).
May 17, 2019, 2:02 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Nigeria can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Niger can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (120).
May 16, 2019, 7:41 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Law and custom generally do not respect freedom of movement for women. For example, the law prevents a woman from applying for a passport without the consent of her male guardian or a legal representative. Women could not obtain the Civil Status Identification Document, required for access to public services, food assistance, health care, employment, education, and housing, without the consent of a male relative. This restriction affected women in conflict, according to local NGOs. In ISIS-controlled areas, ISIS forces reportedly forbade women from leaving their homes unless male relatives escorted them. ISIS also prevented professional women from returning to work, with the exception of medical workers and teachers. The...more
May 16, 2019, 5:06 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Oman can legally travel outside the country, but not her home in the same way as a man (121).
May 16, 2019, 4:24 p.m.
Countries: Norway
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Norway can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (121).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Pakistan can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (122).
May 16, 2019, 2:56 p.m.
Countries: Papua New Guinea
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Papua New Guinea can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (123).
May 16, 2019, 2:01 p.m.
Countries: Panama
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Panama can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (123).
May 15, 2019, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Peru can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (124).
May 15, 2019, 2:12 p.m.
Countries: Paraguay
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Paraguay can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (124).
May 15, 2019, 1:18 p.m.
Countries: Poland
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Poland can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (125).
May 15, 2019, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in the Philippines can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (125).
May 15, 2019, 10:12 a.m.
Countries: Mongolia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Mongolia can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (115).