The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IIP-PRACTICE-1

July 31, 2019, 6:50 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Women’s rights activist Mariyam al-Otaiby was reportedly detained in April after she left the family house without her male guardian’s permission, and was held 104 days without trial until her release on July 30" (30). "In April, Dina Ali Lasloom was reportedly returned to Saudi Arabia against her will from the Philippines while in transit to Australia to claim political asylum in order to escape a forced marriage" (31). "Widespread societal exclusion enforced by, but not limited to, state institutions restricted women from using many public facilities. The law requires women to sit generally in separate, specially designated family sections. They frequently cannot consume food in restaurants that do not...more
July 25, 2019, 3:22 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1, CWC-DATA-3, IIP-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"However, the government continued to deny Rohingya access to formal schooling, prevent them from working legally, restrict their movement, and suspend birth registration for nearly one year, all of which increased vulnerability to trafficking" (97).
July 21, 2019, 6:15 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"While the increasing representation of women in public spaces can be considered a positive development, should their increasing participation in the labor market in such atrocious circumstances and conditions be applauded as a milestone on the road toward gender equality, or is war-torn Yemen simply heading for equality in misery?" (para 6). "The June 2016 World Bank report stated that 52% of the internally displaced persons in Yemen — more than 3 million people — consist of women, many of whom are now heading their displaced households. In a Yemeni context, this absence of adult men can be interpreted as the death of the male heads of those households, their...more
July 20, 2019, 8:20 a.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Women participated in public life and in most professions, including the armed forces, although violence in many regions reduced women’s access to the public sphere. Women and men have equal legal rights in owning or managing land or other property, although cultural and religious norms impeded women’s rights, especially in rural areas. Various sources observed that women constituted a minority of lawyers, university professors, and other professions" (Pg 46). "In areas under its control, ISIS published a 'Civilization Document' with 16 points that a woman must follow or face the death penalty. They included staying at home and not leaving it without an immediate male relative (mahram); wearing a wide...more
July 19, 2019, 12:22 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: CLCW-LAW-2, IIP-PRACTICE-1

"In an attempt to protect women from being trafficked or abused, the government maintained a minimum age of 24 for women traveling overseas for domestic employment. NGOs and human rights activists viewed the age ban as discriminatory and counterproductive because it impelled some women to migrate through informal channels across the Indian border" (Pg 16).
July 11, 2019, 5:35 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"The lack of access to… freedom of movement of Rohingya women and girls… especially those who are unregistered" (12).
July 8, 2019, 2:42 p.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-LAW-1, CLCW-LAW-2, IRP-LAW-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Ostensibly to combat trafficking in persons, government regulations require male relatives of women between ages 18 and 35 to submit a statement pledging that the women would not engage in illegal behavior, including prostitution, while abroad" (Pg 21).
July 4, 2019, 9:20 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Saudi Arabia has long been known as one of the world’s most restrictive environments for women, where they could not travel alone, hold a wide range of jobs, show their hair in public or drive" (para 1). "A series of recent decisions by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the country’s young, de facto ruler, could revolutionize the lives of Saudi women. ...They [women] will soon be allowed to attend soccer matches at public stadiums...In June, they will be allowed to drive cars, even motorcycles, the government says" (para 2). "But how much these dizzying decisions will affect individuals will depend on several factors, including where they live, their age, their...more
June 21, 2019, 12:48 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Authorities sometimes did not permit entry to such trials to individuals other than diplomats who were not the legal agents or family members of the accused. Court officials at the SCC sometimes prevented individuals from attending trial sessions for seemingly trivial reasons, such as banning female relatives or diplomats from attending due to the absence of women officers to inspect the women upon entry to the courtroom" (Pg 13). "The CPVPV monitored and regulated public interaction between members of the opposite sex. In November, CPVPV officials raided a meeting of the Taif literary club on suspicion that the meeting was not gender segregated" (Pg 16). "Women under the age of...more
June 20, 2019, 11:09 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"The segregation of women in the home; and the requirement that women be chaperoned by a male relative (mahram)" (2). "Women in public life, or women working outside the home, are subject to frequent threats and all too often assassinated by attackers, including the Taliban, opposed to women’s autonomy" (2). "In 2012 President Karzai himself dramatically undermined women’s rights when he publicly endorsed a set of guidelines issued by a religious council that described women as 'secondary' to men, called for full segregation of the sexes in public and in education and employment, and implied that violence against women can sometimes be justified" (2). "A particularly glaring example is the...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, IIP-LAW-1

"Although prohibited by law, the practice of buying and selling brides also continued in rural areas. Many tribes, communities, or families practiced sequestering women from all contact with men other than their relatives. Despite prohibitions on handing over women as compensation for crimes or as a resolution of a dispute (also known as 'vani; or 'swara'), the practice continued in Punjab and KP. In rural Sindh landowning families continued the practice of 'marriage to the Koran,' forcing a female family member to stay unmarried to avoid division of property. Property of women married to the Koran remained under the legal control of their fathers or eldest brothers, and such women...more
June 17, 2019, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Under the kingdom’s restrictive guardianship system, women are legal minors and cannot marry, divorce, travel, get a job, be released from prison or have elective surgery without permission from their male guardians. Women are also forbidden from mixing freely with members of the opposite sex" (para 3). "Women may be charged with moral crimes, like khilwa (which means mixing with unrelated members of the opposite sex) or with fleeing from their homes" (25). "The male guardianship system is another factor which prevents women from being able to travel abroad for an abortion as their male guardian may not allow them to go" (27).
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-2, IW-PRACTICE-1, IW-LAW-1

"Despite the new federal law, purdah, the cultural practice of secluding women and pubescent girls from unrelated men, continued in various parts of the North. In some parts of the country, widows experienced unfavorable conditions as a result of discriminatory traditional customs. “Confinement,” which occurred predominantly in the Northeast, remained the most common rite of deprivation for widows. Confined widows stayed under social restrictions for as long as one year and usually shaved their heads and dressed in black as part of a culturally mandated mourning period. In other areas communities viewed a widow as a part of her husband’s property to be “inherited” by his family. In some traditional...more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: CWC-DATA-2, LO-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Although the constitution provides for equal legal status and rights regardless of gender, women do not have the same rights as men under family law, which customary courts usually adjudicate. In customary law legal rights as head of household typically apply only to men. Customary law does not consider a divorced or widowed woman, even with children, to be a head of household. Traditional and religious beliefs resulted in discrimination in education, employment (see section 7.d.), owning or managing a business, credit, and property rights. Discrimination was worse in rural areas, where women helped with subsistence farming and did most of the childrearing, cooking, water- and wood-gathering, and other work....more
June 7, 2019, 11:46 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Survivors also described the prevailing insecurity and movement constraints as a hindrance to reporting cases to authorities. Women continued to suffer confinement and movement restrictions throughout Afghanistan, particularly in the more rural areas, due to family restrictions stemming from cultural norms, financial dependency and general insecurity" (Pg 26).
May 28, 2019, 5:40 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"On October 17, a group of unidentified Islamists entered the Administrative Sciences College in Aden and informed the staff and students they could no longer teach male and female students in the same classes, according to an NGO" (24). "Social discrimination severely restricted women’s freedom of movement. Women in general did not enjoy full freedom of movement, although restrictions varied by location. Some observers reported increased restrictions on women in conservative locations, such as Sa’ada" (26). "In September authorities twice prevented Dr. Shafiqa al-Wahsh, director of the Women’s National Committee, from leaving the country to participate in meetings in preparation for peace talks. The Houthis stated they rejected her request...more
May 22, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"On International Women’s Day in Pakistan last month, thousands of exuberant young feminists staged their second Aurat (women’s) March. Intended to build on the success of a well-received march last year, it was designed to be inclusive, peaceful and raucously joyful. It had women from all walks of life, some in Western clothes, others in full veils, head scarves and burqas. Women from cities and villages. Female health workers and teachers. Trans women and male allies" (Para 1).
May 21, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Montenegro can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (115).
May 21, 2019, 8:59 p.m.
Countries: Mongolia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Mongolia can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (115).
May 21, 2019, 3:24 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Mozambique can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Morocco can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (116).
May 21, 2019, 10:09 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Myanmar can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (117).
May 20, 2019, 2:23 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Namibia can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (117).
May 20, 2019, 1:57 p.m.
Countries: Netherlands
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in the Netherlands can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (118).
May 20, 2019, 1:17 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Nepal can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (118).
May 18, 2019, 7:50 p.m.
Countries: Nicaragua
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Nicaragua can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (119).
May 18, 2019, 7:03 p.m.
Countries: New Zealand
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in New Zealand can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (119).
May 17, 2019, 2:02 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Nigeria can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Niger can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (120).
May 16, 2019, 7:41 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Law and custom generally do not respect freedom of movement for women. For example, the law prevents a woman from applying for a passport without the consent of her male guardian or a legal representative. Women could not obtain the Civil Status Identification Document, required for access to public services, food assistance, health care, employment, education, and housing, without the consent of a male relative. This restriction affected women in conflict, according to local NGOs. In ISIS-controlled areas, ISIS forces reportedly forbade women from leaving their homes unless male relatives escorted them. ISIS also prevented professional women from returning to work, with the exception of medical workers and teachers. The...more