The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IM-DATA-2

Jan. 26, 2017, 3:08 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Bangladesh has achieved some progress in the health sector and has been successful in raising the average life expectation of its population. However, the situation of female health is still poor. The difference of child mortality between male and female is very high, where female child mortality is higher than that of their male counterparts. The child mortality in case of male was 46.7 per thousand live births in 1993-94, which has decreased to 16 per thousand live births in 2007 with an annual average decreasing rate of 2.19 per thousand live births. On the other hand, for female, it was 62.3 per thousand live births in 1993-94, which has ...more
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:08 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“Boys are more likely to die in childhood than girls. The gender gap is most pronounced in the postneonatal period (between 1 month and12 months)” (117).
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“As expected, neonatal mortality is higher among boys than girls (31 deaths and 26 deaths per 1,000 live births, respectively) as by nature from the time of conception, boy babies are more vulnerable than girl babies. All other mortality rates, except neonatal mortality, are higher for girls than for boys” (105). “With the exception of the 2004 and 2007 BDHS, all BDHS surveys reported both higher postneonatal and child mortality for girls than for boys—a pattern that has been observed in other countries of South Asia where strong son preference is thought to result in relative nutritional and medical neglect of girl children (Das Gupta 1987; Basu 1989)” (105). “The ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 4:05 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“As noted in earlier DHS surveys, mortality rates are generally higher among male children than female children. This is true for all categories of mortality. With the exception of mothers in the 40-49 age group, infant mortality is higher for mothers under age 20 than for older mothers” (122).
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“In general, female children experience lower mortality than male children at all ages, with under-five mortality rates of 58 and 79 deaths per 1,000, respectively” (102).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:55 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“As noted in earlier DHS surveys, mortality rates are generally higher among male children than female children. This is true for all categories of mortality. With the exception of mothers in the 40-49 age group, infant mortality is higher for mothers under age 20 than for older mothers” (122).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:53 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“In general, female children experience lower mortality than male children at all ages, with under-five mortality rates of 58 and 79 deaths per 1,000, respectively” (102).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:52 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“In general, female children experience lower mortality than male children at all ages, with under-five mortality rates of 58 and 79 deaths per 1,000, respectively” (102).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:50 a.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“Male children are more likely than female children to die during their first year of life (44 deaths versus 37 deaths per 1,000 live births). Once past infancy, male and female children one to four years of age experience the same level of mortality (16 deaths per 1,000 live births)” (xxii). “Male children are more likely than female children to die during their first year of life (44 deaths versus 37 deaths per 1,000 live births). Once past infancy, male and female children 1-4 years of age experience the same level of mortality (16 deaths per 1,000 live births)” (111). “Male children are more likely than female children to die ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:47 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“As noted in earlier DHS surveys, mortality rates are generally higher among male children than female children. This is true for all categories of mortality. With the exception of mothers in the 40-49 age group, infant mortality is higher for mothers under age 20 than for older mothers” (122).
July 27, 2016, 10:06 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“Male children have higher neonatal mortality than female children, while female children experience higher postneonatal and child mortality than males. Neonatal mortality is expected to be higher for boys than for girls because baby boys are more vulnerable than baby girls from the time of conception” (117). “With the exception of the 2004 and 2007 BDHS, all BDHS surveys reported both higher postneonatal and child mortality for females than for males—a pattern that has been observed in other countries of South Asia where strong son preference is thought to result in relative nutritional and medical neglect of female children (Das Gupta, 1987; Basu, 1989)” (117). “The 2011 BDHS indicates that ...more
July 27, 2016, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“Table 8.3 shows that across all childhood mortality indicators the rates for male children are higher than those for female children. The under-five mortality rate for male children is 186 deaths per 1,000 live births compared with 164 deaths per 1,000 live births for female children” (103).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Honduras
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 39, for females was 34 (157).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 175, for females was 166 (159).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Dominican Republic
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 40, for females was 34 (157).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Madagascar
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 85, for females was 78 (159).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 38, for females was 28 (157).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Zambia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 151, for females was 122 (161).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 55, for females was 46 (157).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 135, for females was 121 (155).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 37, for females was 32 (159).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 22, for females was 23 (157).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 114, for females was 97 (161).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Armenia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 21, for females was 22 (155).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 80, for females was 58 (159).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 147, for females was 131 (157).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Albania
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 86, for females was 55 (155).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 62, for females was 62 (159).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Zimbabwe
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 88, for females was 68 (161).
May 30, 2016, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: IM-DATA-2

According to table 8, Health Inequities, Under-five mortality rate (probability of dying by age 5 per 1000 live births) for males was 123, for females was 87 (157).