The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IRP-LAW-3

Feb. 29, 2016, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

""Prostitution is illegal in Ukraine. So, there are no laws that enable a prostitute to demand that a man wear a condom. There are also no laws that require prostitues to be tested for AIDS/STDs. The government is trying to integrate more testing options for women in rural and urban areas, also to teach them how to prevent STDs. Doctors are also making young teenagers more aware of how to prevent it. Testing is not required, but is increasingly encouraged." Anna Cheburei" (9)
Dec. 31, 2015, 8:40 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Three uniformed male police officers raided her room while she was with a customer. During such raids, the police typically collect a used condom or other evidence from a bedside trash can" (para 2)
June 30, 2015, 7:44 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Interviews conducted with sex workers in Windhoek in 2008 found that...violence within the industry as sex workers are sometimes forced to have sex without a condom and are vulnerable to abuse from their clients. Research conducted in the same year to assess linkages between HIV and prostitution suggests that prostitutes in Namibia are at a high risk of contracting HIV/AIDS as most do not have the bargaining power to negotiate condom use with their clients due to lack of money" (29). This information shows that there is no law that allows a prostitute to require a man to wear a condom (RNP-CODER COMMENT)
May 28, 2015, 12:46 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"No, because the law says that there should be no prostitutes. If caught with prostitute, you can be sent to prison. There is testing but not through the government, but through associations. If the prostitute has a positive test, she can go to the government hospital to get medicine" (7)
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: New Zealand
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"In recent years, the most sweeping example of decriminalization by national law is New Zealand’s Prostitution Reform Act of 2003. The law explicitly states that its intent is at once to decriminalize prostitution undertaken by persons over the age of 18 years and to 'safeguard the human rights of sex workers and protect them from exploitation,' as well as to pursue public health goals.26 The law requires that all efforts be made to ensure the use of condoms in sex work, whether in brothels or otherwise, but infractions of those rules are not criminal offenses (articles 8 and 9). The law explicitly states that sex workers are covered under the ...more
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Whether sex work is criminalized or partly or wholly decriminalized or legalized, some governments have taken measures to mandate condom use in paid sex transactions. Often these take the form of 100% condomuse programs (CUP), which exist in Thailand, Cambodia, China, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Burma, among other countries" (7)
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Whether sex work is criminalized or partly or wholly decriminalized or legalized, some governments have taken measures to mandate condom use in paid sex transactions. Often these take the form of 100% condomuse programs (CUP), which exist in Thailand, Cambodia, China, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Burma, among other countries" (7)
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Whether sex work is criminalized or partly or wholly decriminalized or legalized, some governments have taken measures to mandate condom use in paid sex transactions. Often these take the form of 100% condomuse programs (CUP), which exist in Thailand, Cambodia, China, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Burma, among other countries" (7)
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: Laos
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Whether sex work is criminalized or partly or wholly decriminalized or legalized, some governments have taken measures to mandate condom use in paid sex transactions. Often these take the form of 100% condomuse programs (CUP), which exist in Thailand, Cambodia, China, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Burma, among other countries" (7)
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: Mongolia
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Whether sex work is criminalized or partly or wholly decriminalized or legalized, some governments have taken measures to mandate condom use in paid sex transactions. Often these take the form of 100% condomuse programs (CUP), which exist in Thailand, Cambodia, China, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Burma, among other countries" (7)
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Whether sex work is criminalized or partly or wholly decriminalized or legalized, some governments have taken measures to mandate condom use in paid sex transactions. Often these take the form of 100% condomuse programs (CUP), which exist in Thailand, Cambodia, China, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Burma, among other countries" (7)
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Whether sex work is criminalized or partly or wholly decriminalized or legalized, some governments have taken measures to mandate condom use in paid sex transactions. Often these take the form of 100% condomuse programs (CUP), which exist in Thailand, Cambodia, China, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Burma, among other countries" (7)
Oct. 13, 2014, 9:36 p.m.
Countries: Greece
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"In May, the authorities arrested and reportedly forcibly tested for HIV over 100 alleged sex-workers. Serious concerns were expressed over the stigmatization of 29 of the arrested after their personal details including their HIV status and photographs were published by police and charges were brought against them for intentionally causing serious bodily harm. At the end of the year, 12 of them remained in prison, awaiting trial" (108)
Feb. 7, 2014, 1:57 p.m.
Countries: Hungary
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Local governments have the authority to designate so-called tolerance zones where sex workers can work provided that they possess a valid three-month hygiene card (which can be obtained upon producing negative test results from a local sexually transmitted infection screening center) and a private entrepreneur license (needed for taxation). Sex workers offering or providing their services outside the designated tolerance zones are considered to be committing a minor criminal offense and thus may be arrested and fined" (65).
July 16, 2013, 10:12 a.m.
Countries: Brazil
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"The campaign aimed to promote safe sex and reduce the stigma against sex workers. Other posters in the campaign carried slogans such as "I cannot be seen without a condom, my love."[...]"The role of the [Healthy] ministry is to have specific content to encourage prevention among sex workers, who are a very vulnerable group," he said" (1)
June 25, 2012, 11:09 a.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"The only requirement needed for its exercise is to have periodical examinations and a health card. This only demonstrates that the well being of men soliciting these services is being safeguarded" (4). "To date, the activity of prostitution is legal and regulated Government Agreement 342-86. The primary requirement for exercise is the health card and periodic reviews" (19)
June 14, 2012, 11:32 a.m.
Countries: Austria
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Obligatory health controls are regulated at the federal level, but are limited to checking for so-called “work-related” diseases (client protection?). At the same time prostitutes are being excluded from the health system in general" (4). "Obligatory health controls for registered prostitutes are regulated at the federal level, these controls are, however, limited to checking for so-called “work-related” diseases. (STD BGBl.591/1193, AIDS-Law BGBl 293/1986 – 728/11993). In this way, prostitutes are subject to strict controls for sexually transmitted diseases which stigmatizes and discriminates against these women as being carriers of STDs, while they are otherwise excluded from the health system. According to tax law, prostitutes have since 1983 been subject to ...more
May 30, 2012, 2:57 p.m.
Countries: Costa Rica
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"The Unit on Prevention and Control of STIs and HIV/AIDS provides direct services to male and female sex workers and treats STIs in men as a result of spontaneous demand within CCSS" (157)
May 22, 2011, 9:25 p.m.
Countries: Botswana
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"The Committee is especially concerned that the persistence of unequal power relations between women and men and the inferior status of girls and women hamper their ability to negotiate safe sexual practices and increases their vulnerability to infection. The Committee is further concerned about the number of child-headed households of orphans of the HIV/AIDS crisis, where girls have disproportionate responsibilities that make them vulnerable to HIV/AIDS and prostitution" (9)
April 6, 2011, 5:59 p.m.
Countries: Chile
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Members expressed concern regarding the situation of women prostitutes and their vulnerability to violence. In reply, the representative recognized that Law No.19.325 referred only to domestic violence and excluded prostitutes, which were under criminal law. She emphasized that in Chile the practice of prostitution was not condemned and added that sanitary control of women prostitutes was guaranteed. She agreed with the suggestion that studies and statistics on this specific group should be developed in order to focus policies and programmes, also in view of the danger of HIV infection of prostitutes" (4-5)
April 4, 2011, 5:01 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"The Committee urges the Government to design and implement poverty alleviation programmes so that women and girls do not have to resort to prostitution for their livelihoods. It recommends that the Government develop programmes to reintegrate prostitutes, raise public awareness and prevent such exploitation. Moreover, in the light of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Cameroon, full attention must be paid to the health services available to prostitutes" (4)
Feb. 25, 2011, 12:47 p.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"The Committee, while appreciating the State party's ratification in 2003 of the SAARC Convention on Preventing and Combating Trafficking in Women and Children for Prostitution, is concerned that no information has been provided in the report on the extent of trafficking in women and girls, or on measures taken to prevent and combat that phenomenon in the country. The Committee recommends that the State party increase efforts at cross-border and international cooperation to prevent and combat trafficking in women and girls. It urges the State party to collect data and to provide information in its next report on the extent of trafficking in women and girls, as well as measures ...more
Nov. 29, 2010, 2:10 p.m.
Countries: Botswana
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Commercial sex work is not legally recognised. Therefore involved persons are not protected from exploitation and other forms of abuse." (10) "There are challenges in dealing with prostitution in Botswana because it has not been legally defined." (38)
April 1, 2010, 3:43 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"a. Physical and sexual violence, any type of harm or suffering inflicted on a woman’s body, as well as prohibiting a woman from using methods for family planning or the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases—5 to 12 year prison term in accordance with the gravity of the crime" (15).
Jan. 13, 2010, 2:40 p.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

“There was no legislation providing for the granting of asylum and/or refugee status to persons who meet the definition of the 1951 U.N. Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol. In practice, the Government provided protection against refoulement, and applications for political asylum were supposed to be adjudicated on a case-by-case basis at the cabinet level. The Government asserted that all migrants who claimed asylum were interviewed by trained immigration officials; however, this was disputed by AI. The UNHCR reviewed the interview records of cases they were provided and offered recommendations on certain cases. Local and international human rights observers criticized the Government for failing to ...more
Sept. 16, 2009, 11:18 a.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Prostitution is illegal" (45).
July 1, 2009, 6:36 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: IRP-PRACTICE-3, IRP-LAW-3

"A 19-year-old prostitute working in an apartment that doubles as a brothel said she has up to eight clients a day. A woman awaits customers at a Beijing barber shop in 2008. Sex workers also ply their trade in barber shops. Working in the southern boom city of Shenzhen, a special economic zone just north of Hong Kong, she told CNN she worries about getting AIDS, but has her own prevention measures. "I always use condoms or take an injection. The medicine can prevent sexually transmitted diseases," she said. "Some girls do not use prevention measures, but we don't talk about that in public." This young woman, who would not ...more
Jan. 30, 2009, 6:54 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Prostitution is legal for women over 18 years of age if they register with municipal authorities and carry a health certificate. In practice the vast majority of prostitutes worked in the informal sector where they lacked health protection. NGOs reported that traffickers lured increasing numbers of underage women into prostitution. The law, which was not effectively enforced, provides penalties for those who derive financial benefits from trafficking in persons, Internet child pornography, and sexual tourism involving children. Penalties for pimps and clients of underage prostitutes range from four to eight years in prison. There was no information on the number of cases reported, prosecuted, or convicted" (Section 5).more
Jan. 8, 2009, 1:08 p.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

Prostitution is legal if individuals are at least 21 years of age, register with the police, carry a valid sanitary card, and test negative for sexually transmitted infections, although soliciting customers is illegal. NGOs working with prostitutes claimed that police targeted prostitutes for abuse and extortion. There were arrests of illegal foreign prostitutes, underage prostitutes, and pimps during the year (5).
Dec. 5, 2008, 11:05 a.m.
Countries: Ecuador
Variables: IRP-LAW-3

"Prostitution is legal for persons over the age of 18 so long as the businesses are registered with the government and follow health regulations. Trafficking in persons for prostitution was a problem." (para 98)