The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for LDS-LAW-1

Sept. 21, 2018, 5:23 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The National Committee for Human Rights has worked to establish the unit to receive complaints, including women’s complaints in general and the complaints of domestic workers who are subjected to violence. The unit sees to it that justice is done for women and ensures the rehabilitation of women, including foreign workers" (Pg 14). "The Sultanate’s initial national report stated that Oman is largely free of human trafficking and the exploitation of women in prostitution. The Sultanate is continuing efforts to counter such problems, which appear from time to time due to illegal immigration. It strengthened procedures for granting work or visit permits to preclude the importation of women for trafficking...more
Sept. 5, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Chile
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Committee notes with satisfaction the enactment of legislation improving the working conditions of domestic workers, with regard to their minimum wage, right to take public holidays and maternity leave, and bill No. 8292-13, which aims at regulating the weekly maximum hours of work" (7).
Sept. 5, 2018, 10:23 a.m.
Countries: Costa Rica
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"...the judiciary issued a series of instructions aimed at guaranteeing access to justice for migrant people. These recommendations include alternative ways of accrediting identity, together with inter-agency coordination measures, with to overcoming obstacles that face migrants and to guarantee access to justice...Moreover, in partnership with international organizations, a radial campaign was held and posters were placed to enable migrants, particularly women, to gain knowledge of its scope and thus enhance their access to justice without fear that their undocumented or irregular migratory status would be an obstacle for protection of their rights" (11). "In the same period, the judiciary issued circular 220-14, of 23 September 2014 to guarantee effective access...more
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"In an attempt to protect women from trafficking and abuse, the government maintained a minimum age for women traveling overseas for domestic employment, although the government lowered the minimum age from 30 to 24 in April. NGOs viewed the age ban as discriminator" (31).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"There were no known shelters specifically for victims of domestic violence, although a permanent shelter for domestic workers could house up to 400 victims. The Public Authority for Manpower operated the shelter, and, as of August, according to a government source, the shelter housed 340 victims and received approximately 200 victims per month. International and national organizations had relatively open access to workers residing in the shelter and reported adequate living conditions; however, observers accused male guards of abusing and sexually harassing some of the women" (23).
Aug. 20, 2018, 11:08 a.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Committee welcomes the adoption, in 2010, of the amended Migrant Workers and Overseas Filipinos Act of 1995 (Republic Act No. 10022) to protect migrant workers working in the State party. It is concerned, however, at the widespread exploitation and abuse of Filipina migrant workers working abroad, in particular as domestic workers, and the insufficient support provided to reintegrate those who return. The Committee also notes that the protection of migrant workers under ASEAN migration policies does not cover unskilled migrants, who constitute the majority of Filipina migrant workers" (page 11).
July 6, 2018, 6:49 p.m.
Countries: Uruguay
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-LAW-1, GEW-LAW-1

"As of 2008, in Act No. 18250 on migration, the crimes of human trafficking and migrant smuggling of migrants were for the first time classified using the definitions established by the United Nations’ Palermo Protocol. Article 80 of the Act extends to complainants, victims, relatives and witnesses in cases of human trafficking the provisions established on the participation of victims in judicial proceedings and the compensation provided for by Act No. 18026 on war crimes and crimes against humanity" (page 20).
June 26, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: New Zealand
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Migrant Exploitation Prevention Strategy is aimed at ensuring the fair treatment of all migrant workers. Interventions include education of migrant employees and employers of migrants through communication campaigns and the provision of targeted employment guides (including the aged care sector which has a particularly high proportion of migrant women workers). The guides include information on employment rights, employee responsibilities, health and safety, and communication issues in the workplace. The Labour Inspectorate and Immigration New Zealand’s compliance operations enforce and prosecute breaches of minimum employment standards such as minimum wage and holiday entitlements and offences under the Immigration Act 2009. In 2015 the Government passed the Immigration Amendment Act 2015...more
April 6, 2018, 10:56 a.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"We should not overlook the protection affirmed by the Kuwaiti legislature under the Penal Code, no. 16 (1960, amended) to ensure the fight against trafficking in persons and protect the rights of those who fall victim to this crime while on Kuwaiti territory. The Penal Code is replete with stipulations and provisions specifically designed to provide an umbrella of protection for workers’ rights and freedoms. Of these provisions, we might draw attention to articles nos. 186, 187, 190, 191, 192, 193 and 194. Furthermore, article 49 of Act no. 31 (1970), amending the Kuwaiti Penal Code, no. 16 (1960), outlaws all forms of coercion or exploitation of person or the...more
March 9, 2018, 8:51 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Djibouti, India, Niger, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Uganda, Vietnam
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-LAW-1

“Saudi Arabia has signed a number of bilateral agreements with the countries of origin of female domestic workers. The agreements serve the interests of all parties and prevent the exploitation and violation of the rights of female domestic workers. They have been concluded with India, Niger, Uganda, Djibouti, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Sri Lanka” (32).
March 9, 2018, 8:49 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Under the regulations, an employer may not assign a domestic worker to perform work that is not agreed in the contract or that endangers the worker's health or harms his/her dignity; nor may the worker be assigned to work for a third party. The regulations require the employer to: pay the worker the agreed wage at the end of each month without delay, with written documentation of the worker's receipt of the monthly wage; provide appropriate housing for the domestic worker; provide a daily rest and weekly break for the worker as agreed by the two parties; provide paid sick leave in the event of an illness; provide paid leave...more
March 7, 2018, 6:52 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Legal and policy developments in the area of foreign employment seek to minimize the potential for trafficking. Statutory provisions contained in the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment Act while ensuring that foreign employment is regulated, also address prevention of trafficking. For instance, all foreign employment agencies are required to be licensed and, non-compliance thereof is a penal offence. (sec. 24) Recruitment cannot be done without the approval of the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment (SLBFE) (sec.37). The contract between the employer abroad and the local employee is required to be certified by the SLBFE and the certified contract must be registered with the Ministry of Labour of the...more
Feb. 23, 2018, 8:47 p.m.
Countries: Moldova
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Generally, Moldovan migrants benefit to a very limited extent of health insurance, pay for time not worked (sick leave, rest) or social security at work. The vast majority of migrants have weekly rest days. But the situation differs greatly depending on the country in which migrants work" (Pg 33).
Feb. 16, 2018, 9:12 a.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Committee notes the efforts made by the State party to combat trafficking in persons, including the issuance of decrees to protect domestic workers from exploitation or trafficking and the provision of a temporary shelter, social and psychological programmes and legal aid to victims" (8-9). "The lack of systematically organized rehabilitation and reintegration measures, including access to counselling, medical treatment, psychological support and redress, including compensation, for victims of trafficking, in particular with regard to migrant women and women domestic workers" (9). "The Committee notes with appreciation the measures adopted by the State party to protect the rights of women migrant domestic workers, such as the issuance of a unified...more
Jan. 26, 2018, 5:38 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Committee welcomes the measures adopted by the State party to protect the rights of women migrant domestic workers, such as issuing unified standard contracts, placing such workers under the provisions of the Labour Code, regulating employment agencies, adopting a law criminalizing trafficking in persons, increasing the number of labour inspectors, setting up a hotline and establishing shelters for victims of abuse and exploitation" (Pg 14).
Jan. 23, 2018, 3:59 p.m.
Countries: Argentina
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The committee notes with concern...The lack of harmonization of provincial and federal legislation criminalizing trafficking in persons for purposes of forced labour and forced prostitution, which causes delays in prosecuting and sentencing traffickers" (8).
Jan. 20, 2018, 10:59 a.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Committee welcomes the commitment expressed by the State party’s delegation to adopting legislation that will confer rights and legal protection to domestic workers. Nevertheless, the Committee is concerned about the limited scope of application to domestic workers of Law No. 36/2012 governing labour in the private sector, given the many cases of violence, abuse and exploitation experienced by women migrant workers who are mainly employed as domestic workers in the State party. The Committee commends the State party for the adoption of decision No. 79 (2009), aimed at reforming the sponsorship system, but is concerned that conditions in employment contracts set by employers could undermine the purpose of the...more
Dec. 26, 2017, 10:52 p.m.
Countries: Panama
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The law prohibits all forms of forced labor of adults or children. The law establishes penalties of 15 to 20 years’ imprisonment for forced labor involving movement (either cross-border or within the country) and six to 10 years’ imprisonment for forced labor not involving movement"(29)
Aug. 26, 2017, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“The country’s visa sponsorship system, known as kafala, as well as the absence of labour law protections for domestic workers make migrant workers highly vulnerable to exploitation. The kafala creates an ‘unbreakable’ tie between the migrant worker and their employer, which means that the migrant worker’s visa is directly conditioned by the employer. This prohibits migrant workers from switching jobs, even if they face abuse at their workplace” (para 5-7). “A report from Human Rights Watch also stated that women who decide to escape their abusive employment [as domestic servants] often face legal penalties” (para 11). “In 2012, Oman promised the United Nations Human Rights Council to look for alternatives...more
May 1, 2017, 3:07 p.m.
Countries: Singapore
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The law requires employers provide either one rest day each week or compensation for female domestic workers" (31). "The government also enforced requirements for employers to provide one rest day per week or compensation for female domestic workers, and penalties include a fine of up to S$10,000 ($7,200) or 12 months in prison" (32). "Under the penal code, any employer of a female domestic worker or a member of the employer’s family, if convicted of certain offenses against the worker such as causing hurt or insulting the modesty of the worker, is liable to a penalty that is one and one-half times the usual penalty...Pregnancy is a breach of the...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:57 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"ETIP works in both ‘source’ communities from which migrants originate and are considered vulnerable to trafficking, and in ‘destination’ communities where migrants travel to, and where exploitation may take place. In addition, ETIP works closely with law enforcement agencies and other stakeholders in the identification and protection of trafficking victims" (3).
Jan. 4, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“The governors may prolong detentions; some migrants were administratively detained for several months without charges. Governors used this provision widely, including to incarcerate women allegedly to protect them from becoming potential victims of honor crimes, although the detainees posed no threat to public safety” (8). “The UN reported that the government generally cooperated with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), and humanitarian organizations in providing protection and assistance to internally displaced persons, refugees, returning refugees, asylum seekers, stateless persons, and other persons of concern” (17, 18). “On December 16, UNHCR and Human...more
Jan. 4, 2017, 1:13 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“The government’s priority was to find durable housing for the 55,732 IDP families. In 2014 the government provided housing to 3,024 families” (28). “The government provided almost no integration assistance for recognized refugees, so many relied on limited support from international agencies. The country’s only reception center with adequate services for asylum seekers had a capacity for 60 places, which was insufficient with the increase in asylum seekers during the previous two years” (29). “Employers exploited foreign nationals in agriculture, construction, prostitution, and domestic service. The low number of investigations into forced or compulsory labor, particularly involving human trafficking for sexual exploitation, was insufficient to deter violations” (49).more
Jan. 3, 2017, 9:59 p.m.
Countries: Brazil
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“The government provided assistance to Haitian migrants who entered the country in hope of securing employment and relief from economic conditions in Haiti. The government continued to issue humanitarian visas to Haitians entering the country in search of employment. The visas entitle them to receive health and social assistance, the right to work, and the right to remain for up to five years” (10).
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Malta
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“Lengthy delays in the judicial system and inadequate government programs for integrating migrants were the most significant human rights problem. Other problems included violence against women, child abuse, trafficking in persons, societal racial discrimination, forced labor, and substandard work conditions for irregular migrants. The government took steps to investigate, prosecute, and punish officials who committed abuses, whether in security services or elsewhere in the government” (1). “Authorities reported that undocumented migrants and asylum-seekers spent an average of two months in detention. As of September, two persons were in closed centers. Usually within less than two weeks after their detention, authorities moved “vulnerable individuals,” such as children, pregnant women, elderly persons,...more
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“Migrants and refugees lived in often inadequate or substandard shelters for extended periods and were vulnerable to forced labor and other abuses; unaccompanied minors were particularly at risk” (1). “The constitution provides for freedom of internal movement, foreign travel, emigration, and repatriation, and the government generally respected these rights. The government cooperated with UNHCR and other humanitarian organizations in providing protection and assistance to refugees, asylum seekers, stateless persons, and other persons of concern” (9). “The government also provided protection to individuals who may not qualify as refugees. Between January and October 20, the government provided humanitarian protection to 10,821 persons and subsidiary protection to 7,242 persons” (11). “On June...more
Nov. 7, 2016, 1:31 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The law deprives foreign workers, who comprised approximately one-half of the population, of many fundamental legal, social, and economic rights" (28). "The Migrant Workers Protection Society (MWPS) temporarily sheltered approximately 150 women, most of whom were domestic workers, including at least one woman who reported rape" (29). "The labor law covers foreign workers, except domestic workers, but enforcement was lax, and cases of debt bondage were common. There were also reports forced labor practices occurred among domestic workers and others working in the informal sector; labor laws did not protect most of these workers. In 2012 the government amended the labor law to provide domestic workers the right to see...more
July 27, 2016, 8:28 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The problem is hardly a secret. Two decades ago the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, along with California Rural Legal Assistance, a legal service program that promotes the interests of migrant laborers and the rural poor, created a joint project to concentrate on sexual harassment in the fields" (para 5). "But perhaps the biggest impediment to fighting harassment in the fields is America’s immigration policy itself. Federal regulations forbid legal aid organizations like California Rural Legal Assistance from directly representing undocumented people, and the illegal nature of their work situations makes it difficult for them to come forward. Finding a path toward documentation and legal employment for these women would also...more
July 20, 2016, 12:28 a.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"In a similar vein, under its Migrant Workers Act of 1995, the Philippines established a fund to enable migrant workers to access legal services in cases of violations or disputes, including with employers" (106).
July 20, 2016, 12:28 a.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"For example, in South Africa since 2003, employers are required to register domestic workers and make social security contributions for them" (106).