The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for LDS-LAW-1

Aug. 26, 2017, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“The country’s visa sponsorship system, known as kafala, as well as the absence of labour law protections for domestic workers make migrant workers highly vulnerable to exploitation. The kafala creates an ‘unbreakable’ tie between the migrant worker and their employer, which means that the migrant worker’s visa is directly conditioned by the employer. This prohibits migrant workers from switching jobs, even if they face abuse at their workplace” (para 5-7). “A report from Human Rights Watch also stated that women who decide to escape their abusive employment [as domestic servants] often face legal penalties” (para 11). “In 2012, Oman promised the United Nations Human Rights Council to look for alternatives ...more
May 1, 2017, 3:07 p.m.
Countries: Singapore
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The law requires employers provide either one rest day each week or compensation for female domestic workers" (31). "The government also enforced requirements for employers to provide one rest day per week or compensation for female domestic workers, and penalties include a fine of up to S$10,000 ($7,200) or 12 months in prison" (32). "Under the penal code, any employer of a female domestic worker or a member of the employer’s family, if convicted of certain offenses against the worker such as causing hurt or insulting the modesty of the worker, is liable to a penalty that is one and one-half times the usual penalty...Pregnancy is a breach of the ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:57 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"ETIP works in both ‘source’ communities from which migrants originate and are considered vulnerable to trafficking, and in ‘destination’ communities where migrants travel to, and where exploitation may take place. In addition, ETIP works closely with law enforcement agencies and other stakeholders in the identification and protection of trafficking victims" (3).
Jan. 4, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“The governors may prolong detentions; some migrants were administratively detained for several months without charges. Governors used this provision widely, including to incarcerate women allegedly to protect them from becoming potential victims of honor crimes, although the detainees posed no threat to public safety” (8). “The UN reported that the government generally cooperated with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), and humanitarian organizations in providing protection and assistance to internally displaced persons, refugees, returning refugees, asylum seekers, stateless persons, and other persons of concern” (17, 18). “On December 16, UNHCR and Human ...more
Jan. 4, 2017, 1:13 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“The government’s priority was to find durable housing for the 55,732 IDP families. In 2014 the government provided housing to 3,024 families” (28). “The government provided almost no integration assistance for recognized refugees, so many relied on limited support from international agencies. The country’s only reception center with adequate services for asylum seekers had a capacity for 60 places, which was insufficient with the increase in asylum seekers during the previous two years” (29). “Employers exploited foreign nationals in agriculture, construction, prostitution, and domestic service. The low number of investigations into forced or compulsory labor, particularly involving human trafficking for sexual exploitation, was insufficient to deter violations” (49).more
Jan. 3, 2017, 9:59 p.m.
Countries: Brazil
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“The government provided assistance to Haitian migrants who entered the country in hope of securing employment and relief from economic conditions in Haiti. The government continued to issue humanitarian visas to Haitians entering the country in search of employment. The visas entitle them to receive health and social assistance, the right to work, and the right to remain for up to five years” (10).
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Malta
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“Lengthy delays in the judicial system and inadequate government programs for integrating migrants were the most significant human rights problem. Other problems included violence against women, child abuse, trafficking in persons, societal racial discrimination, forced labor, and substandard work conditions for irregular migrants. The government took steps to investigate, prosecute, and punish officials who committed abuses, whether in security services or elsewhere in the government” (1). “Authorities reported that undocumented migrants and asylum-seekers spent an average of two months in detention. As of September, two persons were in closed centers. Usually within less than two weeks after their detention, authorities moved “vulnerable individuals,” such as children, pregnant women, elderly persons, ...more
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

“Migrants and refugees lived in often inadequate or substandard shelters for extended periods and were vulnerable to forced labor and other abuses; unaccompanied minors were particularly at risk” (1). “The constitution provides for freedom of internal movement, foreign travel, emigration, and repatriation, and the government generally respected these rights. The government cooperated with UNHCR and other humanitarian organizations in providing protection and assistance to refugees, asylum seekers, stateless persons, and other persons of concern” (9). “The government also provided protection to individuals who may not qualify as refugees. Between January and October 20, the government provided humanitarian protection to 10,821 persons and subsidiary protection to 7,242 persons” (11). “On June ...more
Nov. 7, 2016, 1:31 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The law deprives foreign workers, who comprised approximately one-half of the population, of many fundamental legal, social, and economic rights" (28). "The Migrant Workers Protection Society (MWPS) temporarily sheltered approximately 150 women, most of whom were domestic workers, including at least one woman who reported rape" (29). "The labor law covers foreign workers, except domestic workers, but enforcement was lax, and cases of debt bondage were common. There were also reports forced labor practices occurred among domestic workers and others working in the informal sector; labor laws did not protect most of these workers. In 2012 the government amended the labor law to provide domestic workers the right to see ...more
July 27, 2016, 8:28 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The problem is hardly a secret. Two decades ago the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, along with California Rural Legal Assistance, a legal service program that promotes the interests of migrant laborers and the rural poor, created a joint project to concentrate on sexual harassment in the fields" (para 5). "But perhaps the biggest impediment to fighting harassment in the fields is America’s immigration policy itself. Federal regulations forbid legal aid organizations like California Rural Legal Assistance from directly representing undocumented people, and the illegal nature of their work situations makes it difficult for them to come forward. Finding a path toward documentation and legal employment for these women would also ...more
July 20, 2016, 12:28 a.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"In a similar vein, under its Migrant Workers Act of 1995, the Philippines established a fund to enable migrant workers to access legal services in cases of violations or disputes, including with employers" (106).
July 20, 2016, 12:28 a.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"For example, in South Africa since 2003, employers are required to register domestic workers and make social security contributions for them" (106).
July 18, 2016, 9:54 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"In July 2013, Hawaii followed New York’s lead and became the second state to pass labour protections for domestic workers, followed by California in January 2014 and Massachusetts in July 2014" (67). "In the state of New York in the United States, the National Domestic Workers Alliance was successful in campaigning for one of the most progressive bills of rights for these workers in the world" (106).
June 27, 2016, 9:53 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Migrant workers enjoy rights as prescribed by law similar to Thai workers, including: (1) minimum wage, working hours and entitlements and benefits in accordance with the Labour Protection Act B.E. 2541 (1998), (2) rights and welfare benefits in accordance with the Social Security Act B.E.2533 (1990), (3) right to compensations from work-related illness or accidents in accordance with the Workmen’s Compensation Act B.E. 2537 (1994), and (4) repatriation fund for returning home after the expiration of contracts or upon being repatriated in accordance with the Migrant Work Act B.E. 2551 (2008). Thailand has incorporated human rights and humanitarian principles in its policies and measures concerning migrant workers and their families. ...more
June 10, 2016, 7:17 p.m.
Countries: Germany
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Federal Government’s ESF-programme 'Strong Careers — Mothers with a Migration Background Start Out' (see recommendation 37) aims to improve the careers and social integration of mothers with a migration background. It helps to counter stereotypes and outdated role models" (8). "Promoting the integration of migrant women into the labour market and simultaneously countering discrimination are matters of great concern to the Federal Government" (41).
May 4, 2016, 6:35 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government has introduced industry initiatives to improve labour conditions of workers in the shrimp industry. The 2014 National Shrimp Policy aims to maintain environmental and ecological balance, and empower women through employment generation" (97).
March 9, 2016, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Indian legislators are aware of the well-established plight of abandoned wives, and the problems they face which include domestic abuse. Women of the diaspora also face similar situations, yet have no established support structures or legal remedies. Today, in its attempt to engage with the NRI population, the Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs is considering a proposal to establish Overseas Indian Centres in USA, the Gulf countries and Malaysia, to start with, because these are the regions where there is a significant presence of Indians. Besides other activities, it is proposed that these Centres will extend “counselling facilities with the help of professional counsellors to those who face the problem ...more
Jan. 27, 2016, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"However, according to the federal government, these individuals have legal rights to fair working conditions and fair treatment 'under labour laws in most provinces and territories.' While the government also acknowledges that LCWs are vulnerable to exploitation, it recommends that employees must resolve disputes with employers privately" (16).
Jan. 20, 2016, 12:21 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"There is no legal requirement of registering your domestic worker on a municipal, provincial or national level” (para 55)
Jan. 15, 2016, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"These women were already doing care work in their home countries without any payment. Now they perform similar work in developed countries, this time in exchange for low wages, although higher than those available back home. States, such as the Philippines or Sri Lanka, even promote female migration by providing easier access for legally required permits or papers or by providing institutional support; for example, the six-month course at the Philippine Women’s University grants a housekeeper diploma" (para 13).
Jan. 15, 2016, 6:35 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-LAW-1, LDS-DATA-1

"These women were already doing care work in their home countries without any payment. Now they perform similar work in developed countries, this time in exchange for low wages, although higher than those available back home. States, such as the Philippines or Sri Lanka, even promote female migration by providing easier access for legally required permits or papers or by providing institutional support; for example, the six-month course at the Philippine Women’s University grants a housekeeper diploma. In the Philippines alone there are over 1,200 agencies that find 'appropriate' domestic workers for the first world’s moneyed families" (para 13).
Jan. 15, 2016, 6:33 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The establishment of the Ministry of Foreign Employment Promotion and Welfare, and the adoption of the Sri Lanka National Policy on Labour Migration which focuses on concerns of migrant women workers" (2)
Dec. 23, 2015, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The United States has extended wage and overtime protection to the nearly 2 million direct care workers who help elderly or disabled people in their homes" (para 6)
Dec. 23, 2015, 2:46 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"However, there have been some positive developments since ILO Convention 189 came into force six months ago, on September 5, 2013. Ratified by 12 Member states, the landmark convention created a strong momentum towards recognition that the world’s 53 million domestic workers are employees entitled to full labour rights, and not second class workers. Countries have begun to act, some of them taking small, others bigger steps in the right direction. In Thailand, for example, domestic workers no longer have to work on public holidays, while in Singapore, they are guaranteed a weekly day of rest, and Namibia is setting a minimum wage for domestic workers" (para 4-5)more
Dec. 23, 2015, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Singapore
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"However, there have been some positive developments since ILO Convention 189 came into force six months ago, on September 5, 2013. Ratified by 12 Member states, the landmark convention created a strong momentum towards recognition that the world’s 53 million domestic workers are employees entitled to full labour rights, and not second class workers. Countries have begun to act, some of them taking small, others bigger steps in the right direction. In Thailand, for example, domestic workers no longer have to work on public holidays, while in Singapore, they are guaranteed a weekly day of rest, and Namibia is setting a minimum wage for domestic workers" (para 4-5)more
Dec. 23, 2015, 2:43 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"In the Philippines, the new Domestic Workers Act sets out detailed rules and protection for domestic workers" (para 6)
Dec. 23, 2015, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"However, there have been some positive developments since ILO Convention 189 came into force six months ago, on September 5, 2013. Ratified by 12 Member states, the landmark convention created a strong momentum towards recognition that the world’s 53 million domestic workers are employees entitled to full labour rights, and not second class workers. Countries have begun to act, some of them taking small, others bigger steps in the right direction. In Thailand, for example, domestic workers no longer have to work on public holidays, while in Singapore, they are guaranteed a weekly day of rest, and Namibia is setting a minimum wage for domestic workers" (para 4-5)more
Dec. 23, 2015, 2:37 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"However, there have been some positive developments since ILO Convention 189 came into force six months ago, on September 5, 2013. Ratified by 12 Member states, the landmark convention created a strong momentum towards recognition that the world’s 53 million domestic workers are employees entitled to full labour rights, and not second class workers. Countries have begun to act, some of them taking small, others bigger steps in the right direction... In Bahrain, the new Labour Code includes a number of provisions for domestic workers" (para 4-5)
Dec. 21, 2015, 5:03 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"In 2011 a new ILO Convention specifically covering the rights of domestic workers came into force. Thus far it has been ratified by 16 countries – only one (the Philippines) in the Asia–Pacific region and none in the Middle East. Ratifying Convention No. 189 is important, not just because it obliges governments to bring their national laws and enforcement systems into line, but also because it sends a message to societies that domestic workers have rights as other workers do" (para 14)
Dec. 21, 2015, 4:59 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"In 2011 a new ILO Convention specifically covering the rights of domestic workers came into force. Thus far it has been ratified by 16 countries – only one (the Philippines) in the Asia–Pacific region and none in the Middle East. Ratifying Convention No. 189 is important, not just because it obliges governments to bring their national laws and enforcement systems into line, but also because it sends a message to societies that domestic workers have rights as other workers do" (para 14)