The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for LDS-PRACTICE-1

Nov. 7, 2017, 9:21 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Climate change is making an already tough life even harder for many of the estimated 20 million people now crammed into heaving greater Dhaka. Its population continues to grow at nearly 5 percent a year as migrants - many of whom have lost their farms to worsening erosion, storms and sea-level rise - flood in seeking new work"(para 5)."Many slum residents find work at Dhaka's garment factories, earning about $50 per month of 12-hour shifts, or spend their days recycling plastic wrapping in sheds within the slum"(para 21). These data points are not specifically mentioning women but migration and factory work likely affect the women here (ENB-Coder Comment)more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Starting when the twins were 4 months old, he would from time to time take the children and kick her {Elham] out of the house, she said. She would intermittently take work as a domestic worker to have somewhere to stay"(7)
Aug. 26, 2017, 2:40 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"In order to protect its nationals from abusive employment, Indonesia has banned migration to Oman, as well as other countries with a similar history of migrant labour abuse" (para 19).
Aug. 26, 2017, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

“In order to escape poverty and support their families back home, thousands of domestic workers from South and South-East Asia migrate to Oman with the promise of stable employment in local households” (para 1). “In order to protect its nationals from abusive employment, Indonesia has banned migration to Oman, as well as other countries with a similar history of migrant labour abuse” (para 19).
July 20, 2017, 8:32 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Thousands of people – largely poor, rural women and children – are lured to India's towns and cities each year by traffickers who promise good jobs, but sell them into modern day slavery. Some end up as domestic workers, or forced to work in small industries such as textile workshops, farming or are even pushed into brothels where they are sexually exploited. In many cases, they are not paid or are held in debt bondage. Some go missing, and their families cannot trace them" (para 8-10).
June 23, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: Malta
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

According to data from The World Bank, in 2014, 95.6 percent of Maltese women had an account at a formal financial institution while 97.1 percent of men had one (TPJ – CODER COMMENT). According to data from The World Bank, 21.1 percent of Maltese women reported borrowing money, compared to 19.7 percent of men (TPJ – CODER COMMENT). According to data from The World Bank, 1.2 percent of Maltese women borrowed money to start, operate, or expand a farm or business compared to .7 percent of men (TPJ – CODER COMMENT). According to data from The World Bank, 15.6 percent of women took out a loan in 2011 compared to ...more
June 13, 2017, 8:53 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"A lack of employment opportunities back home [in the Philippines] means that even those with education and training often cannot find work back home, and many of the jobs that are available pay far less than a domestic worker earns in Hong Kong. This economic disparity forces these women to make an agonizing choice: leave the family and work abroad, or stay at home and risk a lifetime of poverty" (p 7-8)
April 21, 2017, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Netherlands
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"In Aruba forced laborers included Indian men and women working in retail stores, Caribbean and South American women working in domestic service…" (23).
March 28, 2017, 9:15 a.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, LDS-PRACTICE-1, MARR-PRACTICE-1

"One source claimed that traffickers subjected women to domestic servitude and sex trafficking through forced marriages" (15).
March 24, 2017, 1:19 p.m.
Countries: Czech Republic
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"There were reports that men and women, including migrant workers, were subjected to forced labor, typically through debt bondage" (27).
March 24, 2017, 1:11 p.m.
Countries: Haiti
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"An estimated 225,000 children worked as restaveks in urban areas of the country. Most restaveks were girls between the ages of five and 17 years...Girls were often placed in domestic servitude in private urban homes by parents who were unable to provide for them, while boys more frequently were exploited for labor on farms. Restaveks who did not run away from families usually remained with them until the age of 14 years" (37).
March 16, 2017, 1:46 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Camp migrants who work in the local area’s lemon and orange groves report their earnings as 15 euros (about $17) a day" (para 6). 20% of the camp residents are women (KH- CODER COMMENT).
March 16, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Guinea
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Smaller numbers of girls, mostly migrants from neighboring countries, were subjected to domestic servitude" (30).
Feb. 23, 2017, 9:45 a.m.
Countries: Equatorial Guinea
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Men and women from Cameroon, Benin, and other neighboring countries, as well as from the Dominican Republic and Cuba, were recruited for work, and some were subsequently subjected to forced labor. Often they were not compensated as agreed, and their passports were confiscated" (28).
Feb. 2, 2017, 12:53 p.m.
Countries: Chile
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Forced labor continued to occur. Foreign citizens, including men, women, and children, were subjected to forced labor in the mining, agriculture, domestic service, and hospitality sectors" (20).
Feb. 1, 2017, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Among them are two sisters, Prabhati and Shashi Das. They have come from a village at the end of a road, a place so conservative that the single time they went to a movie theater, their male cousins and uncles created a human chain around them, their big hands linked, to protect them from any contact with outside men. They are, as far as they know, the first unmarried women who have ever migrated from the village to work" (para 8). "He is recruiting rural workers through the government program because he is desperate: City-dwellers are no longer interested in factory jobs like these, with their low pay and punishing ...more
Jan. 30, 2017, 4:13 p.m.
Countries: Chad
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, MARR-PRACTICE-1

"According to the Chadian Women Lawyers’ Association, girls sold or forced into child marriages were forced by their husbands into domestic servitude and agricultural labor" (25).
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:59 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"With limited opportunities for safe and legal migration in the GMS [Greater Mekong Sub-region], irregular migration is widespread, creating opportunities for the trafficking and exploitation of migrants… While the full scale of human trafficking is difficult to ascertain due to the illegal and often undetected nature of the crime, there is substantial evidence that children, youth and adults from the GMS can find themselves in diverse forms of trafficking both in their own and other countries, including forced or bonded labour, child labour, sexual exploitation, domestic servitude or forced marriage" (3). "Thai citizens surveyed had contact with migrant workers in various ways, most commonly at their place of work. Thais ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"With limited opportunities for safe and legal migration in the GMS [Greater Mekong Sub-region], irregular migration is widespread, creating opportunities for the trafficking and exploitation of migrants… While the full scale of human trafficking is difficult to ascertain due to the illegal and often undetected nature of the crime, there is substantial evidence that children, youth and adults from the GMS can find themselves in diverse forms of trafficking both in their own and other countries, including forced or bonded labour, child labour, sexual exploitation, domestic servitude or forced marriage" (3).
Jan. 25, 2017, 9:40 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

" More than 130,000 women have left their home countries to work in Oman as migrant domestic workers, cooking, cleaning and caring for children while living in their employers’ homes. But behind closed doors, many of these women are beaten, starved, and forced to work up to 21 hours in a day" (para 1). "According to official Omani data, about a quarter of Omani families have a domestic worker, but this figure could be far higher as lots of people hire undocumented workers" (para 2).
Jan. 18, 2017, 10:01 a.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"There were reports that employers subjected noncitizen or foreign-born men and women to forced labor in the agricultural sector, food processing, cleaning services, hospitality, and construction industries and in domestic service. NGOs reported that bonded labor, particularly in the construction industry, and domestic servitude constituted the majority of cases of forced labor" (24).
Jan. 18, 2017, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Relatives often employed rural youth, especially girls, as domestic helpers, and these jobs seldom allowed time for school" (44).
Jan. 4, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

“Legal and societal discrimination against persons of Palestinian origin remained widespread. The government restricted labor rights and local and international human rights organizations reported frequent abuse of foreign domestic workers” (1). “On December 16, UNHCR and Human Rights Watch reported that the government rounded up more than 800 Sudanese nationals in front of UNHCR offices in Amman. As many as 80 percent of this group may have been refugees and asylum seekers, according to international organizations. The group was held near the airport, during which time a riot broke out. Security forces responded with force and sent 121 Sudanese to the hospital. On December 18, 525 Sudanese, including unaccompanied minors ...more
Jan. 4, 2017, 1:13 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, CWC-DATA-4

“While the government did not keep specific statistics of migrant laborers in Georgia, during the year the Public Services Development Agency issued 7,391 work residence permits and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued 3,408 work visas. According to the International Organization for Migration, most migrant workers in the country were either employed at large, foreign-financed projects where they lived at the worksite, or arrived in the country without previously secured employment” (52).
Jan. 3, 2017, 9:59 p.m.
Countries: Brazil
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

“The government provided assistance to Haitian migrants who entered the country in hope of securing employment and relief from economic conditions in Haiti. The government continued to issue humanitarian visas to Haitians entering the country in search of employment. The visas entitle them to receive health and social assistance, the right to work, and the right to remain for up to five years” (10). “Sub-standard working conditions of Bolivian immigrants in the garment industry continued, principally in the city of Sao Paulo. Immigrants from Paraguay, Peru, China, and South Korea were also reported to be working in forced labor situations in the garment industry” (27).
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Malta
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, CWC-DATA-4

“Lengthy delays in the judicial system and inadequate government programs for integrating migrants were the most significant human rights problem. Other problems included violence against women, child abuse, trafficking in persons, societal racial discrimination, forced labor, and substandard work conditions for irregular migrants. The government took steps to investigate, prosecute, and punish officials who committed abuses, whether in security services or elsewhere in the government” (1). “Authorities reported that undocumented migrants and asylum-seekers spent an average of two months in detention. As of September, two persons were in closed centers. Usually within less than two weeks after their detention, authorities moved “vulnerable individuals,” such as children, pregnant women, elderly persons, ...more
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2

“Migrants and refugees lived in often inadequate or substandard shelters for extended periods and were vulnerable to forced labor and other abuses; unaccompanied minors were particularly at risk” (1). “Forced labor occurred during the year. Workers were subjected to debt bondage in construction, domestic service, hotels, restaurants, and agriculture, especially in the south. Chinese men and women were forced to work in textile factories, and persons with disabilities from Romania and Albania were coerced into begging” (20). “On June 5, police arrested seven recruiters of migrant day laborers in Reggio Calabria on charges of labor exploitation and employment of irregular workers. The laborers had been subjected to humiliating treatment and ...more
Dec. 16, 2016, 11:19 a.m.
Countries: Botswana
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"There were reports of forced child labor in cattle herding and in domestic servitude, including using the labor of migrant children from Zimbabwe" (23).
Dec. 6, 2016, 10:52 a.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Migrant workers from India who worked in the country’s construction and hydropower sectors and Indian women and girls who worked in domestic service or as caregivers were vulnerable to forced labor" (18).
July 27, 2016, 8:28 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Across the country, some 400,000 women, mostly immigrants, work in agriculture, toiling in fields, nurseries and packing plants. Such work is backbreaking and low-paying. But for many of these women, it is also a nightmare of sexual violence" (para 1)