The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for LDS-PRACTICE-1

April 4, 2018, 4:40 p.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee is concerned: ...That most women in the agricultural and informal sectors, older women and minority women have limited access to full social protection and have limited access to training opportunities and financial resources, such as formal credits through bank loans, income and pension and social security schemes, compared with men" (11).
April 3, 2018, 10:42 p.m.
Countries: Madagascar
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee is concerned at the precarious working conditions of women domestic workers, including women migrant workers abroad, and their heightened risk of being exposed to abuse and trafficking for sexual and labour exploitation. The Committee is also concerned that women and girls migrating abroad are often victimized by fraudulent recruitment agencies and brokers and face barriers in filing complaints and gaining access to justice. The Committee recommends that the State party: (a) Ratify the Domestic Workers Convention, 2011 (No. 189), of the International Labour Organization; (b) Ensure that women domestic workers, including women migrant workers, have access to social protection and other employment -related benefits; (c) Effectively regulate and ...more
March 21, 2018, 5:20 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, CWC-DATA-4, IRP-PRACTICE-1, IRP-PRACTICE-4

"The Committee welcomes the adoption of the Child Care and Protection Act of 2015, which contains a chapter on combating trafficking in children; the inclusion of human trafficking among the 12 areas of focus in the revised National Gender Policy; and the use of the Prevention of Organized Crime Act of 2004 to combat trafficking in human beings as well as in the first criminal conviction in 2015 involving a case of human trafficking. The Committee is concerned, however, that the State party remains a source and destination country for trafficking in human beings, in particular women and girls, mainly for purposes of forced labour and sexual exploitation. The Committee ...more
March 14, 2018, 6:54 p.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-LAW-3, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, IRP-PRACTICE-4, IRP-LAW-1, IRP-LAW-2

"The Committee welcomes the adoption of Law No. 2005-06 of 10 May 2005 on combating trafficking in persons and similar practices and the protection of victims and of a national plan to combat trafficking in persons, in particular women and children, in 2009. It is concerned, however, about: (a) The absence of a clear definition of trafficking in persons in the national legislative framework; (b) The lack of data on the extent of trafficking in women and girls to, from and transiting through the State party; (c) Cases of trafficking of women and girls who are domestic workers, 'Internet brides' and women and girls subjected to forced labour, sexual exploitation, ...more
March 14, 2018, 12:08 p.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-3, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, IRP-PRACTICE-4, IRP-LAW-2

"While welcoming the adoption of the People Trafficking and People Smuggling (Prohibition) Act in 2009, the Committee remains concerned that the State party is a country of origin, transit and destination for trafficked women and girls, mainly for sexual exploitation and domestic labour. The Committee is also concerned at the lack of data on the extent of trafficking in persons and at the absence of specific programmes to raise awareness of the existence of a national referral mechanism on human trafficking in the State party. It is further concerned that the prohibition of prostitution under the Crimes Act does not criminalize the demand for prostitution. The Committee is also concerned ...more
March 13, 2018, 10:57 p.m.
Countries: Norway
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Since 2012, exploitation of women or girls in households has increased, particularly within the au pair system. Among au pairs believed to have been exploited, exploitation was in the form of forced labour. Reports concerning au pairs subjected to forced labour have increased. The system is controversial, partly due to claims that Norwegian families abuse the system to acquire underpaid domestic help, particularly from the Philippines" (12-13).
March 9, 2018, 8:51 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Djibouti, India, Niger, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Uganda, Vietnam
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-LAW-1

“Saudi Arabia has signed a number of bilateral agreements with the countries of origin of female domestic workers. The agreements serve the interests of all parties and prevent the exploitation and violation of the rights of female domestic workers. They have been concluded with India, Niger, Uganda, Djibouti, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Sri Lanka” (32).
March 9, 2018, 8:49 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

“Saudi Arabia has signed a number of bilateral agreements with the countries of origin of female domestic workers. The agreements serve the interests of all parties and prevent the exploitation and violation of the rights of female domestic workers. They have been concluded with India, Niger, Uganda, Djibouti, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Sri Lanka” (32).
Feb. 28, 2018, 5:36 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Kenya has been noted as a source, transit, and destination country for trafficking of men, women, and children. Trafficked Kenyan adults are exploited in involuntary domestic servitude and forced prostitution. Kenyan men, women, and children migrate to the Middle East, other East African nations, and Europe under different circumstances in search of employment, where they are exploited in domestic servitude, massage parlours and brothels, and forced manual labour, including in the construction industry" (19). "Cases of women being offered jobs abroad and instead ending up as slaves (including sexual slaves) have been in the increase in Kenya. The countries into which women are mostly trafficked to the Middle East" (19). ...more
Feb. 23, 2018, 8:47 p.m.
Countries: Moldova
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"In general, both international instruments and national legislation governing labor migration do not make specific references to gender, as they do not use explicitly such terms as 'wife or husband' instead of 'spouse', 'daughter or son' instead of children, 'man or woman' instead of a migrant. However, indirect factors such as gender stereotypes and gender differences are obvious. For example, while the regulations on the right to stay in the country admit migrants for certain occupations and there is gender segregation in these sectors, migrants admitted as seasonal farm or construction workers are mostly men, as women migrants usually prevail in the service sector. However, in these circumstances, we find ...more
Feb. 16, 2018, 9:12 a.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, LDS-PRACTICE-1

"It is concerned, however, that the State party remains a destination and transit country for women trafficked predominantly from South and East Asia and East and North Africa for the purposes of forced labour, domestic servitude and, to a lesser extent, sexual exploitation" (9).
Jan. 20, 2018, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"The migration of young women out of Benin City began in the nineteen-eighties, when Edo women—fed up with repression, domestic chores, and a lack of economic opportunities—travelled to Europe by airplane, with fake documents. Many ended up doing sex work on the streets of major cities—London, Paris, Madrid, Athens, Rome" (para 18).
Jan. 20, 2018, 10:59 a.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee welcomes the State party’s efforts through the National Committee to Combat Trafficking in Persons, increased labour inspections, bilateral cooperation with countries of origin and the provision of psychological assistance to and physical protection for victims. The Committee reiterates its concern, however, about the prevalence and extent of trafficking of girls and women into the State party for purposes of forced labour and/or sexual exploitation" (pg 6).
Jan. 17, 2018, 4:15 p.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2

On July 1, 2002, comprehensive legislation that imposed criminal liability for trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes entered into force in Sweden. On July 1, 2004, in order to be compliant with and implement the United Nations Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, amendments were made to extend criminalization to all forms of trafficking in persons, including trafficking within national borders and for the purpose of, for example, forced labour, war service or exploitation for removal of organs. In 2006, the government appointed an Expert Commission with the task to develop and strengthen the existing anti-trafficking legislation. In April 2008, the government ...more
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Those who watch TV are less likely to agree with the practice of baad (the practice of giving away a daughter to another party as penalty or payment for an offence); 14.6 percent vs 29.8 percent, respectively" (para 10) (Coder comment - in the practice of baad, the exchanged daughters become either servants or brides - ARR).
Dec. 26, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: Nicaragua
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-4, IRP-PRACTICE-1, IRP-PRACTICE-2, IRP-DATA-2, SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There were anecdotal reports that [in Panama] Chinese citizens were forced to work in grocery stores and laundries in situations of debt bondage, as well as reports that Nicaraguan and Colombian women were subjected to domestic servitude. According to leaders of the Central General Autonomy for Workers, forced labor continued to be a growing problem, particularly in the commercial sex industry"(29-30)
Dec. 26, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: Colombia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-4, IRP-PRACTICE-1, IRP-PRACTICE-2, IRP-DATA-2, SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There were anecdotal reports that [in Panama] Chinese citizens were forced to work in grocery stores and laundries in situations of debt bondage, as well as reports that Nicaraguan and Colombian women were subjected to domestic servitude. According to leaders of the Central General Autonomy for Workers, forced labor continued to be a growing problem, particularly in the commercial sex industry"(29-30)
Dec. 26, 2017, 10:52 p.m.
Countries: Panama
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"The law prohibits all forms of forced labor of adults or children. The law establishes penalties of 15 to 20 years’ imprisonment for forced labor involving movement (either cross-border or within the country) and six to 10 years’ imprisonment for forced labor not involving movement"(29). "There were anecdotal reports that Chinese citizens were forced to work in grocery stores and laundries in situations of debt bondage, as well as reports that Nicaraguan and Colombian women were subjected to domestic servitude. According to leaders of the Central General Autonomy for Workers, forced labor continued to be a growing problem, particularly in the commercial sex industry"(29-30)
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:37 p.m.
Countries: China, Vietnam
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, IRP-DATA-1

"During CNN's trip to the border, the government called and told us the police had just rescued five girls as they were about to cross the border with a trafficker. We met the girls, who are just 14 years old. They said they were promised $600 to go to work in China by a neighbor from the same village" (para 26).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Reducing poverty will help stop women going to China seeking work, another common way traffickers lure victims" (para 25).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Reducing poverty will help stop women going to China seeking work, another common way traffickers lure victims" (para 25).
Nov. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"It’s a problem intertwined with a reluctance to let outsiders into the country. Labor costs are high in Japan, making child care and nannies far beyond the economic reach of many families. Japan has only recently begun relaxing rules on allowing in domestic workers from countries like the Philippines, who could help provide lower-cost child care as they do in Singapore and Hong Kong" (para 8).
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"While precise data are lacking, UNRISD estimates that by 2002 there were at least 1.3 million foreign women working in the major labor-importing countries in East and Southeast Asia, including Japan, the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. These women constituted a high proportion of the total immigrant labor force in some of these countries (UNRISD 2005, p.115)"(23)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:32 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999). Female migrants formed threequarters of those migrating from Sri Lanka, and over half of those migrating from the Philippines in recent years (United Nations Research Institute for Social Development [UNRISD] 2005). They often become part of heavily segmented employment markets (Salazar Parrenas 2001)"(22-23)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:02 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999)"(22)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:37 p.m.
Countries: Malaysia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-DATA-1

"In countries such as Malaysia and Sri Lanka, young women in particular out-migrate to urban centers to work at transnational production sites or free trade zones. Well-documented tensions are often created between the traditional values of the peasant society from which the women originate and the values at industrial sites where they work (Ong 1987)"(22)."Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999). Female migrants formed threequarters of those migrating from Sri Lanka, and over half of those migrating from the Philippines in recent years (United Nations Research Institute for Social Development [UNRISD] 2005). They often become part of heavily segmented employment markets (Salazar Parrenas 2001)"(22-23)
Nov. 27, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"On paper, the law is clear: men and women enjoy equal property rights under Afghanistan's 2004 constitution. But on-the-ground reality says otherwise as a combination of tradition and customary laws keep most Afghan women unaware of their land rights and far from owning property. As the Afghan Ministry of Justice estimates, 90 percent of Afghans decide land rights according to customary laws – regulations developed and instituted at the regional and tribal level. For this reason, few Afghan women are able to capitalize on their right to inherit and own property. While customary law varies throughout the country, it typically pressures a woman to relinquish her share of an inheritance ...more
Nov. 7, 2017, 9:21 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Climate change is making an already tough life even harder for many of the estimated 20 million people now crammed into heaving greater Dhaka. Its population continues to grow at nearly 5 percent a year as migrants - many of whom have lost their farms to worsening erosion, storms and sea-level rise - flood in seeking new work"(para 5)."Many slum residents find work at Dhaka's garment factories, earning about $50 per month of 12-hour shifts, or spend their days recycling plastic wrapping in sheds within the slum"(para 21). These data points are not specifically mentioning women but migration and factory work likely affect the women here (ENB-Coder Comment)more