The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for LDS-PRACTICE-2

April 20, 2018, 1:18 a.m.
Countries: Spain
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"That the legislative amendment to Royal Legislative Decree No.16/2012 excluded migrants in irregular situations from universal health coverage and had a disproportionate impact on migrant women because it deprived them of free access to sexual and reproductive health services. It therefore represented an opportunity lost to identify victims of gender-based violence and trafficking and to provide support to victims of sexual violence" (9-10).
April 4, 2018, 4:40 p.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The Committee notes that internal and cross-border migration has rapidly increased in recent years. In that context, the Committee is concerned: (a) That internal migrant workers, including women and girls, face barriers in gaining access to basic social services guaranteed to all Vietnamese citizens; (b) That migrant women and girls, especially women domestic workers, are at a high risk of sexual and labour exploitation; (c) That women and girls migrating abroad are often victimized by fraudulent recruitment agencies and brokers for international marriage; (d) That migrant women who are victims of exploitation and violence face barriers in filing complaints and gaining access to justice" (9).
April 3, 2018, 10:42 p.m.
Countries: Madagascar
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2, CWC-DATA-4

The Committee is concerned at the precarious working conditions of women domestic workers, including women migrant workers abroad, and their heightened risk of being exposed to abuse and trafficking for sexual and labour exploitation. The Committee is also concerned that women and girls migrating abroad are often victimized by fraudulent recruitment agencies and brokers and face barriers in filing complaints and gaining access to justice. The Committee recommends that the State party: (a) Ratify the Domestic Workers Convention, 2011 (No. 189), of the International Labour Organization; (b) Ensure that women domestic workers, including women migrant workers, have access to social protection and other employment -related benefits; (c) Effectively regulate and ...more
March 14, 2018, 6:54 p.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-LAW-3, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, IRP-PRACTICE-4, IRP-LAW-1, IRP-LAW-2

"The Committee welcomes the adoption of Law No. 2005-06 of 10 May 2005 on combating trafficking in persons and similar practices and the protection of victims and of a national plan to combat trafficking in persons, in particular women and children, in 2009. It is concerned, however, about: (a) The absence of a clear definition of trafficking in persons in the national legislative framework; (b) The lack of data on the extent of trafficking in women and girls to, from and transiting through the State party; (c) Cases of trafficking of women and girls who are domestic workers, 'Internet brides' and women and girls subjected to forced labour, sexual exploitation, ...more
March 14, 2018, 12:08 p.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-3, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, IRP-PRACTICE-4, IRP-LAW-2

"While welcoming the adoption of the People Trafficking and People Smuggling (Prohibition) Act in 2009, the Committee remains concerned that the State party is a country of origin, transit and destination for trafficked women and girls, mainly for sexual exploitation and domestic labour. The Committee is also concerned at the lack of data on the extent of trafficking in persons and at the absence of specific programmes to raise awareness of the existence of a national referral mechanism on human trafficking in the State party. It is further concerned that the prohibition of prostitution under the Crimes Act does not criminalize the demand for prostitution. The Committee is also concerned ...more
March 13, 2018, 10:57 p.m.
Countries: Norway
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Since 2012, exploitation of women or girls in households has increased, particularly within the au pair system. Among au pairs believed to have been exploited, exploitation was in the form of forced labour. Reports concerning au pairs subjected to forced labour have increased. The system is controversial, partly due to claims that Norwegian families abuse the system to acquire underpaid domestic help, particularly from the Philippines. As a result, the Au Pair Centre — On Equal Terms was opened in January 2013. The centre is a place where both au pairs and host families can find information and advice, and the primary aim is to strengthen legal protection of au ...more
March 5, 2018, 8:53 a.m.
Countries: Costa Rica
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"...it was detected that the fact that a person lacks documents considered appropriate by the judicial authorities, is a major obstacle for migrant persons to be able to gain access to legal mechanisms to protect their basic fundamental rights. This problem is all the more serious when it involves issues as sensitive as domestic violence and alimony, where women are the main victims" (11).
Feb. 28, 2018, 5:36 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Cases of women being offered jobs abroad and instead ending up as slaves (including sexual slaves) have been in the increase in Kenya. The countries into which women are mostly trafficked to the Middle East. Women are often lured into these countries with the promises of well-paying jobs and a better quality of life. However, they are often subjected to difficult working conditions (often, not the types of jobs that they were promised), lack of freedom (their passports and other identification documents are often confiscated); lack of adequate pay for the work that they are expected to do. As a result of these problems, the Kenyan Government, in June 2012, ...more
Feb. 23, 2018, 8:47 p.m.
Countries: Moldova
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"However, in these circumstances, we find discrimination against women regarding the right to free choice of profession and employment, since in the countries of destination; migrants are employed to ENES works (avoided by the national workers, except the very poor). Migrant women are given the most vulnerable jobs. They get '3D jobs' - dirty, dangerous, degrading, in miserable, dangerous, degrading conditions. Many women migrant workers, particularly those in the domestic sector and leisure, are subject to various forms of abuse, such as non-observance of the terms of employment, sub-standard working and living conditions, restricted freedom of movement, physical, sexual or psychological abuse. Men enjoy better employment opportunities, from unskilled to ...more
Feb. 16, 2018, 9:12 a.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The Committee is concerned, however, about: (a) The fact that these measures have proved insufficient to ensure respect for the human rights of women migrant domestic workers, as evidenced by their exposure to economic and physical abuse and exploitation and the persistence of practices such as the confiscation of passports by employers and the apparent persistence of the de facto kafalah system, which further increase their risk of exploitation and make it difficult for them to change employers, even in cases of abuse; (b) The limited protection provided by Ministerial Decree No. 1/2011 concerning the issuance of regulations on the recruitment of non-Omani workers, the exclusion of domestic workers from ...more
Feb. 14, 2018, 3:56 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The Committee...is concerned, however, about: (a) The continued labour exploitation faced by women migrant workers, in particular those in irregular situations working in the agricultural sector or as domestic workers, as well as women who are victims of sexual exploitation on agricultural farms; (b) The systematic failure of employers to comply with rules on occupational safety and minimum living conditions, and the lack of effective labour inspections; (c) The absence of clear and effective procedures enabling women migrant workers to complain about abusive working conditions, including in relation to outstanding pay; (d) Difficulties for women migrant workers in gaining access to basic social services, in particular those provided by local ...more
Feb. 7, 2018, noon
Countries: Chile
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"However, the Committee expresses concern at the continuing precarious situation of domestic workers, in particular migrant women, the lack of implementation of the legal framework and the insufficient monitoring of their working conditions" (7).
Jan. 26, 2018, 5:38 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The harsh conditions and high risk of physical and sexual abuse faced by many girls engaged as domestic workers" (Pg 13). "The Committee is concerned, however, about: the fact that these measures have proved insufficient to ensure respect for the human rights of women migrant domestic workers, as evidenced by their high exposure to economic and physical abuse and exploitation and the persistence of practices such as the confiscation of passports by employers and the maintenance of the kafalah system, which further increase their risk of exploitation and make it difficult for them to leave abusive employers, Obstacles affecting women migrant domestic workers’ access to justice, including fear of expulsion ...more
Jan. 20, 2018, 10:59 a.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The Committee welcomes the commitment expressed by the State party’s delegation to adopting legislation that will confer rights and legal protection to domestic workers. Nevertheless, the Committee is concerned about the limited scope of application to domestic workers of Law No. 36/2012 governing labour in the private sector, given the many cases of violence, abuse and exploitation experienced by women migrant workers who are mainly employed as domestic workers in the State party. The Committee commends the State party for the adoption of decision No. 79 (2009), aimed at reforming the sponsorship system, but is concerned that conditions in employment contracts set by employers could undermine the purpose of the ...more
Jan. 17, 2018, 4:15 p.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2

On July 1, 2002, comprehensive legislation that imposed criminal liability for trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes entered into force in Sweden. On July 1, 2004, in order to be compliant with and implement the United Nations Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, amendments were made to extend criminalization to all forms of trafficking in persons, including trafficking within national borders and for the purpose of, for example, forced labour, war service or exploitation for removal of organs. In 2006, the government appointed an Expert Commission with the task to develop and strengthen the existing anti-trafficking legislation. In April 2008, the government ...more
Dec. 26, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: Nicaragua
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-4, IRP-PRACTICE-1, IRP-PRACTICE-2, IRP-DATA-2, SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There were anecdotal reports that [in Panama] Chinese citizens were forced to work in grocery stores and laundries in situations of debt bondage, as well as reports that Nicaraguan and Colombian women were subjected to domestic servitude. According to leaders of the Central General Autonomy for Workers, forced labor continued to be a growing problem, particularly in the commercial sex industry"(29-30)
Dec. 26, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: Colombia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-4, IRP-PRACTICE-1, IRP-PRACTICE-2, IRP-DATA-2, SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There were anecdotal reports that [in Panama] Chinese citizens were forced to work in grocery stores and laundries in situations of debt bondage, as well as reports that Nicaraguan and Colombian women were subjected to domestic servitude. According to leaders of the Central General Autonomy for Workers, forced labor continued to be a growing problem, particularly in the commercial sex industry"(29-30)
Dec. 26, 2017, 10:52 p.m.
Countries: Panama
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1, IRP-DATA-2

"There were anecdotal reports that Chinese citizens were forced to work in grocery stores and laundries in situations of debt bondage, as well as reports that Nicaraguan and Colombian women were subjected to domestic servitude. According to leaders of the Central General Autonomy for Workers, forced labor continued to be a growing problem, particularly in the commercial sex industry"(29-30)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:32 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999). Female migrants formed threequarters of those migrating from Sri Lanka, and over half of those migrating from the Philippines in recent years (United Nations Research Institute for Social Development [UNRISD] 2005). They often become part of heavily segmented employment markets (Salazar Parrenas 2001)"(22-23)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:02 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999)"(22)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:37 p.m.
Countries: Malaysia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2

"In countries such as Malaysia and Sri Lanka, young women in particular out-migrate to urban centers to work at transnational production sites or free trade zones. Well-documented tensions are often created between the traditional values of the peasant society from which the women originate and the values at industrial sites where they work (Ong 1987)"(22)."Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999). Female migrants formed threequarters of those migrating from Sri Lanka, and over half of those migrating from the Philippines in recent years (United Nations Research Institute for Social Development [UNRISD] 2005). They often become part of heavily segmented employment markets (Salazar Parrenas 2001)"(22-23)
Aug. 26, 2017, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

“Once they [domestic workers] arrive in Oman, new employers often seize their passports so that they cannot depart when they want, ultimately, denying them their freedom of movement. They are made subject to excessive working hours, sleep deprivation and starvation. Many suffer from verbal or sexual abuse. All too often, the money they work so hard for is denied to them. According to a report by Human Rights Watch, a great number of female migrant domestic workers fall prey to such abusive employment, and become Oman’s modern-day slaves” (para 2-4). “The country’s visa sponsorship system, known as kafala, … make migrant workers highly vulnerable to exploitation. The kafala creates an ...more
June 13, 2017, 8:54 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"This week, the Mission For Migrant Workers (MFMW) charity released findings from a survey of more than 3,000 domestic helpers in Hong Kong, which found that 43% of those surveyed are not provided with their own bedroom - with some reporting that they are forced to sleep in areas such as toilets, storage rooms or on the roof. This practice is against Hong Kong government guidelines which say that domestic helpers should be provided with ‘suitable accommodation and with reasonable privacy.’ Another study by Students Against Fees and Exploitation (SAFE) at the University of Hong Kong found that more than 70% of domestic helper recruitment agencies in Hong Kong are ...more
May 1, 2017, 3:07 p.m.
Countries: Singapore
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The Foreign Manpower Management Division assisted female domestic workers and operated a hotline to receive complaints" (32). "Under the penal code, any employer of a female domestic worker or a member of the employer’s family, if convicted of certain offenses against the worker such as causing hurt or insulting the modesty of the worker, is liable to a penalty that is one and one-half times the usual penalty. Nevertheless, there were regular reports of employers arrested for abuse or mistreatment of such workers" (33).
April 6, 2017, 11:13 a.m.
Countries: Libya
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Instability in the country and lack of government oversight made human trafficking a profitable enterprise. Conditions on boats departing for Europe were poor, and human smugglers abandoned many migrants in international waters with insufficient food and water. Migrants reported some human smugglers were Libyan nationals, but officials did little to curb the departures or hold smugglers accountable for crimes against migrants" (20).
March 16, 2017, 1:47 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"We were keenly aware of how violence against women is subsumed in the generic crimes of this humanitarian crisis, and we were also aware of the invisibility of female refugees in the media" (para 2). "In 2014, investigators uncovered a vast corruption scheme at Mineo. Organized crime groups had infiltrated the camp’s administration, and authorities arrested a local mafia leader. When I asked the director about reported occurrences of trafficking in the camps, he said that in the past there had been several cases that may have involved people from the camp but that camp management worked with police to prevent future incidents. Near the camp, however, is a blatant ...more
Feb. 23, 2017, 9:40 a.m.
Countries: El Salvador
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Women in domestic service and the industrial manufacturing sector for export industry, particularly in the export processing zones, faced exploitation, mistreatment, verbal abuse, threats, sexual harassment, and generally poor work conditions" (30).
Feb. 1, 2017, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Among them are two sisters, Prabhati and Shashi Das. They have come from a village at the end of a road, a place so conservative that the single time they went to a movie theater, their male cousins and uncles created a human chain around them, their big hands linked, to protect them from any contact with outside men. They are, as far as they know, the first unmarried women who have ever migrated from the village to work. Neighbors in the village are waiting to see what happens. The nasty ones say, with obvious relish, it will end badly. They whisper about migrant workers whose eyes were removed by ...more