The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for MARR-LAW-5

Sept. 22, 2017, 4:25 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Although it's illegal to get married under 18 in Jordan, the practice is increasingly common among Syrian refugees. In 2015, 35% of all Jordan marriages involved a minor, up from 18% in 2012, according to the Jordanian Higher Population Council, citing statistics from the Chief Islamic Justice Department. But religious judges in Jordan may authorize marriages involving children as young as 15, provided they believe the child’s best interests are taken into account"(para 7)
Sept. 22, 2017, 1:07 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Marriage in the Muslim community is a contract and it is open for women to insist on specific clauses in the nikahnama to protect their interests and dignity, the All-India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB) informed the Supreme Court on Tuesday....'The woman can also negotiate in the nikahnama and include provisions therein consistent with Islamic law to contractually stipulate that her husband does not resort to triple talaq, she has right to pronounce triple talaq in all forms, and ask for very high 'mehr' amount in case of talaq and impose such other conditions as are available to her in order to protect her dignity,' the Muslim law board said" ...more
Sept. 14, 2017, 12:28 p.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"In Israel, where all marriages are subject to religious law, this norm has left thousands of women in legal limbo due to husbands who refuse to grant divorces. In recent decades, the rabbinical courts have gained the authority to impose various sanctions against recalcitrant husbands"(para 4-5)."Israel's state-sanctioned rabbinate oversees many aspects of daily life for the Jewish majority, including marriage and divorce. There are no civil marriages, meaning that couples must marry or divorce according to religious law — or travel abroad for a civil ceremony. Some women's rights advocates say the religious laws stem from a patriarchal tradition and put the woman at a disadvantage. Christians and Muslims marry ...more
Aug. 10, 2017, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, DTCP-LAW-1

"There is no regulatory framework to deal with overall marriages and mainly the issue of child marriages amongst the non-Muslim minorities in Pakistan. All religious minority groups perform and register marriages according to their religious practices, and no consideration is given to the age of children. In 2011 and 2012, the previous federal government was pushing coalition partners for the enactment of the Hindu Marriage Bill 2011 which provided for the prohibition marriage of non-Muslim girls and boys below 18 years of age, it is dire need to formulate the policies of non-Muslims forced marriages registration act, to protect non-Muslims forced religion and forced marriages keeping in mind early/child marriages" ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Malaysia
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, AOM-DATA-1, DTCP-LAW-1

"Under Malaysia's civil laws, the legal minimum age for marriage is 18 but Muslim girls who are under 16 can obtain permission to marry from Islamic courts" (para 7).
Jan. 10, 2017, 6:36 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, ATDW-LAW-5

"The Registration of Customary Marriage and Divorce Act, the Domestic Violence Act and the Devolution of Estates Act, aiming at harmonizing national legislation with the Convention’s provisions, each in 2007" (2)
Jan. 10, 2017, 6:36 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"It is also concerned that other statutory and customary norms that discriminate against women remain in force, in particular those contained in...Customary law pertaining to marriage consent and women’s right to inheritance" (3)
Jan. 10, 2017, 6:36 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, ATDW-LAW-5, DV-LAW-1, CONST-LAW-1

"The Committee is particularly concerned that the highly debated section 27 (d) (4) of the Constitution, which provides that the prohibition of discrimination does not apply to adoption, marriage, divorce, burial, devolution of property on death and to other matters of personal law, not only discriminates against women, but also prevails over the Registration of Customary Marriage and Divorce Act, the Domestic Violence Act and the Devolution of Estates Act, thus defeating the efforts of the State party to comply with the Convention" (3)
Jan. 4, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

“Civil, criminal, and commercial courts accord equal weight to the testimony of men and women. On the other hand, in sharia courts, which have jurisdiction over Muslim marriage, divorce, and inheritance cases, the testimony of a woman has half the weight of a man’s” (10). “The law does not provide for the same legal status and rights for women as for men. Women experienced discrimination in a number of areas, including inheritance, divorce, child custody, citizenship, pension and social security benefits, the workplace, and, in certain circumstances, the value of their testimony in a sharia court” (32). “Women may seek divorce without the consent of their husbands in limited circumstances ...more
Jan. 3, 2017, 10:36 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Although the law does not restrict the right of adult women and men to marry, a 1998 Supreme Court directive prohibits legal officials from accepting petitions for marriages and from officiating over marriages between Burmese women and foreign men" (14). "On August 26, the government enacted the Buddhist Women Special Marriage law. The law stipulates notification and registration requirements for marriages between non-Buddhist men and Buddhist women and introduces new obligations to be observed by nonBuddhist husbands and penalties for noncompliance" (14). "In northern Rakhine State, local authorities required members of the Rohingya minority to obtain a permit to marry officially, a step not required of other ethnicities" (15).more
Nov. 17, 2016, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The rights of spouses to own, make use of, or dispose of property that is the joint property of members of large and small (dekhkan) farms are defined by the laws on large and dekhkan farms. The division of property on large and dekhkan farms is performed according to rules stipulated in articles 223 and 225 of the Civil Code" (43). "Article 13 of the Family Code has established that marriages are to be performed in civil registry offices. A marriage entered into in a religious ceremony has no legal significance" (43)
Nov. 15, 2016, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Turkey’s Constitutional Court announced May 29 that civil marriage is no longer a legal requirement for religiously married citizens, a decision that will have serious social implications. Many critics, especially women, fret that the ruling will pave the way for more violations of women's and children’s rights. The court based its decision on a case from 2014, when a criminal court in the Turkish province of Erzurum appealed a case to the Constitutional Court involving a religiously married couple without a civil marriage and the imam who carried out the ceremony. Prior to this latest decision, Paragraph 5 of Article 230 of the Turkish Criminal Code dictated a sentence of ...more
Sept. 13, 2016, 5:02 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

“Sayyd still insists on using her husband's surname, until she can end the marriage officially in an Indian court. But like many other women from India's large Sunni Muslim minority, her fate and status are governed by Muslim Personal Law that follows the tenets of the Islamic faith, as interpreted by local imams and religious schools across India” (para 4). “The so-called triple talaq, or instant divorce, has been banned in more than 20 Muslim countries, including neighboring Pakistan and Bangladesh. But in India, the practice is allowed thanks to the country's rules protecting Muslim, Christian and Hindu communities following religious law” (para 5). “Most of the 170 million Muslims ...more
Aug. 23, 2016, 5:14 p.m.
Countries: Switzerland
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"In 1926, the new Civil Code (from Switzerland) gave women a status of 'person' and therefore, equal rights to men in some aspects (including marriage, divorce, inheritance etc.) was adopted (in Turkey).It was under these new changes that religious and polygamous marriages were banned"(para 4)
Aug. 23, 2016, 5:13 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"In 1926, the new Civil Code (from Switzerland) gave women a status of 'person' and therefore, equal rights to men in some aspects (including marriage, divorce, inheritance etc.) was adopted.It was under these new changes that religious and polygamous marriages were banned"(para 4)
Aug. 16, 2016, 2:06 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The Zanzibar’s Kadhis’ Court Act, 1985 give power to the court to have and exercise jurisdiction in the determination questions of Muslim law relating to personal status, marriage, divorce or inheritance in proceedings in which all the parties profess the Muslim religion"(para 3)
July 19, 2016, 3:56 p.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Marriage in Trinidad and Tobago is governed by the following legislation: The Marriage Act 1923; The Muslim Marriage and Divorce Act 1961; The Hindu Marriage Act 1945; and The Orisa Marriage Act, 1999. These Acts all require free and full consent to marriage and only make a distinction between the sexes, on the basis of age. In accordance with the Muslim, Hindu and Orisa Marriage Acts, persons below 18 years of age, as all others, may enter into marriage only after having given their full consent. Furthermore in cases of marriages involving minors as allowed by the above mentioned legislation, the Marriage Act also necessitates the consent of the parents ...more
June 20, 2016, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Other countries only permit marriage among the young for certain groups. For instance, according to the US state department's humans right report on Trindad & Tobago from 2014, though the official marital age is 18 for men and women, Muslims and Hindus have a separate Marriage Act. Muslims are permitted to get married at 16 for men and 12 for girls and Hindus at 18 and 14. The ages for Muslim marriage are shown in the table" (6-7).
June 13, 2016, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"To 'keep the peace,' all matters of personal status, including marriage, divorce and inheritance, are subject to religious rather than civil law...As a result of this pervasive system of political and social sectarianism, civil marriage was historically banned, forcing those desirous of it to wed in neighboring countries and then register their 'foreign' marriages in Lebanon" (Para 7, 8). "In Lebanon, a citizen must be associated with one of the officially recognized sects in order to marry, divorce, negotiate child custody and inheritance or vote. A landmark decree issued in 2007, however, allows Lebanese citizens to strike their religion from the state record, severing the "administrative" link to their sect ...more
June 13, 2016, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"For the overwhelmingly Lebanese wedding party, however, there was nothing unusual about this ceremony. Samer and Eva (not their real names) were marrying civilly, which until recently was considered illegal in Lebanon. Many of the guests had previously attended weddings like this one in neighboring countries such as Cyprus and Turkey, which allow civil marriages for those who come from countries that prohibit all but religious ceremonies. And all were familiar with the stigma associated with interfaith marriages in their sectarian state, where unions between people of different religions are legally possible but socially frowned upon, making the absence of the Christian bride’s family at her wedding to a Muslim ...more
May 15, 2016, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Religious rules and custom law are not a source of our family law. The criteria applied for the purpose of legal typology of families are the grounds for establishment and the scope of relatives included. According to the grounds for establishment, there are three types of families: the ones stemming from matrimony, the ones not stemming from matrimony and adoptive ones. A family stemming from matrimony is established by children being born in marriage, as legally regulated union of man and woman. Such a family is composed of the spouses and their offspring. A family not stemming from matrimony represents a factual union between man and woman in which children ...more
May 11, 2016, 11:08 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Hossain’s work has also brought some important breakthroughs in personal family law for Hindus, Muslims and Christians. Codified during colonial rule, these laws often leave women in dire poverty in the event of divorce or separation. About 80% of Blast’s cases deal with family law" (18).
March 31, 2016, 10:42 p.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"In a 335-page decision released on Wednesday, Chief Justice Robert Bauman ruled in favour of the section of the Criminal Code outlawing polygamous unions. In his ruling, Bauman said while the law does infringe on religious freedom, it is justified given the harm polygamy causes to children, women and society"(para 2-3)
March 31, 2016, 6:18 p.m.
Countries: United Kingdom
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Currently, marriages and divorces carried out by sharia courts are not legally valid in this country unless another ceremony is conducted under British legislation. Critics complain, however, that rulings are accepted and enforced with some Muslim communities, meaning that the courts have greater power than their legal status suggests" (para 6-7)
March 14, 2016, 7:56 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Zhumalieva and her co-author, Aida Salyanova (from the Ata-Meken Party), propose that “The mullah who performs the nikah ceremony must be held accountable.” According to their draft bill, that means the mullah must first have proof the couple -- any couple regardless of age -- coming to him have already “registered their marriage at a state agency.” If not, the mullah faces three to five years in jail." (8)
March 11, 2016, 6:42 p.m.
Countries: Brunei
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Registration of Marriages Act (Cap. 124) governs the registration of marriages solemnized or contracted both within and outside Brunei Darussalam. For the registration of marriages contracted according to established Chinese law or custom, consent of both parties to the registration of such marriage is required as provided for under the Chinese Marriages Act (Cap. 126). For the purpose of registration of marriage of a non-Muslim below the age of 18 years, the Registration of Marriages Act (Cap. 124) provides that before a marriage solemnized within Brunei and one of the parties neither professed the religion of Islam or Christian can be registered, the parents or one of the parents or ...more
Feb. 26, 2016, 10:59 a.m.
Countries: Guinea
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Religious marriages not recognized by the State are commonplace" (15)
Jan. 14, 2016, 2:29 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Sunni’s and Shia’s each have their own Sharia courts that deal with marital conflicts and other personal law issues...In May 2009, Bahrain approved a family law code for the first time (Law No. 19) which applies only to its Sunni citizens...The Family Law organizes the marriage relationship and all matters arising in connection with marriage, such as engagement, dowry, maintenance, parentage, separation, and custody. However, it is uncodified and governed by all-male religious Sharia courts...Women have long been subjected to severe forms of discrimination in Shari‘a courts by judges who issued rulings based on their personal explanation of Islamic texts instead of codified law" (5).
Jan. 11, 2016, 12:02 p.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The Committee is also concerned about the increase in polygamous marriages, the lack of registration of customary marriages and the diverging levels of protection against discrimination afforded to women as a result of the many regulations applying to marriage and family relations depending on one’s personal status. The Committee is further concerned that the National House of Chiefs has yet to take action to codify customary laws and eliminate customs and usages that are “outmoded and socially harmful” as mandated by article 272 (b) and (c) of the Constitution" (12)