The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for MARR-PRACTICE-6

May 28, 2019, 5:40 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"No citizen may marry a foreigner without permission from the Ministry of Interior, the NSB, and, in some instances, the PSO, under a regulation authorities enforced arbitrarily...The ministry typically approved marriages to foreigners if the foreigner provided an embassy letter stating that the government of the non-Yemeni spouse had no objection to the marriage and presented a marriage contract signed by a judge. Frequently, bribes facilitated approval; there was no available information on current practice" (13-14).
April 30, 2019, 5:44 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Since September 2017, Tunisian women are free to marry non-Muslims. President Beji Caid Essebsi repealed a circular dated to 1973, inspired by the country's Muslim traditions that previously required non-Muslim men to convert to Islam in order to marry a Muslim woman. Only then the country's Mufti would allow the marriage to take place." (para 2). "Despite the change in legislation, the fight over inter-religious marriages is not over yet as many women have recently stumbled on problems when trying to marry outside of Islam." (para 3). ""The whole problem was that we couldn't find in Hammamet a notary who was willing to marry us," Zeineb said recalling the first...more
April 10, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"The country lacks a civil marriage law. In order to be considered legal, civil marriages, marriages of some non-Orthodox Jews, marriages in non-Orthodox ceremonies, same-sex marriages, marriages of a Jew to a non-Jew, or marriages of a Muslim woman to a non-Muslim must take place outside the country to be considered legal, because religious courts refuse to conduct these marriages" (17). "The majority of Jewish citizens objected to exclusive Orthodox control over aspects of their personal lives, including marriage and 'kashrut' (Jewish dietary laws), according to a survey of 800 Jewish Israelis published in September by the NGO Hiddush" (17).
April 4, 2019, 3:14 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"The Ministry of Interior requires citizens to obtain permission to marry foreigners, except nationals of Gulf Cooperation Council countries, whom citizens may marry without restriction; authorities do not automatically grant permission, which is particularly difficult for Omani women to obtain. Citizen marriage to a foreigner abroad without ministry approval may result in denial of entry for the foreignspouse at the border and preclude children from claiming citizenship and residency rights. It also may result in a bar from government employment and a fine of 2,000 rials ($5,200)" (5).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"According to common tradition, a woman’s first marriage requires parental consent" (page 19).
Feb. 26, 2019, 5:44 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Although Hosnia was a virgin, she was terrified that she might not bleed – a concern shared by many women in Afghanistan. In most cases, a bride who doesn’t bleed is 'returned' to her father by her husband, divorced immediately, or in some cases even killed. 'I’ve never talked about virginity with my fiancé before,' she says" (para. 18.)
Jan. 29, 2019, 2:53 p.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"The Committee notes the lack of progress in reforming the Personal Status Act and reiterates its concern about legal provisions that discriminate against women and girls in relation to marriage and family relations, including: The prohibition on Muslim women marrying non-Muslim men" (pg. 13).
Jan. 3, 2019, 1:50 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, MARR-PRACTICE-6

"[The President of Tunisia] has ended a decades-long ban on Tunisian Muslim women marrying non-Muslim men" (para 3). Nationality can be inferred to be muslim (CEM - CODER COMMENT).
Dec. 19, 2018, 12:08 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Tunisia has abolished a decades-old ban on Muslim women marrying non-Muslims as the president seeks to secure equal rights for the country's female population" (para 1). "'Congratulations to the women of Tunisia for the enshrinement of the right to the freedom to choose one's spouse,' presidency spokeswoman Saida Garrach wrote on Facebook on Thursday. The announcement came a month after President Beji Caid Essebsi called for the government to lift the ban dating back to 1973, arguing that existing practice violates Tunisia's constitution, adopted in 2014 in the wake of the Arab Spring revolution" (para 2, 3). "Until now a non-Muslim man who wished to marry a Muslim Tunisian woman...more
Nov. 16, 2018, 12:39 p.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Citizens seeking to marry noncitizens require government permission. Government workers are barred from receiving promotions in the case of marriage to a noncitizen. In case such a government worker is employed in the defense or international relations sector, automatic discharge is required" (5).
Nov. 16, 2018, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Women's Leadership: Kuki: Women in Kuki communities are prohibited from taking leadership positions in village/community affairs (For example, women are not allowed to be the leaders of village administrative body, cultural leaders, etc). In terms of religion, there are a lot more rules or restriction for women who want to become reverends. Although male reverends are allowed to get married, female reverends are not allowed to get married. If they do, they will be removed from their position. Source: Kuki Women’s Human Rights Organisation (KWHRO)" (page 32).
Nov. 3, 2018, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-LAW-5

"Separate religious court systems adjudicate matters such as marriage and divorce for the Jewish, Muslim, Christian, and Druze communities. Each year an estimated 20,000 civil marriages, marriages of some non-Orthodox Jews, marriages in non-Orthodox ceremonies, marriages of a Jew to a non-Jew, or marriages of a Muslim woman to a non-Muslim must take place outside the country to be considered legal, because religious courts refuse to accept these marriages, and the country lacks a civil marriage law" (para 58)
Oct. 25, 2018, 10:20 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"A 1998 Supreme Court directive prohibits legal officials from accepting petitions for marriages and from officiating at marriages between Burmese women and foreign men" (13).
Oct. 22, 2018, 9:31 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"There were many barriers to marriage between citizens and irregular migrants, whom authorities often required to obtain documentation from their embassy to register their marriage in the country, according to activist reporting" (para 118). "The government does not recognize marriages between Muslim women and non-Muslim men, irrespective of their citizenship" (para 155)
Oct. 19, 2018, 10:12 p.m.
Countries: Comoros
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"In Comoros, different forms of marriage coexist: religious marriage and customary marriage. But the first step of marriage is founded principally on the principles of Islam: the religious marriage, that is to say that it is the 'cadi' or his substitute, the 'Naibou' who celebrates marital unions. The marital status of a person is defined regarding religious marriage for Comorans and civil marriage for foreigners" (page 43).
Sept. 26, 2018, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Eritrea
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"The NCCE makes no reference to the validity of a religious or customary marriage celebrated outside of Eritrea. A considerable number of Eritreans live abroad. Those who are in neighboring countries, especially in Sudan, make use the service of an Orthodox Church to conclude a contract of marriage. Weddings at the Eritrean Orthodox Church in Khartoum are conducted regardless of citizenship, as long as the parties can sufficiently identify themselves; and as long as one of them satisfies as an Orthodox Christian and a member of the church... Similarly, Eritreans can also get married before an Ethiopian Orthodox church in Khartoum (14).
Sept. 6, 2018, 9:17 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"On the other hand, there are Hindu girls and women who decide to marry a Muslim and convert of their own free choice. Their angry parents will register an FIR and file a case of kidnapping against the groom and his family. Women in these circumstances place advertisements in local newspapers declaring they have converted and married of their own free will" (para 2). "In both cases, the rights of the girls and women get trampled on by families, by authorities and by criminals... in [this instance], a woman’s right to choose her religion and her marriage is endangered by her own family" (para 3)
Sept. 5, 2018, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Local interpretation of sharia prohibits Muslim women from marrying nonMuslims and Muslim men from marrying women 'not of the book,' generally meaning adherents of religions other than Islam, Christianity, and Judaism" (10).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Citizens must obtain government permission to marry foreigners, which was generally not granted for female citizens" (7).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"The law forbids marriage between Muslim women and non-Muslim men and requires male citizens serving in police or the military to obtain government approval to marry nonnationals. Nevertheless, the government offered only nonbinding advice on such matters and did not prevent any such marriages. According to an official, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs prohibited the country’s diplomats from marrying noncitizens without the diplomat being asked to resign" (8).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:16 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Married Bahais and their children faced difficulties obtaining national identification cards because the government did not recognize Bahai marriages as legitimate" (26-27). "For example, a female Muslim citizen cannot legally marry a non Muslim man. If she were to do so unofficially, she would face significant societal harassment" (40).
June 30, 2018, 12:24 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Marriage, one woman explains, is becoming freer and easier—“less stiff-necked”, as she puts it. All have far more choice when it comes to picking a marriage partner than their parents knew: two of the women have even married men from another religion" (Para 1).
April 7, 2018, 11:16 a.m.
Countries: Brunei
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, CLCC-LAW-1, MARR-PRACTICE-6

"The Committee notes with concern that a Bruneian woman who is married to a foreign national is required to submit an application under the Nationality Act in order to transmit her Bruneian citizenship to her children, while the children of a Bruneian father and a non-Bruneian mother automatically acquire such nationality. The Committee is also concerned that the foreign husband of a Bruneian woman and the foreign wife of a Bruneian man do not enjoy equal status when applying for permanent residence status" (Pg 7).
Feb. 28, 2018, 2:27 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"The Yazidi faith is theologically diverse, with strands of Islam, Christianity and Zoroastrianism. It is strictly closed, so a child must be born a Yazidi to worship as one, and adults must marry a Yazidi to build a family in the faith. Any sexual contact with a nonbeliever means banishment, a strict bar that treats rape no differently from a consensual relationship. The faith is thought to date back as early as 1200, though some argue its roots go even further back. Violence against Yazidis has been so frequent over the centuries that their word for attempted extermination – ferman – long predates the coining of its English equivalent, genocide"...more
Feb. 28, 2018, 2:26 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"The Yazidi faith is theologically diverse, with strands of Islam, Christianity and Zoroastrianism. It is strictly closed, so a child must be born a Yazidi to worship as one, and adults must marry a Yazidi to build a family in the faith. Any sexual contact with a nonbeliever means banishment, a strict bar that treats rape no differently from a consensual relationship. The faith is thought to date back as early as 1200, though some argue its roots go even further back. Violence against Yazidis has been so frequent over the centuries that their word for attempted extermination – ferman – long predates the coining of its English equivalent, genocide"...more
Jan. 6, 2018, 8:14 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-PRACTICE-7

"'Getting groped or touched by sexual harassers would happen on average once a month [in Cairo],' recalls Sara, the daughter of an Egyptian mother and a Moroccan father. Sara was born and raised in Kuwait"(1)
Jan. 6, 2018, 8:09 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-PRACTICE-7

"'Getting groped or touched by sexual harassers would happen on average once a month [in Cairo],' recalls Sara, the daughter of an Egyptian mother and a Moroccan father. Sara was born and raised in Kuwait. She moved to Egypt for a year"(1)
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-5, MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-PRACTICE-9

"'It costs a very huge amount of money for normal Chinese man to get married to a Chinese woman,' explained Ha Thi Van Khanh, national project coordinator for the U.N.'s anti-trafficking organization in Vietnam. Traditionally, Chinese men wishing to marry local women are expected to pay for an elaborate banquet and to have purchased a new home to live in after the wedding. 'This is why they try to import women from neighboring countries, including Vietnam'" (para 16).
Dec. 20, 2017, 2:37 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-LAW-5

"Based on Iran’s civil code, the marriage of an Iranian woman to a foreign national is dependent upon special permission from the Foreign Ministry. In practice, this means that Iranian women need to get permission to marry non-Iranian Muslims. Iran's civil code forbids Muslim women from marrying non-Muslim men. An estimated 70,000 marriages between Iranian women and Afghan men are not registered with the National Organization for Civil Registration. Meanwhile, Iran’s Interior Ministry has declared all marriages between Iranian women and Afghan men that took place after 2001 invalid" (para 2). "In contrast, Iranian men may marry Muslim or non-Muslim women and Iranian or non-Iranian women without obtaining permission from...more
Dec. 13, 2017, 10:21 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"“The jirga members… decided to punish the girl in a novel way so no one in future can dare to marry without consent of their parents and give a bad name to the village" (para 5). “Love marriage is quite frequent in our village and jirgas always helped in resolving disputes" (para 14).