The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for MARR-PRACTICE-7

Nov. 10, 2017, 1:02 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"The Worker’s Party of Korea (WPK) is the key governing body in the country; party membership is dictated by social and family background and is the key determinant of social mobility. The government divided citizens into strict loyalty-based classes known as 'songbun,' which determined access to employment, higher education, place of residence, medical facilities, certain stores, marriage prospects, and food rations"(6)
Nov. 7, 2017, 9:21 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Two months ago, she [Shaheen, a Village Education Resource Centre community coordinator] stopped by the home of a local widow, to find out if her 14-year-old daughter Jasmine, who had been forced to leave school as money was short, was interested in some training to become a garment factory worker.Many slum residents find work at Dhaka's garment factories, earning about $50 per month of 12-hour shifts, or spend their days recycling plastic wrapping in sheds within the slum.Jasmine's mother said the training wasn't necessary, as she planned to send her daughter back to their native village to marry.Shaheen contacted members of a women's group, who visited to urge Jasmine's mother ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Safaa (pseudonym), 27, had a 'fatiha' marriage (traditional marriage) at age 15 that was not officially registered. She lived with her husband in a village between the cities of Settat and Khouribga. They have a son who was 3 years old at the time of the interview.Safaa said that in 2014, her husband’s family told him to kick her out of the house as they wanted him to marry a relative. She said her husband and his two brothers proceeded to beat her and dragged her on the floor by her hair.Then her husband stabbed her in the side with a knife. 'If my sister wasn’t there they would have ...more
Oct. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Others remain constrained by Nubia's traditional mores and customs. Still others have gradually moved away from those traditions. Nevertheless, the bonds of marriage continue to stand, as families insist that Nubian women marry Nubian men in order to preserve the Nubian heritage throughout their lives, according to accounts given by Nubian girls to Al-Monitor"(para 1)."The area's geographic isolation and linguistic distinctiveness reinforces the importance of Nubian women marrying Nubian men. On the other hand, Nubian men are often free to marry whomever they desire. Some women believe in the importance of marrying a Nubian man in the conviction that they are the only ones capable of protecting them, while comparatively ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 9:30 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"For the first two days, Khan said, they hid at a cousin’s house, fearing retribution from Rafiq’s relatives. Then they went to Khan’s mother’s house.A few days later, Khan said, Rafiq’s mother and an uncle arrived with something of an olive branch: if you let Rafiq return home, they said, we’ll arrange a formal wedding reception"(para 17-18). The family of Khan's wife rejected his multiple marriage proposals (ENB-Coder Comment)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"When their husbands die many widows are left destitute. If they remain with their in-laws they may be confined to the house and treated like servants, activists say. In some cases the family may even blame the widow for her husband’s death"(para 15)."Often forced into virtual seclusion, they [widows] are not supposed to remarry or move out of their in-laws’ homes, which leaves many open to exploitation"(para 20)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Women and girls in Chechnya are subject to honour killings, domestic violence, abductions for marriage and early marriages"(para 4). Abductions could imply that women are taken to live with the husband's family (ENB-Coder Comment)."In Chechnya and Ingushetia many are deprived of their children after divorce – with reference to purported 'tradition' which allegedly prescribes children to be raised in their father’s family – and are often denied visiting rights. Some have been struggling to see their children for years"(para 4)
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Even though I had support from my husband and my in-laws, there was always someone reminding me that my marriage had no meaning without children"(para 4)."A young woman I know planned her wedding exactly during her ovulation cycle to make sure she gets pregnant shortly after her wedding. Sadly, four years have passed and she is still childless. Her husband does not love her the way he used to. Her in-laws are considerably unhappy with her and tend to be verbally and physically abusive"(para 7)."In many parts of Afghanistan, infertile women are abused in their homes, deprived of their inheritance, sent back to their parents, ostracized or have their marriage ...more
Sept. 26, 2017, 10:30 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"In India's caste system, the Dalits are traditionally regarded as the lowest of the low. Seen as 'unclean,' they are considered untouchable by the higher castes"(para 1)
Aug. 8, 2017, 3:35 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"In the evening, the girls will be brought to the grooms’ family homes, lifting their veils to reveal their faces to their new husbands"(para 5)."The 30 grooms in the recent ceremony work in low-wage jobs, some as drivers, others as security guards or agricultural labourers.The brides are mainly unemployed and after their marriages most of the couples will live with families as they cannot afford their own homes"(para 12-13)
Aug. 5, 2017, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"The bride, who moves in with her husband’s family, may face ill-treatment and abuse in her new household, particularly if she is very young" (9)
Aug. 3, 2017, 4:31 a.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"After marriage many women or girls moved into the husband's home, where they occupied the lowest rung on the family social ladder" (para 195)
April 25, 2017, 5:22 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"A widowed writer in her 40s, who uses the pen name Mayumi Sugihara, made the difficult decision to end ties with her husband’s parents 1½ years after her spouse’s death. Sugihara and her husband, who was more than 10 years her senior, had been married for 17 years and lived with his parents, a situation Sugihara was never happy about. When her chronically ill husband died, a conflict developed between Sugihara and her in-laws over the funeral arrangements and inheritance issues. Eventually, the situation deteriorated to the point that she was forced out of her home" (3-4).
March 10, 2017, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"And as Chechen weddings are traditionally paid for by the groom and attended by his family members only, once ready the bride must wait to be collected. Pictures show her becoming tearful as she waits to be picked up from her parents house by her new in-laws who bring her to the ceremony" (para 6-7). While the location of the home of the new bride and groom is not mentioned, these wedding practices reflect the same cultural ideas as patrilocality (TP - CODER COMMENT).
Feb. 2, 2017, 1:48 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"A delegation had come from Geeta’s home village, and it included her mother, Anguri. Geeta remembered her tenderly massaging her legs before sending her away to be married. She thought she was around 10. She had seen her on rare occasions since then" (para 75).
Feb. 1, 2017, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"The village had its own plan for these young women. Upon reaching adulthood, they would be transferred to the guardianship of another family, along with a huge dowry that serves as an incentive to treat them well. The transfer is final. Once married, the new bride cannot return to visit her parents without permission, which is given sparingly, so that the bonds to her old home will weaken. She must show her submission to the new family: She is not allowed to speak the names of her in-laws, because it is seen as too familiar, and in some places she is not allowed to use words that begin with the ...more
Feb. 1, 2017, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Girls are seen as a burden for their families, in part because convention dictates that girls go to live with and contribute to their husband’s family, while boys stay with and support parents through their old age" (para 8).
Jan. 27, 2017, 1:11 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Many argue that girls are going to get married and go to their husband’s house so education is of no use to them" (para 3).
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:08 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"In Bangladesh, women are still restricted within their home from the birth with the perception that they will go away to other home after their marriage" (9).
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:32 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"In Tajikistan, a bride traditionally moves to her in-laws home and joins a large extended family. This means she has little protection from her own relatives and is vulnerable to systematic bullying and abuse. Domestic violence is common" (para 6).
Nov. 16, 2016, 1:51 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"In a traditional patriarchal society, where the identity and value of a woman is determined through her husband, widowhood is about much more than losing a husband. In India, from changing how she dresses to being treated with contempt by family members, especially by her in-laws, there is a lot that a widow must bear, often without complaining. The trauma doesn’t end there. The widow becomes a social pariah who is barred from participating in family events and is often denied property rights"(para 2). "The mother of a 3-year-old boy, Jyoti shunned these 'old-fashioned' beliefs. 'I come from a financially backward family and was compelled to give up my education ...more
Nov. 14, 2016, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Benefsheh sits on a couch, shy and dressed in school uniform, as she recounts her divorce. At the age of seven, her parents married her off to a 16-year-old boy in exchange for a wife for her brother. Benefsheh was abused by her husband and mother-in-law, who would beat her and force her to do hard manual labour in the mountains. When her brother eventually decided to rescue her from her in-laws, her husband claimed compensation: her younger sister, Shogofa"(para 1-3)."When her brother eloped with a cousin to marry for love, community elders decided that Fereshteh should be given as reimbursement to alleviate his family’s shame. She married her 27-year-old ...more
Nov. 9, 2016, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"'For instance, female and male children will face different challenges in societies in which females’ families receive dowry when their daughter marries while males are expected to inherit land and other resources when they come of age'"(para 21)
Oct. 7, 2016, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Fiji
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-PRACTICE-7

"There are honour beatings, we could term honour beatings when people, when young [Indo-Fijian] women don't adhere to what their parents want, what the community they belong to want and so on, particularly in terms of falling in love with someone outside of that community or someone undesirable perceived by the parents. So often girls are brought back and beaten quite badly, sometimes locked up and forced to marry other people. So that has occurred and continues to occur in Fiji" (para 5).
Sept. 27, 2016, 4:55 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

“Experiments like the one in Bangalore [employing girls in factories] run against deep currents in India … They also collide spectacularly with an old way of life, in which girls are kept in seclusion until they can be transferred to another family through arranged marriage” (para 6). “The village had its own plan for these young women. Upon reaching adulthood, they would be transferred to the guardianship of another family, along with a huge dowry that serves as an incentive to treat them well. The transfer is final. Once married, the new bride cannot return to visit her parents without permission, which is given sparingly, so that the bonds to ...more
Sept. 13, 2016, 5:02 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

“One academy cleric, Mohammad Saeed Noori, said it was possible that men were not performing the triple talaq correctly. ‘Don't give three altogether in one go. People who do that are doing it wrong,’ Noori said. But ‘if he says it thrice, then the divorce is immediately confirmed. Then that woman has to immediately leave his house’” (para 22-23). If a woman has to leave her husband’s house upon divorce, it indicates that the marriage was patrilocal (MM - CODER COMMENT)
Sept. 6, 2016, 1:39 p.m.
Countries: Armenia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Zaruhi [Petrosyan], an orphan and mother of one daughter, lived with her husband and his family in the town of Masis in the Armavir region. She was incessantly abused by her husband and mother-inlaw"(20)
Aug. 31, 2016, 12:03 p.m.
Countries: Nicaragua
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Article 151. . . . The husband is the representative of the family . . .Article 152. The husband is required to live with his wife and she is to live with her husband and follow him to wherever he changes his residence" (para 1-2)
Aug. 30, 2016, 10:54 a.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Article 319. The husband is the head of the household . . . The choice of the family residence belongs to the husband. The wife is obliged to live with him and he shall accommodate her . . ." (para 3)
May 7, 2016, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7, MARR-PRACTICE-8

"The population of Montenegro has been influenced and shaped by some particular traditional customs through the history. This population had been divided in clans and practiced complementary endogamy. This term defines some kind of marital consensus in which men from one clan would take the bride from another particular clan and vice versa" (847)