The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for MARR-PRACTICE-8

Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Aisha was married to her cousin when she was just 15 years old" (para 1). "My aunt came to our house one day to ask for my sister’s hand in marriage for her son" (para 15).
Aug. 3, 2017, 3:26 p.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"21.06 As recorded by the website of the US State Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, accessed on 15 February 2008, 'Vietnamese law does not recognize common-law marriages. Authorities do issue certificates verifying cohabitation but these do not constitute legal marriages. Vietnamese law prohibits marriage between blood siblings, half siblings, first cousins or any two persons related closer than three degrees of separation. The legal age for marriage is 20 for men, 18 for women... Divorce records are maintained by the courts where they were issued'” (42)
Nov. 17, 2016, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"In recent years, considerable attention has been devoted to preventing early, child marriages. On 16 December 2011, the Committee on Labour and Social Issues of the Legislative Chamber of the Oliy Majlis of the Republic of Uzbekistan conducted a round table on the topic 'The Prevention of Early, Child Marriages and Consanguineous Marriages ― Guarantee of a Healthy Lifestyle', which generated recommendations aimed at strengthening awareness-raising regarding the protection of the reproductive health of women among persons getting married and youth, as well as information campaigns addressing prevention of early, child marriages and clarification of provisions of the Family Code and other legislative acts involving liability for violation of the ...more
Nov. 17, 2016, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"A total of 8,891 'Parents’ University' classes were created in the makhallyas for awareness-raising with parents to increase legal literacy with regard to the eradication of early, child, and consanguineous marriages. In 2013, the Makhallya Fund, together with the Women’s Committee, the Kamolot Public Youth Movement and law enforcement authorities in the makhallyas, conducted 13,000 events on the topics 'The Negative Effects of Early Marriages', 'The Role of Women in Society', 'Women and the Political Process' and 'Women, Society and Politics', which attracted more than 950,000 participants, among them women and youth. The makhallyas created more than 7,000 public groups for organizing cultural education, conducted more than 20,000 awareness-raising educational ...more
Nov. 14, 2016, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8, PW-PRACTICE-3

"When her brother eloped with a cousin to marry for love, community elders decided that Fereshteh should be given as reimbursement to alleviate his family’s shame. She married her 27-year-old cousin, who already had a wife and children"(para 11)
Aug. 23, 2016, 12:34 p.m.
Countries: East Timor
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Another type of arranged marriage is cross-cousin marriage, where a son will marry his maternal uncle’s daughter" (60).
May 10, 2016, 6:30 p.m.
Countries: India, Niger, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, United States
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

“Approximately 0.2% of all marriages are consanguineous in the United States but in India 26.6% marriages are consanguineous, in Saudi Arabia the figure is 38.4% and in Niger, Pakistan and Sudan a majority of marriages are consanguineous” (1)
May 10, 2016, 6:22 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

“Cousin marriage is also commonly practiced in Niger across ethnic groups although it is decreasing particularly in urban centers where there is more and more awareness about genetic health risks for children born of such unions” (921)
May 7, 2016, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7, MARR-PRACTICE-8

"The population of Montenegro has been influenced and shaped by some particular traditional customs through the history. This population had been divided in clans and practiced complementary endogamy. This term defines some kind of marital consensus in which men from one clan would take the bride from another particular clan and vice versa" (847)
May 7, 2016, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7, MARR-PRACTICE-8

"In traditional Pedi society, marriage was patrilocal, and polygyny was practised by those with a higher social status, including chiefs. Marriage to a cousin was preferred in the ruling dynasty, as this ensured a degree of political integration and control. This is because the two-sets of in-laws were already connected, and the bohadi (bridewealth) could then be used for further bohadi payments within the ruling house" (para 31)
May 6, 2016, 3:06 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Territorial endogamy was also the predominant pattern for traditional marriages among the other South Slavs. Matrimonial endogamy began to disappear by the 1920s. Even before, there were several regions characterized by strict exogamy (some villages in Eastern Serbia, several Monenegrin tribes, and others)" (51)
May 6, 2016, 3 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"A marriage cannot be entered into between blood relation in the first line, nor by a brother and a sister, brother and sister on the side of the mother or the father, between an uncle and a niece, an aunt and a nephew, nor between the children of sisters and brothers and sisters and brothers on the side of the father or the mother" (5)
May 6, 2016, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Mauritius
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Research on how cognitive and cultural biases shape marital decisions in Mauritius suggests that ethnic endogamy will remain the norm and maintain ethnic group boundaries. Results of a pile sorting exercise of Mauritian university students intimates that preferences for ethnic endogamy are paramount and override class-based considerations. Thus, despite socio-economic stratification within each ethnic group, inter-ethnic marriage is not common. Results from in-depth interviews suggest that individuals and their parents prefer to marry within their ethnic group to ensure that their spouse will abide by ethnically-specific norms and conventions, increasing the chances of coordinating reciprocal exchanges within a marriage. The presence of some inter-ethnic marriage does not weaken the boundaries ...more
May 6, 2016, 2:42 p.m.
Countries: Macedonia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Blood relatives in the same line may not stipulate a marriage (grandfather, grandmother, mother, father and grandchildren), as well as biological brothers and sisters, brother and sister by father, i.e. by mother, uncle and his brother’s nephew, uncle and his sister’s child, aunt and her brother’s child, aunt and her sister’s child, nor first cousins" (3)
May 6, 2016, 2:25 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"I'm [Hloni Molete] Sotho by culture, and our tradition doesn't frown much on cousins being intimate" (para 10)
May 6, 2016, 2:19 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"As a general rule of Sesotho customary law, a person can be married to any person of his or her choice. Following this formulation, cousins (batsoala) may enter into a legally binding marital relationship. The word 'cousin' in the context of Sesotho customary law is restricted to any child of a brother's sister and vice versa" (78)
April 28, 2016, 4:37 p.m.
Countries: Haiti
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Incest restrictions extend to first cousins" (para 43)
April 28, 2016, 4:35 p.m.
Countries: Guinea-Bissau
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"The Susa believe that polygamy is acceptable. Most marriages are made for the advantage of the family. Girls will be betrothed before or immediately after birth. Boys are often encouraged to marry one of his cousins from his mother’s family" (25). The Susa are a small ethnic group (HJ-Coder Comment)
April 28, 2016, 4:29 p.m.
Countries: Guinea-Bissau
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"They prefer to marry cousins" (para 8). The Jola-Fonyi make up a very small population of the country (HJ-Coder Comment)
April 28, 2016, 4:26 p.m.
Countries: Guinea-Bissau
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"I know cousins marrying cousins is a reality here. Even in the states I grew up with my dad telling me I was going to marry my cousin" (para 3). This piece of information comes from a woman that moved to Guinea-Bissau from the US. Her parents are from Guinea-Bissau. She mentions how her dad always talked about her marrying her cousin even when they lived in the US (HJ-Coder Comment)
April 28, 2016, 4:21 p.m.
Countries: Gabon
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"The Gabonese generally marry within their ethnic groups but outside of their villages to avoid marrying relatives" (3)
April 28, 2016, 4:16 p.m.
Countries: Central African Rep
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Banguiois are also more likely to marry outside their ethnic groups because the entire spectrum is present in the city. There is a sentiment quite pronounced among Muslims that it is better for a man to marry a woman from the village of his ancestors than a woman from Bangui" (121)
April 28, 2016, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"The Swazi are the only group among the Nguni to permit cousin marriage, and then only with cross-cousins (father's sister's child, or mother's brother's child)" (20)
April 26, 2016, 2:16 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

“Consanguineous unions are common; overall, 31 percent of ever-married women report their current or most recent husband was a blood relative” (89). “Marriages between blood relatives (consanguineous marriages) are common in Egypt” (91). “31 percent of ever-married women report that their current or, in the case of widowed or divorced women, their most recent husband was a blood relative. More than half of consanguineous marriages involve first cousins. In consanguineous marriages, the husband is more likely to be a relative from the father’s side than the mother’s side” (91). “As expected, consanguineous marriages are more common in rural than in urban areas; more than one-third of the marriages in rural ...more
April 20, 2016, 9:38 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"In Uganda it is an abomination to marry a cousin.. it does not happen here culturally it is taboo.. i have heard that it may happen among the bahima tribe in western uganda"
April 15, 2016, 3:25 p.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Traditionally, parents and adult relatives often arranged marriages. One of the reasons for this was to ensure not individual but social/ communal compatibility. Love was developed not outside of marriage but within marriage. Marriage outside of the clan was often the norm but sometimes arrangements were made for marriage within the clan for exceptional reasons. Great care was taken that close relatives, ranging from first to third cousins, were not involved" (para 60)
April 15, 2016, 3:19 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

“This can initiate a regularly recurring sequence of cross-cousin marriages, allying the descendants of the chief and the descendants of the powerful stranger. The alliance serves a political function – of power sharing among the two leading families” (50)
April 15, 2016, 3:11 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"According to the Ancient Kono tradition, the ideal marriage partner is one's cross-cousin; hence, there are numerous cases of cross-cousin marriage, still being practiced among the Mandikas and other Mande speakers” (73)
April 15, 2016, 2:56 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

“Cross-cousin marriage is not practiced among many groups such as the Sherpa and Hindu caste groups. However, the Thakuri permit and prefer cross-cousin matrilateral marriage. Other groups such as the Tamang and Nyinba prefer bilateral cross-cousin marriage" (1)
April 15, 2016, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Moldova
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

“The incest taboo extends only to first cousins; marriages among second or third cousins are common, although usually performed following special authorization from the church” (1)