The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for MULV-DATA-1

Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"Many Chechen women remain family breadwinners and still have to do all the housework, but since the war their social status has dramatically changed for the worse"(para 14)
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, MULV-PRACTICE-1, MULV-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2

"Like many women, I always thought that after university and finding some financial stability, I would marry and have children. I guess the fact that I grew up in a progressive and supportive family made me forget that the experiences of Afghan women are unlike those of many women around the world. I forgot, for a second, that as a woman unless you can have children, your education, career, and marriage are considered meaningless. I was not prepared for feeling that in the eyes of my community, my only worth as a woman is to bear children in the end"(para 2)."Conceiving soon after marriage is highly glorified in Afghan society. ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:04 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"TBILISI, Georgia – The camera zooms in, panning across a marble mantle covered with family photos of three young boys and their happy, smiling parents, then stops on what studies have shown is a statistically uncommon sight in Georgia: A father – in this case Zviad Kvaratskhelia, best-selling author and publisher – sitting in his living room, spending the day alone with his kids – Nikoloz, age 5, Demetre, 3, and Alexandre, 1"(para 1)."'I had never spent time alone with my kids before. They found it bizarre at first to see me changing diapers and cooking for them,' says Zviad. 'But we mustn’t take our families for granted. We must ...more
Aug. 7, 2017, 4:16 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

¨However, in the case of Japan, where mothers and fathers may take combined leave of up to fourteen months, some mothers feel the ´mommy track´ is too slow¨(para 2)."Perhaps not surprisingly then, 68 percent of mothers in Japan quit their jobs upon marriage or childbirth. Among the women that do remain economically active, the majority seek part-time or irregular employment"(para 5)."Barriers to women’s labor force participation in Japan include factors yet to be addressed by policy reforms such as the availability of affordable, quality childcare and tax codes that favor men"(para 8)
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3, ERBG-DATA-4, MULV-DATA-1

Figure 3.3 shows women’s share of part-time workers by main reason for part-time work in 2013. For those who work part-time because they are retired or have a social security limit on earnings, women make up 49.2%. For those who work part-time for slack work or business conditions, women make up 51.4%. For those who work part-time because they are in school or training, women make up 56.5%. For those who could only find part-time work, women make up 59%. For those who turn to part-time work because they have other family or personal obligations, women make up 90.1% of them. And for people who have child care problems and ...more
Feb. 1, 2017, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"In 2012, the last time the government surveyed its citizens about their occupation, an astonishing 205 million women between the ages of 15 and 60 responded 'attending to domestic duties'” (para 4).
Jan. 4, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3, MULV-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-1

“Union officials reported that sectors employing predominantly women, such as secretarial work, offered wages below the official minimum wage of 190 JD ($266) per month. Many women said traditional social pressures discouraged them from pursuing professional careers, especially after marriage” (45).
Nov. 17, 2016, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"The larger role of women in the family, in rearing children, and in contribution to the family budget was noted by more than 50 per cent of the respondents" (24)
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:08 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“Most of the women who worked in the past year:  Did nonagricultural work (83%)  Worked year-round (61%)  Were employed by a nonfamily member (61%)  Were paid entirely in cash (83%)” (34). “Women are more likely to work if they are divorced, separated, or widowed than if they are married, but the reverse is true for men. Never-married women and men are least likely to be employed (Table 3.5.1 and Table 3.5.2)” (34). “About half of currently married women are employed compared with 83% of currently married men. One-third of currently married women who receive cash earnings report deciding for themselves how earnings will be used; 62% ...more
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“At the time of the survey, 33 percent of ever-married women age 15-49 were currently employed. Three percent were not working, although they had worked in the 12 months prior to the survey, while the remaining 64 percent said that they had not been employed in the previous 12 months” (34). “The level of employment increases with the number of children. Women who have five or more children are more likely to be employed (37 percent) compared with women with no children (23 percent)” (34). “Overall, 8 in 10 women who were employed work for cash only, and 6 percent receive cash and in-kind payment. There are significant variations in ...more
Sept. 27, 2016, 4:55 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2, MULV-DATA-1

“In 2012, the last time the government surveyed its citizens about their occupation, an astonishing 205 million women between the ages of 15 and 60 responded ‘attending to domestic duties'” (para 4).
Sept. 14, 2016, 4:05 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“Nine in 10 women receive cash (including cash and in-kind) for their work” (31). “Women in the oldest age groups (21 percent); women who are divorced, separated, or widowed (26 percent); women with five or more children (20 percent); rural women (22 percent); and women with a primary education (29 percent) are more likely to work in the agricultural sector” (47). “Table 3.7.1 shows that 9 in 10 women are paid for their work, with 8 in 10 receiving cash only and 10 percent receiving payment in cash and in-kind. Women who work in agriculture are much less likely than women engaged in nonagricultural work to be paid in cash ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“The proportion currently employed is considerably lower among younger respondents, especially those age 15-19, probably because many are still in school. Single women and men are also less likely to be working than those who are married or formerly married. For example, 38 percent of women who have never married were employed, compared with 54 percent of women who are married or living together” (33). “Four in five women employed in agricultural work are not paid for their work, while 83 percent of women employed in non-agricultural work are given their earnings as cash only” (39). “Women age 15-49 are employed in two major areas: namely agricultural work and nonagricultural ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:44 p.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“Overall, 26 percent of employed women in the agricultural sector are not paid at all, mainly because they are employed by a family member. On the other hand, 14 percent of women who are employed in the nonagricultural sector are not paid for their work” (31). “Never-married women are less likely to be currently employed (50 percent) compared with currently or previously married women (85 percent and 88 percent, respectively). Current employment increases with the number of living children from 51 percent of women with no children to 89 percent among those with five or more children” (42). “Similar to women, never-married men (64 percent) and those with no living ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 1:57 p.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“Overall, 26 percent of employed women in the agricultural sector are not paid at all, mainly because they are employed by a family member. On the other hand, 14 percent of women who are employed in the nonagricultural sector are not paid for their work” (31). “Never-married women are less likely to be currently employed (50 percent) compared with currently or previously married women (85 percent and 88 percent, respectively). Current employment increases with the number of living children from 51 percent of women with no children to 89 percent among those with five or more children” (42). “Similar to women, never-married men (64 percent) and those with no living ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:53 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“The proportion currently employed is considerably lower among younger respondents, especially those age 15-19, probably because many are still in school. Single women and men are also less likely to be working than those who are married or formerly married. For example, 38 percent of women who have never married were employed, compared with 54 percent of women who are married or living together” (33). “Four in five women employed in agricultural work are not paid for their work, while 83 percent of women employed in non-agricultural work are given their earnings as cash only” (39). “Women age 15-49 are employed in two major areas: namely agricultural work and nonagricultural ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:52 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“The proportion currently employed is considerably lower among younger respondents, especially those age 15-19, probably because many are still in school. Single women and men are also less likely to be working than those who are married or formerly married. For example, 38 percent of women who have never married were employed, compared with 54 percent of women who are married or living together” (33). “Four in five women employed in agricultural work are not paid for their work, while 83 percent of women employed in non-agricultural work are given their earnings as cash only” (39). “Women age 15-49 are employed in two major areas: namely agricultural work and nonagricultural ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:50 a.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“Almost two in every three women (66 percent) are paid cash only for their work. This is mostly in nonagricultural work (83 percent, compared with 29 percent for agricultural work). Forty-three percent of those who work in agriculture are not paid, while 9 percent are paid in-kind” (53). “The majority of those employed were earning cash only (women, 61 percent; men, 82 percent); 15 percent of women and 10 percent of men had cash and in-kind earnings, and 4 percent of women and 1 percent of men had in-kind earnings only. A higher proportion of women (20 percent) than men (7 percent) were not paid for their work” (274). “Only ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:49 a.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“Overall, 26 percent of employed women in the agricultural sector are not paid at all, mainly because they are employed by a family member. On the other hand, 14 percent of women who are employed in the nonagricultural sector are not paid for their work” (31). “Never-married women are less likely to be currently employed (50 percent) compared with currently or previously married women (85 percent and 88 percent, respectively). Current employment increases with the number of living children from 51 percent of women with no children to 89 percent among those with five or more children” (42). “Similar to women, never-married men (64 percent) and those with no living ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:45 a.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“One out of ten employed women aged 15-49 receive no pay for their work” (19). “Half of the women who are married or living with a man are currently employed (51 percent). Ten percent were not working although they had been employed in 12 months prior to survey, while the remaining 39 percent said that they had not employed in the previous 12 months” (26). “Women who were divorced/separated or widowed are more likely to be employed than currently married women. The more children women have, the more likely they are to be currently employed” (26). “Overall, 84 percent of women receive their earnings in cash only, while 6 percent ...more
July 27, 2016, 10:06 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3, MULV-DATA-1

“At the time of the survey, 13 percent of ever-married women age 15-49 were currently employed. Two percent were not working although they had been employed in the 12 months prior to the survey, while the remaining 85 percent said that they had not been employed in the previous 12 months (Table 3.5.1)” (39). “Women who are divorced, separated, or widowed are much more likely to be employed than currently married women. Women who have 0-2 children are around twice as likely as those with five or more children to be employed” (39).
July 27, 2016, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3, MULV-DATA-1

“Women and men who have never married are less likely to be currently employed (42 percent and 55 percent, respectively) compared with other women and men. Women and men with no children are less likely to be currently employed than those who have children” (42). “Eighty-five percent of currently married women are employed, but more than half (54 percent) are not paid for their work. In comparison, 98 percent of married men are employed and 36 percent are unpaid” (247). “Eighty-five percent of currently married women are employed compared with 98 percent of married men. For both women and men, the percentage employed in the past 12 months increases with ...more
July 20, 2016, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"For example, in Mexico, 46 per cent of women aged 25–34 in households with very young children were in the labour force in 2010 compared to 55 per cent of women in households without children. The figures for men were 99 and 96 per cent, respectively" (84).
July 19, 2016, 3:56 p.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"The Counting of Unremunerated Work Act, 1996 (requires the Central Statistical Office and other public bodies to produce and maintain statistics relative to the counting of unremunerated work and to provide a mechanism for quantifying and recording the monetary value of such work.)" (11) "In 1996, Trinidad and Tobago was one of the first countries to enact a Counting Unremunerated Work Act, 1996, which required the Central Statistical Office (CSO) to conduct surveys of all unremunerated work, including housework and childcare. Information was collected on the hours spent doing housework and other related activities within the 2000 National Census. The data supports the notion that the time spent engaging in ...more
July 18, 2016, 9:54 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"In the United States, for example, the total value of unpaid childcare services in 2012 was estimated to be $3.2 trillion, or approximately 20 per cent of the total value of GDP (valued at $16.2 trillion that year)" (200).
July 18, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"Analysis for Mexico, shown in Figure 4.3, estimates the value of unpaid care and domestic work at 21 per cent of GDP, higher than manufacturing, commerce, real estate, mining, construction and transportation and storage" (200).
July 18, 2016, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"Analysis for Mexico, shown in Figure 4.3, estimates the value of unpaid care and domestic work at 21 per cent of GDP, higher than manufacturing, commerce, real estate, mining, construction and transportation and storage" (200).
May 15, 2016, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"The particularly difficult position of rural women implies that, in addition to regular household chores, they also cultivate the land, take goods to the market and thus fully contribute to the household budget. With such workload, a woman has little time to participate in development and design of economic and cultural policies. The funds that the state allocates for agricultural credits and other purposes are equally available to men and women, since they are granted according to the submitted business plans. There are specific areas for selling agricultural products and other goods in all towns; 90% is sold by women who produced the goods on display or women earning a ...more
April 30, 2016, 2:05 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“Most women work in agriculture, trade, or the service industries, with the employment status being mostly an unpaid family worker and regular employee (BPS, 2008)” (2). “Table 3.5.1 and Figure 3.1 show that 57 percent of ever-married women are currently employed, 3 percent are not currently employed but were employed at some time during the past 12 months, and 39 percent of women were not employed at all in the past 12 months” (28). “Table 3.5.2 shows that almost all currently married men are currently employed (98 percent), another 1 percent were employed at some time in the past year, and 1 percent were not employed at all during the ...more
April 27, 2016, 7:31 p.m.
Countries: Zambia
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

“Women who are divorced, separated, or widowed are most likely to be currently employed (69 percent), while women who have never been married are least likely to be employed (26 percent). The proportion of women who are currently employed increases steadily with number of living children, from 23 percent among those with no children to 65 percent among those with five or more children” (41). “More than six in ten women employed in agriculture (61 percent) are not paid for their work. By contrast, 85 percent of women who work in the nonagricultural sector are paid in cash, as compared with only 29 percent of women working in agriculture. Overall, ...more