The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for MULV-PRACTICE-1

Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Chechnya’s 38-year-old dictator Ramzan Kadyrov declared that his regime was going to restore traditional values and mores, and today exerts immense pressure on women. He has described women as a husband’s property, whose main role is to bear children"(para 15)
Oct. 11, 2017, 1:30 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Even as China relaxes its one-child policy, the traditional preference for boys still means many will not be satisfied without a son"(para 1)."Staff at the Yongjia county family planning department found that several married women in the area decided to get an abortion after being pregnant for less than two months, even though they had not violated any family planning regulations. It seems to have become a trend.Yongjia county police collected more than 100 fetus sex test results sent to local women and found that most of the tests were done by two Hong Kong-based companies, DiagCor Bioscience Incorporation Ltd and Hong Kong Laboratory"(para 9-10)
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, MULV-PRACTICE-1, MULV-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2

"Like many women, I always thought that after university and finding some financial stability, I would marry and have children. I guess the fact that I grew up in a progressive and supportive family made me forget that the experiences of Afghan women are unlike those of many women around the world. I forgot, for a second, that as a woman unless you can have children, your education, career, and marriage are considered meaningless. I was not prepared for feeling that in the eyes of my community, my only worth as a woman is to bear children in the end"(para 2)."Conceiving soon after marriage is highly glorified in Afghan society. ...more
Sept. 19, 2017, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Venezuela
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"CARACAS, Venezuela — In crisis-hit Venezuela, where raising a family is an increasingly grueling and expensive task, a growing number of young women are choosing to be sterilized.With inflation spiraling out of control, food and medicine supplies dwindling and violent crimes on the rise, women as young as 27 are seeking out surgeons to avoid unwanted pregnancies. A study by PLAFAM, the biggest family planning clinic in the country, estimates that about 23 percent more Venezuelan women are being sterilized today as compared to four years ago, said the clinic’s director, Enrique Abache. 'The financial crisis is one of the main causes for this,' he explained"(para 1-3)."'It wasn’t a hard ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:04 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"TBILISI, Georgia – The camera zooms in, panning across a marble mantle covered with family photos of three young boys and their happy, smiling parents, then stops on what studies have shown is a statistically uncommon sight in Georgia: A father – in this case Zviad Kvaratskhelia, best-selling author and publisher – sitting in his living room, spending the day alone with his kids – Nikoloz, age 5, Demetre, 3, and Alexandre, 1"(para 1)."'I had never spent time alone with my kids before. They found it bizarre at first to see me changing diapers and cooking for them,' says Zviad. 'But we mustn’t take our families for granted. We must ...more
Aug. 7, 2017, 4:16 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"According to one critic, for example, Japan’s 'gendered status quo' continues to 'allocate productive roles to men and reproductive roles to women.' Consequently, despite having one of the most liberal paid parental leave policies worldwide, only 2 percent of fathers take any of their leave, leaving the burden of childcare to fall on the mother. Perhaps not surprisingly then, 68 percent of mothers in Japan quit their jobs upon marriage or childbirth. Among the women that do remain economically active, the majority seek part-time or irregular employment"(para 5)
Jan. 6, 2017, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Economists say that's one reason the United States has been falling behind other countries in the quest for work-life balance. A growing body of research shows that mothers, far more than fathers, are forced to scale back at work or quit, even if they need the income” (para 17)
Jan. 6, 2017, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Economists don't know for sure. The culprit could be a combination of changing attitudes toward mothers at work in Japan and relatively limited support for mothers at work in the United States" (para 8)
Jan. 4, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3, MULV-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2

“Union officials reported that sectors employing predominantly women, such as secretarial work, offered wages below the official minimum wage of 190 JD ($266) per month. Many women said traditional social pressures discouraged them from pursuing professional careers, especially after marriage. According to the Jordanian National Commission for Women, half of the country’s university graduates were women, but women comprised only 13 percent of the labor force” (45).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:46 a.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

“Women who have never been married, have no children, and are living in rural areas are less likely than other women to be employed. Women who are divorced or separated are more likely to be employed than women who have never married or are currently married or living together (62 percent for divorced or separated women, 49 percent for women who are married or living together, and 28 percent for never married women)” (39). “More than half of women who have three or more living children are employed compared with 20 percent of women who have no living children. Women who reside in urban areas are much more likely to ...more
Aug. 21, 2016, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"All the more so because as much as a year before she was killed, the Taliban learned of her job, said Wali Khan, 21, her younger brother. 'She was doing the job secretly'' he said, telling only her immediate family and not wearing a uniform. 'Then a year ago one of our relatives who was in the Taliban found out and he told people.' That put her life at risk. Agnesa Shinwari, a member of the local provincial council, said, 'In Afghanistan, if your husband allows you to work or your father allows you, it doesn’t matter.' The woman is still not safe, she said, if another family member does ...more
Aug. 18, 2016, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"In it, she describes her daily life in Raqqa, the IS's de facto capital in Syria, and offers advice to wannabe IS wives about what to bring to Syria (she suggests bringing a book, such as Jane Austen's classic love story, 'Pride And Prejudice').'Download some good books or bring one or two good book. Please, no 'hardcore' topics. I personally downloaded few iBooks like Pride and Prejudice and some english novels beside books written by Ibn Qayyim [an Arab Sunni Islamic scholar] - and it helped a lot,' she advises in her blog.Bird of Jannah describes how IS provides housing, and basic necessities (stove, cooking utensils and monthly groceries) for ...more
May 15, 2016, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"The survey “Gender Barometer – the Quality of Life of Men and Women”12 revealed that men and women on average spend most of their time on formal employment, but man somewhat more than women since they are more often employed. On average, men spend very much time on socialising and recreation. Collectively, they spend more time on socialising and recreation than on formal employment. The only activity where women spend more time than men is performance of domestic duties on which women spend on average 3.6 hours per day. If all the activities that may be considered “work” are summed up then women work on average 8.2 hours per day ...more
April 26, 2016, 2:17 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1, BR-PRACTICE-2

“Voluntary childlessness is not common in Cambodia, and currently married women with no children are likely to be those who are unable to bear children (primary infertility)” (73). “Whereas 57 percent of currently married adolescent women are childless, this proportion decreases to 9 percent among currently married women age 25-29 and continues to decline with increasing age. The percentage of childless women among currently married women at the end of the reproductive period (age 45-49) shows that primary infertility among currently married women is low (2 percent)” (73).
April 25, 2016, 6:17 p.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"If men and women start performing identical unpaid work in the home, there is potential for both the social value and the market value of that work to increase. That child care worker who spent two years training to get her early childhood education degree might make enough to raise her family income above the poverty line. The skills required of a woman who has stayed out of paid work in order to raise three children (multitasking, strategic planning, conflict management) might also be valued at a level that allows her to re-enter the workforce as the experienced worker that she is" (24).
April 8, 2016, 2:29 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Jafar Sobhani, another Iranian mullah stated: 'Raise your daughters as house-masters. The main job of a woman is to strengthen the family union and your daughters should learn to do their job in the best way possible'" (2).
March 31, 2016, 1:32 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Girls as young as 14 or 15 are travelling mainly to Syria to marry jihadis, bear their children and join communities of fighters, with a small number taking up arms. Many are recruited via social media. Women and girls appear to make up about 10% of those leaving Europe, North America and Australia to link up with jihadi groups, including Islamic State (Isis). France has the highest number of female jihadi recruits, with 63 in the region – about 25% of the total – and at least another 60 believed to be considering the move. In most cases, women and girls appear to have left home to marry jihadis, drawn ...more
Jan. 7, 2016, 11:55 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Data shows a complex and puzzling picture: Women are becoming more educated but, simultaneously, the positive labor market effects typically associated with higher education are declining. It’s not that women don’t want to work. Our analysis of data from India’s latest labor survey shows that over a third of women engaged primarily in housework say they would like a job, with that number rising to close to half among the most educated women in rural India. Much of the reason they don’t work appears to lie in the persistence of India’s traditional gender norms, which seek to ensure 'purity' of women by protecting them from men other than their husbands ...more
Jan. 6, 2016, 1:04 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"The vast majority of women don’t work, and many leave home only with a male guardian at their side. Imagining women having an equal vote to men in the political affairs of their communities was, for many, a stretch. 'The most important thing is to convince women that it’s not enough just for you to sit home and complain,' said Muna Akeel, a Saudi journalist who has supported Baladi. 'It’s convincing them that you can do more — there is a way to get their voices heard.',” (15-16). “'We did get a lot of hassle in the beginning. A lot of the people have already accepted the idea that the ...more
Jan. 4, 2016, 10:25 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-1

"Even many highly educated women still frequently choose to stay home once they are married" (55).
Dec. 22, 2015, 10:12 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Data shows a complex and puzzling picture: Women are becoming more educated but, simultaneously, the positive labor market effects typically associated with higher education are declining. It’s not that women don’t want to work. Our analysis of data from India’s latest labor survey shows that over a third of women engaged primarily in housework say they would like a job, with that number rising to close to half among the most educated women in rural India. Much of the reason they don’t work appears to lie in the persistence of India’s traditional gender norms, which seek to ensure 'purity' of women by protecting them from men other than their husbands ...more
Dec. 4, 2015, 12:15 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

“A heterosexual female student said she would only marry a man ‘who didn’t just share equally in domestic chores and childcare when we’re home alone. My partner will act the same way when his parents come to visit,’ alluding to the pressure many men feel to perform patriarchal masculinity in front of other men; in India, especially their fathers” (2)
Aug. 19, 2015, 1:54 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"The State is committed to ensuring that the role of mothers continues to be honoured, together with the contribution of women to family care, and this in keeping with the sharia. Hence, the process of modifying female stereotypes must not be such as to downplay the role of women as wives and mothers" (39).
May 6, 2015, 1:54 p.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"In Bahamian society, the male is expected to provide for his family. However, with many households now being headed by females, this role is diminishing. Women are still perceived as caretakers of the family. However, the fact that more women are increasingly becoming heads of their households, is eroding away at this mindset. Nevertheless, there is still work to be done in this area to ensure full equality not only legally but in the mindset and attitude of Bahamians" (15)
May 2, 2015, 8:07 p.m.
Countries: Luxembourg
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"'Austerity has also undermined progress towards a more equal division of care responsibilities. Cuts in public care and health services have led to a re-privatisation of care work and a return to traditional gender roles. Austerity pushes the responsibility for, and cost of, social and public goods back onto households, and in effect, onto women' [John Hendra from UN Women]" (para 20-21)
May 2, 2015, 8:07 p.m.
Countries: Malta
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"'Austerity has also undermined progress towards a more equal division of care responsibilities. Cuts in public care and health services have led to a re-privatisation of care work and a return to traditional gender roles. Austerity pushes the responsibility for, and cost of, social and public goods back onto households, and in effect, onto women' [John Hendra from UN Women]" (para 20-21)
May 2, 2015, 8:06 p.m.
Countries: Czech Republic
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"'Austerity has also undermined progress towards a more equal division of care responsibilities. Cuts in public care and health services have led to a re-privatisation of care work and a return to traditional gender roles. Austerity pushes the responsibility for, and cost of, social and public goods back onto households, and in effect, onto women' [John Hendra from UN Women]" (para 20-21)
May 2, 2015, 8:06 p.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"'Austerity has also undermined progress towards a more equal division of care responsibilities. Cuts in public care and health services have led to a re-privatisation of care work and a return to traditional gender roles. Austerity pushes the responsibility for, and cost of, social and public goods back onto households, and in effect, onto women' [John Hendra from UN Women]" (para 20-21)
May 2, 2015, 8:05 p.m.
Countries: Poland
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"'Austerity has also undermined progress towards a more equal division of care responsibilities. Cuts in public care and health services have led to a re-privatisation of care work and a return to traditional gender roles. Austerity pushes the responsibility for, and cost of, social and public goods back onto households, and in effect, onto women' [John Hendra from UN Women]" (para 20-21)
May 2, 2015, 8:05 p.m.
Countries: France
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"'Austerity has also undermined progress towards a more equal division of care responsibilities. Cuts in public care and health services have led to a re-privatisation of care work and a return to traditional gender roles. Austerity pushes the responsibility for, and cost of, social and public goods back onto households, and in effect, onto women' [John Hendra from UN Women]" (para 20-21)