The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for SMPP-LAW-1

Aug. 11, 2017, 10:32 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

A volunteer community health worker named Ramudevi Malla tries to educate mothers on staying at their homes instead of a shed. According to this article it seems that post-partum seculsion is practiced because of tradition, not because of a law (ENB-Coder Comment)
July 17, 2017, 8:05 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

¨The (Happy to Bleed) movement resulted in the Sabarimala ban coming under legal scrutiny with the Indian Young Lawyers’ Association filing a petition in the Supreme Court. The petition seeks entry for all women which prompted the court to ask temple authorities to explain the ban (on women entering a shrine until a machine was invented to determine if they were ´pure´ or menstruating¨(para 5).¨Public pressure seems to be working. The Bombay high court on March 30 asked the state government of Maharashtra to ensure that women are not denied entry to any temple. Hearing a public interest litigation challenging the prohibition on women’s entry to the Shani Shingnapur temple, ...more
Jan. 30, 2017, 5:55 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2, SMPP-LAW-1, DV-LAW-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"In Pakistan there is currently a wife-beating bill proposed by the Council of Islamic Ideology, stating that a man should be able to 'lightly beat' his wife as a form of discipline.The draft details that a husband should be entitled to 'lightly' beat his wife if she does one of the following: defies his commands, does not dress up as per her husband's desires, refuses intercourse or does not take a bath after intercourse/ menstrual periods" (para 10).
Feb. 29, 2016, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

""Women are not limited by law, but extremely limited in the church. In many churches in Ukraine, protestant and orthodox, a woman cannot partake in communion, or attend church if she is menstruating. Also, she must wait 7-8 weeks after giving birth to attend as well. She is considered extremely unclean. While this does not affect other areas of their lives, they are oppressed in the Church because of it. I was severely oppressed due to my menstruation, and I could not attend church as a result, as well as my daughters. Also, a husband forcing his wife to have sex while menstruating is a big problem as well. They ...more
Jan. 27, 2016, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"The nonprofit is working with girls and women in western Nepal to end a tradition called chaupadi — that's held them back for thousands of years: 'When they are menstruating, no matter what, they stay outside, they eat outside and they sleep outside,' Shrestha says.Outside in sheds. In Kamala's village they consist of a raised platform, with no walls, some have thatched roofs...The Supreme Court of Nepal outlawed the practice in 2005 so it's illegal to force women into these sheds, but many villagers in the remote west continue to do it"(para 4-5, 33)
April 20, 2015, 8:09 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"Even though Nepal expeditiously signed and ratified the 1979 UN General Assembly Resolution on the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) on February 5, 1991, it took over a decade before the Nepalese Supreme Court in 2005 forced the Nepalese government to outlaw the separation between men and women during womens’ menstrual cycles" (para 3)
Nov. 23, 2014, 8:54 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"When Nepal became a secular state in 2006, the practice disappeared in most parts of the country. A ruling by the Supreme Court in effect bans the practice and imposes stiff sentences on anyone forcing women to follow it. However, the tradition survives in the poorest regions, especially the western districts of Accham, Doti, Baitadi, Dadeldhura and Dailekh" (Para 3)
Sept. 16, 2011, 1:13 p.m.
Countries: Colombia
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"No. There aren’t any laws that require that menstruating or post partum women enter into seclusion or limit their activities in any way by law."
June 7, 2011, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

“The centuries old practice of chhaupadi in Nepal can cause prolonged depression in girls and women. In extreme cases it can also cause death. Chhaupadi pratha, or ritual practice, places Nepali women and girls in a limbo of isolation. In history it is a practice that has been largely accepted. The word chhaupadi, translates in the Achham local Raute dialect as ‘chhau’ which means menstruation and ‘padi’ – woman. Today the ritual of banishment surrounding chhaupadi still affects girls and women on all levels of Nepali society. This dangerous practice also isolates woman during and after childbirth as they are banished for up to eleven days away from family members, ...more
Nov. 29, 2010, 2:10 p.m.
Countries: Botswana
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"In the case of maternity, after giving birth, the tradition requires women to stay home (botsetse) for a period of time, which may range from 14 to 90 days. This has now been institutionalised by allowing women take maternity leave. There is no official paternity leave for fathers. While men can take ordinary leave after the birth of a child, the absence of firm arrangements for paternity leave is likely to bolster stereotypes that place higher responsibility for the care of children on women." (38)
Feb. 22, 2010, 2:39 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1, SMPP-LAW-1, SMPP-DATA-1

"There is a tradition in parts of Nepal of keeping women in cow-sheds during their period. The practice is common in far western districts of the country. The Supreme Court has ordered the government to declare the practice as evil and given it one month to begin stamping the practice out. The court reached its decision on Wednesday. Women's rights activists say the court has upheld their right to equality. Pushpa Bhusal, a leading lawyer, said it was a positive move in removing the traditional discrimination against women. She warned however, that a change in the law alone would not be enough. She said people needed to be educated against ...more
Oct. 13, 2009, 5:59 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1, SMPP-LAW-1, SMPP-DATA-1

Many Indian women make do with little more than scraps of old cloth when menstruating. Since sanitary pads or cotton cloth is out of the price range of many Indians, millions of women are forced to get by with the little they have: strips of old clothes, rags, or nothing at all. Some women sit at home for five days a month. Women who use cloth strips are often embarrassed to let the fabric dry outside in plain view, and therefore risk using damp fabric rife with fungal or other organisms.
Oct. 13, 2009, 5:39 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

“Menstruation Leave - Wheather need special application During menstruation, women workers shall not be assigned work at high altitudes, low temperature, or in cold water, etc. Many enterprises have their own regulation to allow two days' menstruation leave, usually need the proven from urine test” (Paragraph 5).
Oct. 13, 2009, 5:21 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

“The Beijing Federation of Trade Unions has released the first Collective Contract Model Text . . . The contract says that three groups of employees, including those who have been accredited as model or advanced workers at the municipal level or above; those whose family members are all jobless; and those who have the elderly or children to take care of should be given priority to stay is there are staff layoffs. Female workers who have dysmenorrhea can take leave during their menstruation and still be duly paid” (Paragraph 4).
Oct. 13, 2009, 5:15 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

“The Chinese tradition of Zuo Yuezi (Cho Yuet in Cantonese) dictates that for 40 days from the birth of their children, mothers must stay inside and avoid bathing, washing their hair or brushing their teeth. They must cover their heads to prevent chills, keep the windows closed, and remain in bed for as long as possible. Zuo Yuezi – which loosely translates into doing the month – also requires mothers to avoid all forms of stress, including crying, shouting and talking for an entire cycle of the moon. While ‘doing the month,’ mothers can’t eat ‘cold’ foods such as cool drinks, ice cream, fruits or vegetables. Instead, they must load ...more
Sept. 15, 2009, 9:01 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"The amendment to the Labor Standard Act of September 2003 reduced the number of legal working hours from 44 to 40 and adjusted vacation regulations in line with international standards. Women’s monthly menstruation leave, previously a paid day of absence, became unpaid" (9).
Aug. 27, 2009, 10:06 a.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"The State shall endeavour to take appropriate measures to eliminate all forms of discrimination and exploitation against women including trafficking, prostitution, abuse, violence, harassment and intimidation at work in both public and private spheres" (20)
Feb. 9, 2009, 10:35 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"It's a brisk morning and 18-year-old Janaki Lujan and her child emerge from a small unheated shed. She is forced to stay here during her menstrual cycle. Like most women in remote western Nepal, after giving birth and during menstruation they are considered bad luck for the family. The local custom, 'Chaupadi,' prohibits them from entering the home at night. 'I'd like to stay in the house with my family, but I have no choice but to go to the shed. It's cold in winter and very hot in the summer. Many women are inside.' Every evening some ten women, including teenagers, gather in this shed. It's neither comfortable or ...more
Nov. 28, 2008, 2:31 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"Provisions in the Islamic civil and penal codes, in particular those sections dealing with family and property law, discriminate against women. Shortly after the 1979 revolution, the government repealed the 1967 Family Protection Law that provided women with increased rights in the home and workplace and replaced it with a legal system based largely on Shari'a practices."
May 26, 2008, 11:19 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"In the case of Federation of Dalits NGO Vs HMG/N (Writ No 3303, 2061 BS, 2 May 2005), the SC issued a directive order to the Government to declare Chhaupadi practice as a malpractice, and to form a study Committee of Health Workers and Children to work for public awareness and to formulate law, if required." (16) "Chhaupadi (it is a system to keep a woman in the isolated place far from the home during the menstruation time. At that time she is not allowed to use or touch anything used by other members of the family. This type of malpractice still exists in two zones of Nepal; Seti and ...more
May 19, 2008, 12:05 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"Although certain harmful traditional practices have been prohibited by law, the Committee expresses its continuing concern about the persistence of such practices that violate the rights of women and girls as...chaupadi (isolating a woman during menstruation because she is considered to be impure)...In this regard, the Committee regrets the lack of information contained in the State party's second periodic report about the full extent of such practices and the efforts being made to eradicate them." (4)
March 14, 2008, 3:44 p.m.
Countries: Kazakhstan
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"No negative national traditions are observed in practice with respect to young girls of any ethnic group living in Kazakhstan" (37).
Nov. 28, 2007, 7:33 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"Article 1, paragraph 4 of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Constitution provides total freedom of moving across entire Bosnia and Herzegovina. The entities have no right to disturb movement of persons, goods, services and capital in entire Bosnia and Herzegovina territory. Neither of entities can place any control on borders between entities" (42).
Sept. 21, 2007, 9:25 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"The amendment to the Labor Standard Act of September 2003 reduced the number of legal working hours from 44 to 40 and adjusted vacation regulations in line with international standards. Women's monthly menstruation leave, previously a paid day of absence, became unpaid" (9)
July 5, 2007, 12:43 a.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

""Art. 15 - Direct discrimination: Direct discrimination shall mean any distinction, exclusion or restriction made on the basis of gender which has the effect or purpose of impairing or nullifying the recognition, enjoyment or exercise by the other sex of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the political, economic, social, cultural, civil or any other field. Art.16 - Indirect discrimination: Indirect discrimination exists where a neutral provision, criterion or practice disadvantages a substantially higher proportion of the members of one sex, unless it is appropriate, necessary or can be justified by objective factors unrelated to sex"
July 5, 2007, 12:43 a.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

It would appear from the forgoing statements that menstruating women could not be kept out of public or private ventures. There is a possibility in art 16 that exclusion could be made but it would be difficult based on the total wording (SMS based on the 2003 CEDAW report). Does not appear to be applicable
June 30, 2007, 4:19 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

There is no segregation during menstruation
June 14, 2007, 6:19 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"Act No. 1/1951 provides for female employees to be given one and a half months leave before the expected date of childbirth and one and a half months after confinement or miscarriage (article 13(2))." Article 13 (1) of the same law "provides that female employees shall not be obliged to work on the first and second day of menstruation."
June 7, 2007, 12:57 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

There is no indication that this would happen in Tunisia but this would need to be confirmed by an expert on the region