The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for SMPP-PRACTICE-1

Feb. 28, 2018, 5:36 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"The Government has set aside funds to provide sanitary towels for girls in poor and marginalized areas as the lack of sanitary towels among poor girls was identified as one of the obstacles to girl child education since such girls would be forced to stay away from school during their monthly periods" (14).
Dec. 5, 2017, 12:54 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1, SMPP-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-DATA-1

"Another approach [to support formal education for girls], equally successful, was the distribution of menstrual 'cups' to adolescent girls in Nepal under the Menstruation and Education in Nepal Project. Such cups—small reusable silicone receptacles that can be inserted in the vaginal canal to collect menstrual blood and emptied after a period of 12 hours—are discreet. They facilitate the mobility of young women and allow school attendance during menstruation (Oster and Thornton 2009)"(49)
Dec. 5, 2017, 10:52 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"Take-home rations for pupils can be particularly effective in improving girls’ school enrollment. This strategy was used in Afghanistan, where the gender parity index (the enrollment of girls in schools as compared to boys) remains very low, at 0.35 in 2008 (WFP 2012, p. 32). There has been significant improvement since the overthrow of the Taliban in 2001, but cultural and religious norms, lack of separate sanitation facilities, and security concerns continue to have strong effects"(62). Lack of separate sanitation facilities could be a barrier for girls to attend school while menstruating (ENB-Coder Comment)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:09 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1

"However, an obstacle commonly faced in girls’ school enrollment is the absence of adequate sanitation facilities in schools. In Bangladesh, due to concerns that the absence of separate facilities for girls might be an obstacle to the success of the FSSAP mentioned earlier—particularly for adolescent girls who may prefer to avoid school attendance during menstruation—about 5,000 latrines and tubewells were built in schools taking part in the program. This appears to have been a major factor in attracting and retaining girls’ attendance"(49)
Aug. 21, 2017, 8:31 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

“The Sabarimala temple is one of a few in India which bars entry to women aged between 10 and 50 years old, saying that menstruating women are impure. Discrimination against menstruating women is common in some parts of south Asia, where they are forbidden from entering houses or temples and taking part in festivals and community events” (para 5).
Aug. 11, 2017, 10:32 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"'Today, it was 12 days of my child delivery. I am living in this shed since child delivery. I am here because myself and my baby is not allow to touch by family members at home. I am not living in this cowshed during menstruation and childbirth, but also all women members from my family are living here. My maternal house is in Humla, all women live in cowshed like this. I have already delivered five babies. I stayed a month here in cowshed during all childbirth. Here, the family members served food for only ten days then I am cooking myself. My two babies closed with god already. This ...more
Aug. 8, 2017, 2:57 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"According to the announcement, female workers in northwest China's Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region can take paid leave for one or two days if they are unable to carry out their work due to heavy menstruation or severe period pain. In such cases, they are required to obtain a medical certificate to prove their condition.So far, over 10 Chinese provinces have issued similar relevant documents, granting female workers special rights.However, as more and more provinces adopt the rules over paid leave, many commentators have expressed worries that the policies may come to nothing due to great difficulties in implementing the idea in practice"(para 2-4)."Reality shows little optimism for the implementation of ...more
July 17, 2017, 8:05 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

¨Even holy places — temples and mosques — it seems aren’t free from discriminating against the fair sex.The country has lately been in the grip of a nationwide furore over a few renowned temples banning women’s entry into their sanctum sanctorum. The reason given for the perpetration of such sexism is as flimsy as it’s regressive — women menstruate and are therefore `impure’ and unfit to enter shrines¨(para 1-2).However, unlike earlier, when such inequities would be par for the course, and taken by women in their stride, the ladies are now giving it back good by challenging ossified conventions and confronting their tormentors. Unprecedented statements like `menstruation is neither unclean ...more
April 15, 2017, 6:49 p.m.
Countries: Malawi
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"Most girls here can’t afford disposable pads — they use unhygienic cloths, or leaves. Many stay away from school when they have their period. Often, this leads to drop-out" (7).
Feb. 1, 2017, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"Much of what they learned in the village must be unlearned here. One evening when Baby begins preparing dinner, several of her roommates protest. She is menstruating, and caste tradition dictates that menstruating women must live in isolation, sleeping alone and taking care not to step into the kitchen, lest they contaminate the food and water. So two of the younger roommates cook, emerging an hour later with a glutinous, inedible glop. At this point, Baby is irritated. Menstruating women are allowed to work in the factory, aren’t they? She walks into the kitchen, and the scent of spices and onions fills the room. After a brief discussion, they agree ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"In 2013, I began my long-term project A Ritual of Exile, documenting the ways in which religious rituals are used to subjugate women across Asia. I began that project documenting the practice of Chhaupadi [the isolation of women from normal family activities while they are menstruating] in Nepal, and through this project, I came to know and understand more about the child widows. The stories of widows and the hardships they face is well-known, but particularly extreme" (para 16).
Nov. 30, 2016, 8:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"...the belief that a new mother should not go out until after the baptism, i.e. a week after the birth" (32).
Sept. 27, 2016, 4:55 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

“One evening when Baby begins preparing dinner, several of her roommates protest. She is menstruating, and caste tradition dictates that menstruating women must live in isolation, sleeping alone and taking care not to step into the kitchen, lest they contaminate the food and water. So two of the younger roommates cook, emerging an hour later with a glutinous, inedible glop. At this point, Baby is irritated. Menstruating women are allowed to work in the factory, aren’t they? She walks into the kitchen, and the scent of spices and onions fills the room. After a brief discussion, they agree that the menstruation rules will be void for as long as they ...more
Feb. 29, 2016, 11:39 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-2

"It is also concerned about the persistence of harmful traditional practices in the State party, such as child marriage, the dowry system, son preference, polygamy, widows accused of witchcraft, and such practices as chaupadi, jhuma, deuki and dhan-khaane" (4)
Feb. 19, 2016, 8:45 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"I had been taught how to make sanitary pads. I thought, if I can give a young girl pads it’ll allow her to stay in school during her monthly cycle" This statement is made at 11:39 of Kenya's Water Women by Rose Atieno. Atiento then proceeded to educate the girls [at a primary school near her home] on how to use the pads. This shows that there may not be social or religious customs requiring women to seclude themselves during menstruation but that lack of hygenic supplies limits women during mesntruation (ENB-coder Comment)
Jan. 27, 2016, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"'Because she's menstruating, she should not be entering another person's house. It's disrespectful,' says Cecile Shrestha of Wateraid.The nonprofit is working with girls and women in western Nepal to end a tradition called chaupadi — that's held them back for thousands of years: 'When they are menstruating, no matter what, they stay outside, they eat outside and they sleep outside,' Shrestha says.Outside in sheds. In Kamala's village they consist of a raised platform, with no walls, some have thatched roofs.Kamala tells us she'll sleep in one of those sheds tonight. We ask her to come closer to talk, but she covers her face with her hands and won't move.'She's scared ...more
Jan. 5, 2016, 9:52 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"'Society tells us when to get married, when to reproduce, and when to start covering ourselves. We are banned from going to temples when we are menstruating, and the moment we reach puberty, the public space available to us shrinks'" (para 26).
Dec. 4, 2015, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

“…in the Louga region…menstruation is considered ‘bad blood’ and often compared with an illness” (5)
Sept. 11, 2015, 1:16 p.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"When menstruating, women and girls are subjected to various prohibitions which may be religious (fasting, praying or going to holy places), food-related (ice cream, peanuts, lemon, sugar and gombo), domestic (doing laundry, going to the fields and braiding) or sexual (sharing the conjugal bed or having sexual relations)" (7)
June 25, 2015, 3:49 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"I have never heard of seclusion of menstruating or post-partum women".
April 20, 2015, 8:09 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"For many women in the far western parts of Nepal, Chhaupadi - a woman’s monthly menstrual cycle - is looked upon as a repulsive time that necessitates the expulsion of many women on their periods from their homes by loved ones only to live in cow, bull, or goat sheds during the 4-5 day period. This is a very ancient practice, which was the norm for every culture in the world at one time or another, and therefore it is up to every culture to find their own way into a modernity that is appropriate for them...Nevertheless, in many parts of western Nepal that are distant from the capital, underdeveloped ...more
Dec. 24, 2014, 1:59 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"A quarter of all women in the U.S. return to work fewer than 10 days after giving birth, leaving them less time to bond with their children, making breast-feeding more difficult and increasing their risk of postpartum depression" (para 7)
Dec. 9, 2014, 10:05 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Almost a quarter of Indian girls drop out of school when they start menstruating and the ones that remain miss on average five days a month" (para. 3)
Dec. 9, 2014, 10:03 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Nepal, Sierra Leone
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Menstruation affects educational access across much of the globe: more than 20 percent of girls in Sierra Leone miss school during their periods; in Nepal and Afghanistan 30 percent do" (para. 3)
Dec. 9, 2014, 10:01 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"'During our periods, we used to have to clean our sleeping areas with leaves and weren’t allowed to enter the house,' says 12-year-old Sushila who lives in Gorkha district, central Nepal. 'Now, we can sleep in our beds. We must be open about menstruation.' When Sushila first got her period, she had to stay home from school for 11 days. She wasn’t allowed to touch books. Sushila’s situation is common in much of Nepal: 95% of adolescent girls surveyed in the mid and western regions practice some kind of restrictions during their periods, from staying home from school or temple to having to sleep outside" (para. 1-2). "Her Turn run ...more
Nov. 23, 2014, 8:54 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"The practice prohibits women from having any contact with the world during their menstrual period. Each year, dozens of women die of cold or heat as a result. Now young women challenge Hindu taboos, launching an awareness campaign across the country" (Para 1). "Treated worse than animals for centuries, women in the western districts of Nepal have begun to rebel against Chhaupadi, a Hindu tradition that bans women from contacting others during their menstruation period. With the support of human rights organisations and NGOs, some young women have broken the wall of silence and rebelled against the practice by launching an awareness campaign across the country" (Para 2). "When Nepal ...more
Nov. 23, 2014, 8:54 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"'When I was a teenager, I was convinced that this practice was necessary to avoid the anger of the gods against my family,' said Janaki Buda, 43, from the village of Lokandra, who has had to put with her family's abuse for years. 'Over the years, I came to realise that Chhaupadi is just another inhuman treatment of women, due to ignorance and religious superstition,' she explained. Then 'One morning I decide to open my home to my sister even if it was prohibited and convinced her to go against this tradition. In a few months, other women in the village joined us and we began tearing down the huts ...more
Oct. 16, 2014, 10:43 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"Not having access to or being able to afford disposable sanitary pads or tampons like millions of their Western counterparts, desperate Ugandan girls will resort to using the local ebikokooma leaves, paper, old clothes and other materials as substitutes or even, as a health minister told a menstrual hygiene management conference this week, sitting in the sand until that time of the month is over" (para. 4). "But the 2012 Study on menstrual management in Uganda, conducted by the Netherlands Development Organisation (SNV) and IRC International Wash and Sanitation Centre in seven Ugandan districts, found that over 50 percent of senior female teachers confirmed there was no provision for menstrual ...more
Aug. 19, 2014, 12:20 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"menstruation has long been perceived as a social taboo. In many parts of the country, a woman on her period becomes essentially 'untouchable' – banned from cooking, handling water or entering places of worship" (para. 6). "A fine example of this is Soumya Selvi, a 10th-grade student in a girls’ school in Srirangam, a town located about 320 km south of Chennai city in southern India. Three years ago, Selvi and her fellow classmates were privy to a UNESCO-led reproductive health campaign, and became virtual ambassadors for the issue. Selvi alone has shared her knowledge with nearly 50 other girls in her school and her neighborhood. She has also not ...more
Dec. 10, 2013, 9:32 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"These new assertions coexist with age-old discriminations and practices, like the inhuman treatment accorded to menstruating women in western Nepal because they are considered 'unclean'. This is why it is important that a campaign like OBR strikes a chord, especially among young people" (para 11)