The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

Nov. 10, 2017, 1:02 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3, TRAFF-LAW-3, IRP-LAW-2

"The law criminalizes defection and attempted defection, including the attempt to gain entry to a foreign diplomatic facility for the purpose of seeking political asylum. Individuals who cross the border with the purpose of defecting or seeking asylum in a third country are subject to a minimum of five years of 'labor correction.' In 'serious' cases defectors or asylum seekers are subjected to indefinite terms of imprisonment and forced labor, confiscation of property, or death. Many would-be refugees who were returned involuntarily were imprisoned under harsh conditions"(10)."The law does not provide for the granting of asylum or refugee status, nor has the government established a system for providing protection for ...more
Oct. 2, 2017, 7:19 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"So far, over 3,000 defendants have passed through their doors. The concept behind the HTIC is to help women caught up in the sex trade, to recover from their experiences, and to exit prostitution. A defendant can be referred to drug treatment or immigrant legal services, as well as being offered general support and counselling. The HTIC is partnered with a large network of counsellors and court advocates, including two that work with the Asian women that make up the majority of the defendants in the Queens courtroom"(para 2)
Sept. 15, 2017, 7:06 p.m.
Countries: France
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"'The most important aspect of this law is to accompany prostitutes, give them identity papers because we know that 85 percent of prostitutes here are victims of trafficking,' Maud Olivier, a lawmaker with the governing Socialists and a sponsor of the legislation, told The Associated Press.Olivier said that many of the sex workers who arrive in France have their passports confiscated by pimps.'We will provide them with documents on the condition they commit to leave prostitution behind,' she added"(para 7-9)
Nov. 9, 2016, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Actual combat may have ended almost a decade ago in northern Uganda, but for many women abducted by the rebel Lord’s Resistance Army and the children they conceived in captivity, the war is far from over. Sexual exploitation, beatings, stigmatization and community rejection, lack of medical care and education, and deprivation of land rights are among the challenges faced by those who escaped from or were released by the LRA"(para 1)
July 1, 2016, 5:48 p.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"There were no reports the government detained, fined, or jailed victims for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to trafficking. During the reporting period, the immigration department initiated drafting of proposed amendments to the immigration act to provide immunity from prosecution to victims and witnesses of trafficking, to conform that law to the provisions of the People Trafficking and People Smuggling (Prohibition) Act, and to create a renewable permit specific to trafficking victims allowing them to remain in Swaziland for up to two years" (321)
June 4, 2016, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Zimbabwe
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government may have detained and deported potential trafficking victims due to a lack of proactive victim identification procedures" (369)
June 4, 2016, 10:15 a.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government failed to proactively identify and provide adequate protection services to trafficking victims among vulnerable groups, such as women in prostitution and foreign migrants. As a result, the government did not ensure trafficking victims were not inappropriately incarcerated, fined, or otherwise penalized for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking, such as prostitution or immigration violations" (366)
June 3, 2016, 9:33 p.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government reportedly encouraged trafficking victims to assist in judicial proceedings against traffickers and offered some protection and compensation to victims, yet victims expressed trepidation to use them given the endemic social stigma attached to being a victim, fear of retribution in their local communities, and fear of punishment for illegal acts committed in the course of being subjected to trafficking. Vietnamese law protects victims from being prosecuted for actions taken as a consequence of being subjected to trafficking; however, officials are not properly trained in identification of trafficking victims, which may have led to the treatment of some victims as criminals" (364)
June 2, 2016, 5:40 p.m.
Countries: Venezuela
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"There were no publicly available reports of victims being jailed or penalized for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking. Foreign victims who faced retribution if returned to their country of origin could apply for refugee status, but it was unclear if any victims did so in 2013" (362)
June 2, 2016, 5:30 p.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"There were reports that potential transnational sex and labor trafficking victims who had illegally crossed the Uzbekistani border faced a criminal penalty of a substantial fine and imprisonment. Formally recognized victims were exempt by law from prosecution for acts committed as a result of being trafficked. When victims were nonetheless charged, NGOs reported success in having charges dropped" (360)
June 1, 2016, 8:15 p.m.
Countries: Uruguay
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"There were no reports trafficking victims were jailed, deported, or otherwise penalized for acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking" (358)
June 1, 2016, 7:49 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Some trafficking victims, including those under 18 years of age, were detained or prosecuted for conduct committed as a direct result of being subjected to trafficking. NGOs reported many state and local authorities failed to treat sex-trafficked children as victims of trafficking by arresting and incarcerating them, including in states with 'safe harbor' laws designed to protect them from such criminalization. Further, NGOs reported state and local law enforcement continued to arrest some identified trafficking victims in order to ensure they would have access to services through detention, and, in some cases, to obtain testimony against their trafficker. To address these challenges, HHS facilitated training with advocates, attorneys, and service ...more
May 31, 2016, 8:25 p.m.
Countries: United Kingdom
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"NGOs and court findings indicated the government continued to prosecute and sentence child and adult trafficking victims for crimes committed as a result of their trafficking, despite prosecutorial guidance and court rulings to the contrary. Some victims were penalized despite officials’ acknowledgement they were trafficking victims. In 2014, a trafficking expert reported the government prosecuted a Vietnamese child for cannabis cultivation who had received a reasonable grounds decision, and a judge sentenced two Vietnamese men to a year in prison and deportation for cultivating cannabis, while acknowledging the men had been enslaved" (351)
May 31, 2016, 7:48 p.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"In January 2015, the government promulgated an amendment to Federal Law 51 of 2006 on the protection of trafficking victims, including provisions to ensure victims are not penalized for crimes committed as a direct result of being subjected to trafficking, depending on the nature of the case. Prior to the amendment’s passage, unidentified victims of sex trafficking and forced labor may have been penalized through incarceration, fines, or deportation for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to trafficking, such as prostitution or immigration violations. For example, in some cases UAE authorities deemed female domestic workers who fled their employers as criminals, raising concerns victim identification procedures ...more
May 31, 2016, 6:02 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Street children, including potential trafficking victims, are often temporarily held for up to three months at an under-resourced MGLSD juvenile detention center that provided food, medical treatment, counseling, basic education, and family-tracing services. Reports indicate police and communities treat street children as criminals, arbitrarily arresting, detaining, and beating them, and forcing them to clean detention facilities. The government has not established appropriate systems to ensure such children do not reappear on the streets" (345)
May 31, 2016, 5:39 p.m.
Countries: Turkmenistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"At times, authorities punished trafficking victims for crimes committed as a result of being subjected to trafficking. After Turkmen victims returned home following their deportation from other countries, the SMS reportedly blocked them from exiting Turkmenistan for a period of up to five years and fined them for overstaying their visas while abroad. The government made no attempts to identify sex trafficking victims among women arrested for engaging in prostitution and, consequently, officials may have penalized sex trafficking victims for prostitution offenses" (343)
May 30, 2016, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government did not ensure trafficking victims were not punished for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking. For example, front-line police officers often failed to identify sex trafficking victims, particularly among women in prostitution, and deported them without providing them access to victim assistance" (341)
May 30, 2016, 7:35 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government did not implement systematic policies and procedures to protect unidentified victims from punishment as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking, such as women or children in prostitution or illegal immigrants" (340)
May 30, 2016, 7:15 p.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government did not punish any identified trafficking victims for crimes committed as a direct result of a trafficking situation; however, unidentified victims were vulnerable to being inadvertently punished or charged with immigration or prostitution violations. Two of the victims identified during the reporting period, both Venezuelan women, were temporarily held in immigration detention after their traffickers released them. The counter-trafficking unit intervened for their release and referred them to care" (338)
May 30, 2016, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Togo
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"There were no reports of child victims being penalized for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to trafficking; the government does not consider adults as trafficking victims and, therefore, some unidentified adult victims may have been penalized for such crimes" (336)
May 30, 2016, 4 p.m.
Countries: East Timor
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Authorities did not screen for indicators of trafficking among vulnerable groups, such as individuals in prostitution; government officials acknowledged some victims may have been among those arrested and deported, particularly foreign women in prostitution apprehended for immigration violations" (335)
May 30, 2016, 3:37 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Thai law protects victims from being prosecuted for acts committed as a result of being subjected to trafficking; however, the serious flaws in the Thai government’s victim identification procedures and its aggressive efforts to arrest and deport immigration violators increased victims’ risk of being re-victimized and treated as criminals" (333)
May 29, 2016, 9:30 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

New regulations for interviewing potential trafficking victims were only approved in January 2015; therefore the government was unable to ensure victims were not punished for crimes committed as a result of being subjected to trafficking during the reporting period" (330)
May 29, 2016, 9:06 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"As law enforcement officials did not attempt to proactively identify trafficking victims among women in prostitution, it was possible officials detained or penalized sex trafficking victims for prostitution crimes" (328)
May 29, 2016, 8:40 p.m.
Countries: Taiwan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Although victims could receive immunity for crimes committed as a result of being subjected to trafficking, NGOs reported authorities occasionally treated trafficking victims as criminals" (327)
May 27, 2016, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government subjected children, who were forcibly recruited and used by opposition groups, to arrest, detention, rape, torture, and execution for affiliation with these groups; the government made no efforts to exempt these children from punishment or to offer them any protection services. The government neither encouraged trafficking victims to assist in investigations or prosecutions of their traffickers nor provided foreign victims with legal alternatives to their removal to countries in which they may face hardship or retribution" (326)
May 27, 2016, 1:54 p.m.
Countries: Switzerland
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Observers found trafficking victims in asylum proceedings were not referred to care...Experts reported authorities deported some victims despite criminal proceedings having been launched on the basis of information the victims provided. Additionally, authorities were reported to have deported victims who provided unclear statements, which experts assess was due to their psychological trauma. Observers found some sex trafficking victims were penalized for prostitution violations prior to their identification as victims" (324)
May 26, 2016, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"GRETA referenced reports of Swedish authorities deporting irregular migrants who had been subjected to trafficking without identifying them as potential victims, despite the presence of trafficking indicators. Observers reported foreign victims who were not ready to provide evidence to law enforcement were quickly removed from Sweden; GRETA reported concern that expedited removal did not permit adequate risk assessments of repatriating victims" (323)
May 26, 2016, 5:38 p.m.
Countries: Suriname
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"There were no reports of trafficking victims penalized for crimes committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking" (320)
May 26, 2016, 5:21 p.m.
Countries: Suriname
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"There were no reports of trafficking victims penalized for crimes committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking" (320)