The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

Feb. 15, 2020, 9:16 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"As for victims’ protection, in accordance with the relevant European Directive, the above Legislative Decree also amended the Italian Code of Criminal Procedure in order to extend the existing protection — already envisaged for child victims or mentally-ill adult victims — to all adult victims being under particularly vulnerable conditions. To further strengthen the protection system, the above Legislative Decree envisages the obligation to adequately inform victims of their rights, especially those unaccompanied minors being victims of trafficking; this also establishes that a further Decree will be adopted to define specific mechanisms as for the determination of their age and identification. Thus, trafficked children are provided with special assistance and...more
Jan. 30, 2020, 1:05 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The IOM reported that both the government and Houthi-Saleh rebels detained migrants due to concerns that they could be recruited by the other party. While the government was able to deport migrants back to their country of origin, the Houthi-Saleh rebels generally detained migrants for indefinite periods. The IOM worked with the rebels to assist the migrants while in detention. Separately, UNHCR and the IOM worked together to provide assisted voluntary returns for migrants and assisted spontaneous returns for Somali refugees" (21).
Jan. 29, 2020, 11:11 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Whereas the Committee’s previous concluding observations have stated that victims of trafficking are “being treated as illegal immigrants and deported without redress or remedy,” this is not true. For foreign victims who had been in violation of the Immigration Control Act, such as illegal stay, the government has been making efforts to stabilize their legal status by giving them special permission to stay in Japan for residence. Among the foreign victims to whom the Immigration Bureau have extended protection or provided repatriation assistance to date, all 115 victims who were in violation of the Immigration Control Act have been given special permission to stay in Japan for residence." (53).more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Moldova
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Authorities granted foreign victims a 30-day reflection period, during which they could receive assistance and protection from deportation; if foreign victims chose to cooperate with law enforcement, they received temporary residence. Victims who could not be repatriated due to safety concerns could receive shelter-in-country, although no such cases were reported in 2018. Victims often struggled to find pro bono legal representation and relied on legal assistance provided by NGOs and international organizations. The weak capacity of social workers in outlying regions led to inefficient and poor quality services offered to victims. These deficiencies contributed to the continued risk of re-victimization (...) Similarly, when authorities reclassified sex trafficking cases to pimping...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Finland
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"A study commissioned by the government revealed mandatory police involvement in domestic cases strongly deterred victim cooperation due to fear of consequences, distrust with authorities, or belief that the police would not keep them safe from their traffickers (...) To receive long-term assistance, Finnish law requires victims to either cooperate with police to commence a criminal investigation or receive a specialized residence permit from Finnish Immigration Services. Finnish law allowed foreign victims a six-month reflection period during which they could receive care and assistance while considering whether to assist law enforcement, and the law allowed legal residents a recovery period of up to three months. Victims could receive renewable temporary...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The Aliens Act entitled victims to a 30-day reflection period to contemplate cooperation with law enforcement, during which they were eligible for emergency financial aid; however, only an investigating police officer or prosecutor could file the application, limiting availability to victims already in contact with law enforcement. Victims in trafficking cases who cooperated with authorities received temporary residence permits, which allowed them to seek employment. Fifty-four trafficking victims received permits in 2018 (13 in 2017). Prosecutors had the power to file applications for permanent residence permits on behalf of victims based on protection needs, such as in cases in which victims would face retribution in their countries of origin; the...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The Immigration Act granted the government authority to provide temporary residence permits for foreign victims to assist police with investigations, and it insulated victims against prosecution for immigration-related crimes traffickers compelled them to commit.. However, the government did not report identifying any foreign victims during the reporting period, nor did it report providing services to foreign victims identified in previous years. The government did not report if it would extend these protections to victims whose cases were investigated under the penal code" (431).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Slovakia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government offered repatriation services for foreign victims, but it did not repatriate any victims in the reporting period" (427).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Foreign trafficking victims could obtain either a nine-month residence permit or a one-year renewable residence permit, which was available to victims who cooperated with law enforcement or who faced retribution or hardship in their home countries. The government did not issue any temporary residence permits in 2017 or 2018. The government amended the Act on Foreign Nationals to allow potential victims who received residence permits on the basis of trafficking to obtain work permits for the duration of their residence permits" (242).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Foreign trafficking victims could apply for a temporary resident permit (TRP) to remain in Canada, which entitled victims to access health care and receive a work permit. The government issued TRPs to 40 foreign victims and their dependents in 2018, compared to 32 in 2017 and 67 in 2016. The government provided foreign victims eligibility for short-term 180-day TRPs or long-term three-year TRPs, but NGOs reported long wait times to receive TRPs. TRP holders could apply for fee-exempt work permits, but the government did not report how many foreign victims received permits in 2018. NGOs also reported need for more trauma-informed care for victims, whom the health care system sometimes...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Authorities repatriated four Guatemalan victims from abroad in 2018. Authorities repatriated two Honduran trafficking victims in coordination with foreign consular officials and in accordance with an established protocol. Civil society expressed concern some adult foreign victims chose to leave shelters and return to their home countries due to lengthy investigation processes" (222). "Guatemalan law provided legal alternatives to the removal of foreign victims who may face hardship or retribution upon return to their home countries, but all known foreign victims opted for repatriation. Foreign victims had the same access to care as domestic trafficking victims" (223).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The anti-trafficking law required police protection for victims who participated as witnesses in criminal proceedings against traffickers, but the government did not report any victims utilizing these services. Although Mozambican law provided for temporary residency status or legal alternatives to the removal of foreign victims to countries where they might face hardship or retribution, the government did not use this provision during the reporting period" (346).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"NGOs reported the government did not consistently provide repatriation assistance to victims who declined to participate in law enforcement investigations. In collaboration with a foreign government, the government published a handbook for social workers to streamline the reintegration process for Thai victims" (462). "The law protected victims from prosecution for unlawful acts their traffickers compelled them to commit; however, flaws in the government’s implementation of victim identification procedures increased the risk of authorities penalizing victims, including for prostitution and immigration violations" (464).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government provided foreign victims with legal alternatives to their removal to countries where they faced retribution or hardship. The government encouraged victims to assist in the investigation and prosecution of their traffickers; foreign victims also had the option to provide a deposition prior to being repatriated. However, victims were not able to file civil suits against their traffickers for compensation" (275).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Foreign victims were entitled to the same benefits as Ukrainian citizens and had additional access to interpretation services, temporary legal stay, and voluntary repatriation. Legislation that would allow foreign victims to remain in Ukraine for extended periods and work legally remained pending with the government. There was no legal way for foreign victims to extend their stay, change legal residency, secure employment rights, or seek protection from deportation to countries where they would face hardship or retribution" (484).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Ugandan law permitted foreign trafficking victims to remain in Uganda during the investigation of their cases and to apply for residence and work permits, but the government did not report any victims applying for such benefits during the reporting period (...) While the 2009 anti-trafficking act prohibits the penalization of trafficking victims for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking, reports from prior years indicated that the government detained and placed on bond some trafficking victims, including children, in an attempt to compel them to cooperate with and periodically report to law enforcement in support of criminal investigations" (481).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government continued to severely punish victims for unlawful acts traffickers compelled them to commit, such as child soldiering and prostitution. It routinely arrested, detained, raped, tortured, and executed children for alleged association with armed groups; the government made no effort to offer these children any protection services. The government neither encouraged trafficking victims to assist in investigations or prosecutions of their traffickers nor provided foreign victims with legal alternatives to their removal to countries in which they may face hardship or retribution" (451).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The anti-trafficking law prohibited the penalization of trafficking victims for unlawful acts committed as a result of being subjected to trafficking, including by armed groups. However, multiple credible international organizations reported the government continued to arrest and in some cases detain for prolonged periods, reportedly for screening and perceived intelligence value, women and children removed from or allegedly associated with Boko Haram and ISIS-WA, including women and girls who had been forcibly married to or sexually enslaved by the insurgents; authorities did not consistently screen for trafficking" (363). "The government did not have a formal policy to prevent the removal of victims to countries where they would face hardship or...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government maintained efforts to identify and refer some trafficking victims to protection; however, unidentified victims, especially among the sub-Saharan African migrant population, remained vulnerable to penalization" (73). "The government provided foreign victims with legal alternatives to their removal to countries where they faced retribution or hardship. The government reported it allowed relief from deportation for identified trafficking victims for an indefinite period of time and allowed all foreign victims to stay in Algeria temporarily; however, it did not grant work permits to trafficking victims while under temporary residency status. The government did not report if it encouraged victims to participate in the investigation and prosecution of traffickers. Trafficking victims...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Ecuador
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government had mechanisms to repatriate victims, and Ecuadorian diplomatic and consular missions abroad had funding to provide food, lodging, and airplane tickets to Ecuadorian victims seeking repatriation" (188).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Papua New Guinea
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The victim identification procedures included guidance for protecting foreign victims from punishment for immigration crimes committed as a result of trafficking. However, authorities punished some victims for such crimes due to ineffective victim identification, in the context of poor interagency coordination and a lack of clarity over who had the authority to verify an individual as a victim of trafficking (...) The law provided legal alternatives to the removal of foreign victims to countries where they may face hardship or retribution, but the government did not report offering this protection to any victims in 2018. The government allowed 'ongoing stay' for trafficking victims but did not extend the service to...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"There were no reports officials penalized victims for unlawful acts traffickers compelled them to commit; however, some victims may have remained unidentified and subsequently penalized due to the government’s failure to employ systematic measures to identify trafficking victims among vulnerable populations. The law provided for the possibility of granting victims legal residency in Niger, including the ability to obtain employment, if it was unsafe for them to return to their countries of origin. Multilateral organizations reported Algeria deported thousands of migrants to Niger during the year—including more than 2,000 children who were vulnerable to trafficking due to their lack of economic security and access to justice" (360).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Costa Rica
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government facilitated the repatriation of two victims in 2018, compared to one in 2017" (165).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government did not offer legal alternatives to removal to countries in which victims would face retribution or hardship, and it did not have formal policies to encourage victims to participate in trials against their traffickers. Victims could file civil suits against their traffickers, but the government did not report that any did so during the reporting period" (322).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Dominican Republic
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government coordinated housing and an airline ticket for a Dominican victim in Nicaragua, as well as an airplane ticket for a Dominican victim in Bahrain" (184).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Burkina Faso
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Foreign victims who faced hardship or retribution in their country of origin could apply for asylum, but there were no reports trafficking victims applied for asylum during the reporting period" (123). "There were no reports of trafficking victims penalized for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to trafficking; however, without uniform implementation of victim identification measures, including among vulnerable populations, some victims could have been left unidentified in the law enforcement system" (123).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Albania
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Foreign victims had access to the same services as domestic victims and the law provided foreign victims a three-month reflection period with temporary residency status and authorization to work for up to two years. The government granted or renewed residency to seven foreign victims (six in 2017). Unlike some previous years, the government did not knowingly penalize victims, but may have penalized some trafficking victims due to inadequate identification efforts. Five victims cooperated with law enforcement in investigations and prosecutions (23 in 2017); however, the government did not consistently apply a victim-centered approach to investigations and prosecutions. Law enforcement did not consistently offer sufficient security and support, and victims and...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: France
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government had an NGO-run referral program to transfer victims detained, arrested, or placed in protective custody by law enforcement authorities to institutions that provided short-term care (…) Victims were eligible for temporary residence permits, regardless of whether they cooperated with police investigations. Trafficking victims were also eligible for international protection under refugee status or subsidiary protection status in cases where victims had a credible fear of retaliation, including from public authorities in their country of origin, if returned. However, a large collective of anti-trafficking NGOs believed the new law on asylum and immigration, which eased restrictions on migrant deportation, limited victims’ ability to receive temporary residence due to new...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Gambia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"away from the shelter and their whereabouts were unknown. The fourth victim, a minor, was repatriated back to her home in Nigeria with the assistance of an international organization. The shelter could assist Gambian victims exploited abroad after their repatriation, as well as both foreign and domestic victims. An international organization assisted the government to repatriate trafficking victims from Lebanon identified in previous reporting periods. During the reporting period, the government also secured funding from an international organization for trafficking victims repatriated from Lebanon in 2016; the victims received a reintegration package equivalent to 50,000 dalasi ($1,000) to be used for vocational training. NAATIP also partnered with an NGO to...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Officials reportedly detained and deported Afghan migrants, including children, who did not comply with coerced recruitment by Iranian officials to fight in Syria" (252). "The government did not encourage trafficking victims to assist in the investigation or prosecution of traffickers and did not provide witness support services. Based on available information, it did not provide foreign trafficking victims legal alternatives to their removal to countries in which they may face hardship or retribution" (253).