The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for VOTE-DATA-2

Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“In the 2012 general election, 67.0 percent of women were registered to vote and 58.5 percent voted, compared with 63.1 percent and 54.4 percent of men” (5)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“In the 1998 and 2000 elections combined, 64.6 percent of women aged 18 and older registered to vote and 49.3 percent voted. In the 2010 and 2012 elections combined, 64.3 percent of women registered to vote, and 50.6 percent went to the polls” (4)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“In 2012, black and non-Hispanic white women had the highest voting rates among the total female population aged 18 and older, at 66.1 percent and 64.5 percent, respectively (U.S. Department of Commerce 2013). Their voting rates were approximately twice as high as the rates for Hispanic women (33.9 percent) and Asian women (32.0 percent)” (5)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Overall, 81.7 million women reported having registered to vote in 2012 and 71.4 million voted, compared with approximately 71.5 million men who said they had registered to vote and 61.6 million who cast a ballot” (6)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Nationwide, voting rates also vary considerably among women of different ages. Young women have a much lower voting rate than older women. In the 2012 election, 41.3 percent of women aged 18–24 voted, compared with 58.5 percent of adult women overall. Women aged 65–74 had the highest voting rate in 2012 at 70.1 percent, followed by women aged 75 years and older (65.6 percent), women aged 45–64 years (65.0 percent), and women aged 25–44 years (52.6 percent)” (6)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

On page 3, Table 1.1, titled “How the States Measure Up: Women’s Status on the Political Participation Composite Index and Its Components” shows that an average of 64.3% of women were registered to vote in 2010 and 2012. 50.6% of women voted in those years’ elections (3)
May 2, 2018, 9:29 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"Yet in the last two national elections (2013 and 2014), women made up about 53 per cent of the voters" (para 5).
March 9, 2018, 8:49 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"Eighty-one per cent of women entitled to vote voted" (32).
Feb. 14, 2018, 11:45 a.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"Palestinian women took part in the first Palestinian legislative and presidential elections in 1996. Although 49 per cent of registered voters were women, they were only 32 percent of actual voters, while 58 per cent were men" (25). "the proportion of women who voted was greater than in the previous election, as can be seen from the following table" (26). The table following this sentence actually shows a decline in the number of women voters. The percentage of women on voting rolls decreased from 49.7 in 2004-2005 to 47.8 percent in 2012-2013. More significantly, the percentage of ballots cast by women compared to total ballots cast was 47.8 in 2004-2005...more
Feb. 7, 2018, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: VOTE-LAW-1, VOTE-DATA-2

"Voter turnout in general elections has increased in the past 2 elections (2006 and 2010). In the Riksdag election in 2010 voter turnout was 84.6 per cent. Since 1973 voter turnout has been higher for women than for men. At the Riksdag election in 2010 their voter turnout was 1 percentage point higher. Voter turnout for young women aged 18-24 years is 4 percentage points higher than for men in the same age group" (page 28).
Dec. 26, 2017, 10:52 p.m.
Countries: Panama
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"Women participated in political life on the same basis as men"(13). For the last election the overall voter turnout was 10% (ENB-Coder Comment)
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

Table 1.1 shows that 64.3% of women are registered to vote (2010/2012 average) and 50.6% of women actually voted (2010/2012 average) (3)
June 13, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Women’s voter turnout was higher than men’s in the District of Columbia and 39 states in 2010. Among jurisdictions where women’s voter turnout exceeded men’s, the greatest differences were in Mississippi (7.6 points) and the District of Columbia (6.1 points). In 2012, women’s voter turnout was higher than men’s in all but two states, Arizona and North Dakota (the same two states where women’s voter registration was also lower than men’s in this year). The largest differences in voter turnout rates were in South Carolina and Louisiana, where women’s turnout was higher than men’s by 10.6 and 9.0 percentage points, respectively” (7)
June 13, 2017, 11 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Women’s voter turnout was lowest in Texas in 2010/2012, where only 40.9 percent of women reported voting. Voter turnout in Texas was substantially lower than in the second and third worst states, California (44.7 percent) and Hawaii (45.1 percent). Other states that ranked among the bottom ten for women’s voter turnout include Arizona, Arkansas, Nevada, New York, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia” (7)
June 13, 2017, 10:59 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“In 26 states, women’s voter registration increased between the 1998/2000 elections and the 2010/2012 elections, while in 24 states and the District of Columbia women’s voter registration decreased. The states with the largest increases in women’s voter registration were Mississippi (6.0 percentage points) and Arizona (5.1 percentage points). The states with the greatest decreases were North Dakota and Minnesota (17.4 and 7.4 percentage points, respectively)” (6)
June 13, 2017, 10:59 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“In 2010, women were more likely to be registered to vote than men in all but three states: Alaska, Montana, and New Hampshire. The state with the greatest gender gap in voter registration was Mississippi, where women’s voter registration exceeded men’s by 9.5 percentage points. In 2012, the same general pattern held true: a higher percentage of women were registered to vote than men in all but two states, Arizona and North Dakota. South Carolina had the largest gender gap in voter registration in this year, with a rate for women that was 8.4 percentage points higher than the rate for men” (6)
June 13, 2017, 10:58 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Women’s voter registration is lowest overall in the western part of the United States. Hawaii had the lowest reported women’s voter registration rate in 2010/2012 at 52.3 percent, followed by California (53.8 percent) and Nevada (56.2 percent). Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah also rank in the bottom ten. They are joined by two Mid-Atlantic states—New Jersey and New York—and one Southern state [Florida] (6)
June 13, 2017, 10:58 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Mississippi and Louisiana had the highest voter registration rates for women in 2010 and 2012 combined at 80.8 percent and 76.9 percent, respectively. Six states in the Midwest—Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin—and two states in the Northeast (Maine and Vermont) were also in the top ten” (6)
June 13, 2017, 10:57 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Young women have a much lower voting rate than older women. In the 2012 election, 41.3 percent of women aged 18–24 voted, compared with 58.5 percent of adult women overall. Women aged 65–74 had the highest voting rate in 2012 at 70.1 percent, followed by women aged 75 years and older (65.6 percent), women aged 45–64 years (65.0 percent), and women aged 25–44 years (52.6 percent). Overall, 81.7 million women reported having registered to vote in 2012 and 71.4 million voted, compared with approximately 71.5 million men who said they had registered to vote and 61.6 million who cast a ballot” (6)
June 13, 2017, 10:57 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Women’s voting rates vary across the largest racial and ethnic groups. In 2012, black and non-Hispanic white women had the highest voting rates among the total female population aged 18 and older, at 66.1 percent and 64.5 percent, respectively...Their voting rates were approximately twice as high as the rates for Hispanic women (33.9 percent) and Asian women (32.0 percent; published rates from the U.S. Census Bureau are not available for Native American women). The higher voting rate among black women compared with non-Hispanic white women reflects a shift that first occurred in the 2008 elections, differing from the voting patterns of the elections up to 2004, when a larger share...more
June 13, 2017, 10:57 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“Nationally, 61.5 percent of women were registered to vote in the 2010 midterm election and 42.7 percent voted, compared with 57.9 percent of men who registered to vote and 40.9 percent who cast a ballot...In the 2012 general election, 67.0 percent of women were registered to vote and 58.5 percent voted, compared with 63.1 percent and 54.4 percent of men” (5)
June 13, 2017, 10:56 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“In the 1998 and 2000 elections combined, 64.6 percent of women aged 18 and older registered to vote and 49.3 percent voted. In the 2010 and 2012 elections combined, 64.3 percent of women registered to vote, and 50.6 percent went to the polls” (4)
June 13, 2017, 10:55 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“the percentage of women who registered to vote was lower in the 2010/2012 elections than in the 1998/2000 elections, but the percentage of women who went to the polls increased during this period” (4)
March 14, 2017, 10:46 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"Today, Indian women hold only 12 percent of seats in the lower and upper houses of parliament in the world’s largest democracy—a disparity that some experts link to low historical female voter turnout, among other factors" (para 3).
Feb. 2, 2017, 7:39 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"in the last two national elections (2013 and 2014), women made up about 53 per cent of the voters" (para 11).
July 27, 2016, 5:18 p.m.
Countries: Barbados
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

Table 7 on page 24, titled Barbados General Elections 2003, shows that 104,304 men were registered to vote but only 59,732 actually voted. There were 115,789 women registered and 74,580 voted. The document states on page 24 that “Women in Barbados have had consistently higher voter turnout rates in national elections than men as they have taken advantage of the lack of legal or social impediments to their political participation” (24)
July 27, 2016, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

“In the June 2014 runoff election the IEC estimated a turnout of nearly eight million voters, including 38 percent women” (28).
July 5, 2016, 7:37 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"As of December 2009, of a total of 250,268 registered electors, 128,091 were women, which correspond to 51.2% of all voters. Since the last report, there was not only a significant increase of women voters but also this increase exceeded the increase of the number of men voters." (16)
May 31, 2016, 9:51 p.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"The voter composition in 2008 elections was 52% female from a total of 79.4% of the electorate exercising their franchise. In the 2013 general elections the female voter composition was 50.25%, which again is higher than the male voter composition. This clearly establishes women exercising their franchise more responsibly" (24).
May 15, 2016, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"In the last parliamentary elections, out of total number of registered voters equalling 498,825 (80.44% of the total population) there were 250,165 women which accounts for 50.15%. The number of women MPs in the new Parliament remained unchanged compared to the previous one and out of the total of 81 MPs, there are 9 which accounts for 11%." (35)