The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for VOTE-PRACTICE-1

April 9, 2019, 12:57 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Restrictions on media, including censoring campaign materials and preventing prominent opposition figures from speaking publicly, limited the freedom and fairness of the elections" (1).
April 5, 2019, 11:16 a.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"No laws limit participation of women… in the political process, and they did participate; however, traditional male dominance limited the role of women in government" (7).
April 4, 2019, 3:14 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"No laws limit participation of women in the political process, and they did participate" (12).
March 29, 2019, 5:33 p.m.
Countries: Malawi
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-3, VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Cultural and traditional gender bias and lower levels of literacy, education, and economic empowerment prevented women from participating in the political process to the same extent as men" (para 72).
March 25, 2019, 2:20 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Some Muslim groups complained that registration procedures unfairly discriminated against them in proving citizenship or completing registration, including by discriminating against traditionally Muslim-sounding names; many women who wear the hijab were required by elections registrars to remove their head covering for registration photos, whereas women in traditional Liberian headdresses were not required to do so" (19). "Moreover, several Muslim groups noted other forms of discrimination when trying to register to vote, including a group of women in hijab who were told they had to remove their head coverings completely for their registration photo, when non-Muslim women wearing traditional head coverings were not told to remove them" (28).
March 22, 2019, 9:38 a.m.
Countries: Maldives
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1, VOTE-LAW-1

"No laws limit participation of women in the political process, and they did participate" (20).
March 21, 2019, 11:12 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-3, LBHO-LAW-1, VOTE-PRACTICE-1, VOTE-LAW-1

"Women and minorities generally participated in the political system without formal restriction, although significant cultural and social barriers largely excluded women from decision-making positions" (para 175).
March 18, 2019, 2:22 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Observers considered the presidential election in May and legislative elections in 2016 free and fair" (1).
March 15, 2019, 11:35 a.m.
Countries: Vanuatu
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Traditional attitudes regarding male dominance and customary familial roles hampered women’s participation in political life" (6).
March 12, 2019, 12:43 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"The most recent national elections, held in 2014, were neither free nor fair" (1). "Citizens do not have the ability to choose their government peacefully" (16). "The most recent national elections to select representatives to the Supreme People’s Assembly (SPA) occurred in 2014. These elections were neither free nor fair. The government openly monitored voting, resulting in a reported 100 percent participation rate and 100 percent approval of the preselected government candidates. Local elections on July 2015 were likewise neither free nor fair. The government reported a 99.97 percent turnout, with 100 percent approval for the government candidates" (16). "The government regularly criticized the concept of free elections and competition...more
March 6, 2019, 7:48 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"On September 14, President Ghani signed a decree prohibiting employees and officials of security and judicial institutions, specifically the Supreme Court, Attorney General’s Office, Ministry of Interior, Ministry of Defense, and National Directorate of Security, from political party membership while government employees. Noncompliant employees could be fired" (19). "The constitution mandates parliamentary elections every five years, but the 2015 elections were delayed because of the government’s inability to agree on needed electoral reforms" (21). "In past elections male family members could vote on behalf of the women in their families" (23).
March 6, 2019, 9:58 a.m.
Countries: Belize
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"No laws limit participation of women… in the political process, and they did participate. Observers suggested cultural and societal constraints limited the number of women participating in government" (9-10).
Feb. 21, 2019, 8:18 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

""The problem is that 30% of women are illiterate in Egypt today," she explains. "They did not understand the process and many were told who to vote for. Besides, all the political alliances have an Islamic bias which is detrimental to the status of women."" (para 35).
Feb. 14, 2019, 10:48 p.m.
Countries: Belarus
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Citizens were unable to choose their government through free and fair elections. Since his election as president in 1994, Aliaksandr Lukashenka has consolidated his rule over all institutions and undermined the rule of law through authoritarian means, including manipulated elections and arbitrary decrees. All subsequent presidential elections fell well short of international standards. The 2016 parliamentary elections also failed to meet international standards" (1). Both women and men may be influenced to not vote because of a lack of legitimate elections (CEM - CODER COMMENT).
Feb. 1, 2019, 2:36 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Four in 10 (42%) women and 69% of men age 15-49 are literate" (33). A lack of literacy will keep many citizens from voting (CODER COMMENT - CEM).
Jan. 16, 2019, 3:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"There are concerns that a limited number of women observers would oversee the upcoming polls due to security, cultural restrictions and other reasons, something that could affect transparency and women’s participation in the democratic process. The Wolesi Jirga elections are scheduled for October 20. Insecurity, seen as major challenge for elections, is among reasons that would keep female observers from overseeing the elections" (Para 1-2). "Free and Fair Election Foundation of Afghanistan (FEFA) head, Yousuf Rashid, said he planned to have 9,500 observers including 35 percent of them women. But finding female election observers in districts and remote areas was a difficult job, he said. He said they faced problems...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"The western parts of Nepal are characterized by high illiteracy and poverty, low development and significant gender inequality" (para 8).
Dec. 14, 2018, 4:44 p.m.
Countries: Libya
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Ms. Bugaighis opposed the militias who aligned with political Islam, and also the ambitious general who declared a coup and went to war against them. By the spring of 2014, she and her family had left Benghazi after an assassination attempt nearly killed her son. But she risked returning home to cast her ballot in elections held that June and urged others to do the same" (7).
Dec. 14, 2018, 4:36 p.m.
Countries: Libya
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

“It is an undisputed fact that both man and woman are human beings,” Colonel Qaddafi wrote in the Green Book, his magnum opus of philosophical musings. He expanded women’s education, sharply reduced illiteracy among women, enabled women to enter new professions, and conspicuously included uniformed women in both the army and the police" (3) Women's illiteracy rates used to be drastically highter (AMG-CODER COMMENT).
Dec. 13, 2018, 3:44 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"While the Afghan population hail the peaceful completion of the electoral process, many Afghans are very unhappy that the negotiations on the framework of the National Unity Government had been kept under wraps, leaving us in a quandary over what kind of leadership we will deal with in the next five years" (3).
Oct. 25, 2018, 3:45 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Some families in remote areas of eastern Nangarhar province did not allow their female members to register as voters in the upcoming elections… There are also many families who allowed their women to register as voters in the upcoming parliamentary polls, but they are not permitted to vote for a candidate of their choice" (para 1-2). "Insecurity, lack of awareness programs by the Independent Election Commission (IEC) and cultural restrictions are said to be the main reasons that keep women from participating in elections in Nangarhar" (para 3). From paragraphs 5-13 there are several interviews that help show the reasons and circumstances around not allowing women to vote. Some, like...more
Oct. 11, 2018, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Pakistan only formally ended the de facto ban on women voting in October last year. Women have often remained unable to vote thanks to local and societal traditions and pressures" (para 4). "There have been some reports of locals attempting to prevent women from voting...men in Chakwal's Dharnal area turned women away, telling...: "It is un-Islamic for women to vote'" (para 6).
Sept. 26, 2018, 9:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"My friends know about the election, but they are not excited about it,” she recalled on an October afternoon from her office in a Jeddah PR company. “They didn’t register [to vote].'" (para 2). General apathy coming from women can be a response to the barriers women are confronted to when it comes to voting (CCS-CODER COMMENT). "But in Rana’s case, those things don’t include registering to vote. Rana ticked off the many obstacles she encountered. The window for registration was too brief, the documentation required too onerous, and her legal guardian — which all Saudi women require for even the most basic bureaucratic chores — wasn’t around to arrange...more
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:27 a.m.
Countries: Papua New Guinea
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"No law limits political participation by women, but the deeply rooted patriarchal culture impeded women’s full participation in political life. The political participation of women was often limited, since many were expected to vote along tribal and family lines" (12).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Discrimination was most common in rural areas where religious and cultural traditions, lack of education, and ignorance of the law remained severe impediments to the exercise of basic rights, such as the right to vote or to hold property in a woman’s name" (30).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-2

"On December 30, according to international press sources, UN international peacekeeping troops, including from Morocco, were listed as participants in sexually abusing young girls as they were queued to vote in elections in the Central African Republic. The Royal Armed Forces of Morocco opened a criminal investigation on the soldiers involved" (4).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Although they gained the right to vote in 2005, women faced cultural and social barriers to political participation. For example, some tribal leaders excluded women from tribal primaries" (19-20).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:15 a.m.
Countries: Greece
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"An unknown number of Roma were believed not to be registered to vote" (17). There are significant barriers facing the Roma people, and by extension their women, in terms of political activity and participation (AA-CODER COMMENT).
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

“Some states require that voters must show government-issued photo identification to vote, while others are more lenient and accept non-photo identification such as a bank statement with name and address. . . Low-income women (and men) who lack photo identification may face barriers like limited transportation and financial costs associated with accessing other identifying documents like birth certificates and marriage licenses; once time, travel, and the costs of documents are factored in, the cost associated with a ‘free ID card’ can range from $75 to $175; when legal fees are included, the costs can be as high as $1,500” (8)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

“women are more likely to be prevented from voting by laws that require them to show multiple forms of identification with the same name—such as a driver’s license and birth certificate—since women who marry and divorce often change their names. . . A national survey sponsored by the Brennan Center for Justice in 2006 found that more than half of women with access to a birth certificate did not have one that reflected their current name, and only 66 percent of women with access to any proof of citizenship had documents reflecting their current name” (8)