The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for WAM-DATA-2

Sept. 19, 2017, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Venezuela
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"The shortage of traditional contraceptive methods like condoms has also fueled the rise in sterilization.Damarys Ramos, a gynecologist who works in Caracas, said Venezuelans often are limited to whatever contraception is available in stores or markets at the moment. More often than not, birth control can be found only on the black market — and at very high prices. Venezuelan women are hashtagging 'contraceptive method' on Instagram to find the illegal sellers and buy the products, explained Ramos. Abache, the PLAFAM director, said some black-market vendors are selling fake contraceptive methods"(para 8-9)
Sept. 15, 2017, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Australia
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1, WAM-DATA-2

The photograph shows Linda Burney's [the first indigenous woman elected to the Australian House of Representatives] twitter posts about beginning her term (ENB-Coder Comment)
Jan. 31, 2017, 11:39 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"At village level, many are more bothered about women using mobile phones at all than they are about men using them to intimidate rape victims or to share videos of sexual assaults. A number of local councils in Uttar Pradesh, concerned with what they see as technology's corrupting effect on traditional moral values, have prohibited girls from owning mobile phones. 'There is so much pressure on girls, and if by any chance they do lay their hands on a phone or use ear phones to listen to music, then they are branded 'characterless''" (para 18-20).
Nov. 30, 2016, 8:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"In the area of information, the Demographic and Health Survey of 2006 indicates that nearly 25 per cent of women have no access to any of the media, compared to 31 per cent for rural women; the extension of national coverage by the creation of new entities (233 radio stations in 2008 compared to 178 in 2006) has improved the rate. Several local radio broadcasters, including rural stations, have arisen in the country" (41).
Nov. 11, 2016, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"In the middle of telling her story, [Peninnah]Tombo's cheap cellphone buzzes. It's a 14-year-old girl named Joyce. Her father's cattle died in a drought, Joyce says, and he has decided to marry her off so that he can replace his stock. Joyce instead ran off to an aunt's house and has phoned Tombo for help"(para 9)
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:08 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“About one-third of women and men have no regular exposure to any mass media” (31). “Men and women age 15-49 are about equally likely to be regularly exposed to any and all forms of media, including newspapers, television, and radio (Figure 3.2). Radio is the most common form of media exposure for both women and men across all subgroups. About one-third of women and men are not regularly exposed to any form of media” (33). “The proportion of people who are not regularly exposed to any mass media has increased slightly since 2009, from 29% to 32% among women and from 33% to 36% among men” (33). “Rural women are ...more
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Fifty-three percent of household members age 13 and older own a mobile phone; ownership is 64 percent in urban and 48 percent in rural areas. Forty-five percent of adolescents (age p15-19) own a mobile phone; male adolescents are twice as likely as female adolescents to own a mobile phone (63 percent versus 31 percent)” (9). “Table 2.17 shows that 53 percent of the population owns a mobile phone. Urban people are more likely to own a mobile phone (64 percent) than rural people (48 percent). Men are almost twice as likely as women to own a mobile phone” (27). “In urban areas, 78 percent of men own a mobile phone ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 4:05 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Nine percent of women read a newspaper, 35 percent watch television, and 39 percent listen to the radio at least once a week. Only 7 percent of women have access to all three media at least once a week, and half do not have access to any of the three media at least once a week” (39). “The proportion of urban women who read a newspaper at least once a week is 15 percent, as compared with 5 percent among rural women. Urban women are much more likely than rural women to watch television once a week (55 percent versus 21 percent). Across states, women who reside in Abia are ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Radio is the most widely accessed mass media, with 81 percent of women and 83 percent of men listening to the radio at least once a week” (32). “Newspaper reading and television watching at least once a week by men is almost equal (52 percent and 51 percent, respectively), while for women the corresponding percentages are 49 percent for newspapers and 45 percent for television” (32). “Only 11 percent of women and 11 percent of men are not exposed to any of these media on a weekly basis” (32). “Eight in ten women (83 percent) in the highest wealth quintile read a newspaper at least once a week, compared with ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:44 p.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Men are more likely to have access to the media than women; 13 percent of men are exposed to all three media at least once a week compared with only 5 percent of women” (31). “Thirty-one percent of women and 14 percent of men age 15-49 are not exposed to any media” (31). “The data show that 52 percent of women and 78 percent of men age 15-49 listen to the radio at least once a week, and 51 percent of women and 66 percent of men watch television at least once a week. Exposure to print media is much less common; 9 percent of women and 17 percent of ...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 1:57 p.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Men are more likely to have access to the media than women; 13 percent of men are exposed to all three media at least once a week compared with only 5 percent of women” (31). “Thirty-one percent of women and 14 percent of men age 15-49 are not exposed to any media” (31). “The data show that 52 percent of women and 78 percent of men age 15-49 listen to the radio at least once a week, and 51 percent of women and 66 percent of men watch television at least once a week. Exposure to print media is much less common; 9 percent of women and 17 percent of ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:53 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Radio is the most widely accessed mass media, with 81 percent of women and 83 percent of men listening to the radio at least once a week” (32). “Newspaper reading and television watching at least once a week by men is almost equal (52 percent and 51 percent, respectively), while for women the corresponding percentages are 49 percent for newspapers and 45 percent for television” (32). “Only 11 percent of women and 11 percent of men are not exposed to any of these media on a weekly basis” (32). “Eight in ten women (83 percent) in the highest wealth quintile read a newspaper at least once a week, compared with ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:52 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Radio is the most widely accessed mass media, with 81 percent of women and 83 percent of men listening to the radio at least once a week” (32). “Newspaper reading and television watching at least once a week by men is almost equal (52 percent and 51 percent, respectively), while for women the corresponding percentages are 49 percent for newspapers and 45 percent for television” (32). “Only 11 percent of women and 11 percent of men are not exposed to any of these media on a weekly basis” (32). “Eight in ten women (83 percent) in the highest wealth quintile read a newspaper at least once a week, compared with ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:50 a.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Twenty-three percent of women and 10 percent of men are not exposed to any source of mass media” (xxi). “Twenty-three percent of women and 10 percent of men are not exposed to any source of mass media” (31). “Women are less likely than men to have access to mass media; this is true for all types of media” (44). “Radio is the most popular medium for both women and men (accessed at least weekly by 70 percent of women and 86 percent of men), while newspapers are the least popular medium (accessed at least weekly by 18 percent of women and 41 percent of men). Only 11 percent of women ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:49 a.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Men are more likely to have access to the media than women; 13 percent of men are exposed to all three media at least once a week compared with only 5 percent of women” (31). “Thirty-one percent of women and 14 percent of men age 15-49 are not exposed to any media” (31). “The data show that 52 percent of women and 78 percent of men age 15-49 listen to the radio at least once a week, and 51 percent of women and 66 percent of men watch television at least once a week. Exposure to print media is much less common; 9 percent of women and 17 percent of ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:46 a.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“The most popular mass media is radio broadcast, with 75 percent of women and 83 percent of men listening to the radio at least once a week. The next most accessed media is newspaper, with 52 percent of women and 61 percent of men reading a newspaper at least once a week. Thirty-eight percent of women and 45 percent of men watch television at least once a week” (35). “Overall, only 23 percent of women and 31 percent of men have access to all three types of media. Further, 14 percent of women and 7 percent of men have no contact with any media at any time of the week” ...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:45 a.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Three in ten women check email or surf the internet at least once a week. Younger women access the internet more than older women” (19).
July 27, 2016, 10:06 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Forty-nine percent of women and 22 percent of men are not regularly exposed to any media source” (29). “Table 3.4.1 shows that 48 percent of ever-married women age 15-49 watch television at least once a week, 6 percent read a newspaper at least once a week, and 5 percent listen to the radio at least once a week. Less than 1 percent of women are exposed to all three media sources each week. Close to half (49 percent) of women have no exposure to any of the mass media on a weekly basis. The proportion of women listening to the radio every week has decreased markedly over the years, dropping ...more
July 27, 2016, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

“Fifty-six percent of women and 43 percent of men do not have weekly access to newspapers, television, or a radio” (33). “Seven percent of women and 14 percent of men read newspapers at least once a week, 14 percent of women and 18 percent of men watch television at least once a week, and 40 percent of women and 54 percent of men listen to the radio at least once a week. Overall, only 4 percent of women and 9 percent of men are exposed to all three media at least once per week. More than half of women (56 percent) and more than four of every ten men (43 ...more
July 4, 2016, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: Argentina
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"38.7% of young rural women and 35% of young rural men claim to use a computer, denoting a difference of 10% in favour of women. Although at lower levels (31.4% and 28.5% for young women and men, respectively) in sparsely populated rural zones, the gap also favours women by 10%. It should be noted that the Conectar Igualdad programme has both urban and rural coverage in secondary schools and agricultural technical schools" (36).
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"Among these, in nine low Internet penetration countries or areas – Azerbaijan, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Occupied Palestinian Territory, Panama, Paraguay and Turkey – less than 25 per cent of women use the Internet...On the other hand, the gender gap is less pronounced or non-existent in a number of countries from both more and less developed economies. It is less than 5 percentage points in the low Internet penetration countries of Bulgaria, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Poland, Romania and Uruguay as well as in the relatively high Internet penetration countries of Australia, Canada, Estonia, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, New Zealand, ...more
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Cuba
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"In all these countries a higher proportion of men than women use the Internet, except in Cuba where the gender disparity is in favour of women" (72).
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Estonia, France, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Uruguay
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"On the other hand, the gender gap is less pronounced or non-existent in a number of countries from both more and less developed economies. It is less than 5 percentage points in the low Internet penetration countries of Bulgaria, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Poland, Romania and Uruguay as well as in the relatively high Internet penetration countries of Australia, Canada, Estonia, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, New Zealand, Slovenia and the United States of America" (72).
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Austria, China, Germany, Japan, South Korea, Switzerland
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"Substantial gender gaps ranging from 10 to 22 percentage points are also present in the following relatively high Internet penetration countries/areas: Austria; China, Hong Kong SAR; Germany; Japan; Luxembourg; the Republic of Korea and Switzerland" (72).
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Greece, Italy, Macedonia, Serbia, Sri Lanka
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"In the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Italy, the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Serbia and Sri Lanka – all with low Internet penetration – the gender gaps in favour of men range from 10 to 13 percentage points" (72).
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan, Turkey
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"Among these, in nine low Internet penetration countries or areas – Azerbaijan, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Occupied Palestinian Territory, Panama, Paraguay and Turkey – less than 25 per cent of women use the Internet" (72).
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"Among these, in nine low Internet penetration countries or areas – Azerbaijan, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Occupied Palestinian Territory, Panama, Paraguay and Turkey – less than 25 per cent of women use the Internet...In the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Italy, the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Serbia and Sri Lanka – all with low Internet penetration – the gender gaps in favour of men range from 10 to 13 percentage points" (72).
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Finland, Iceland
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"In contrast, the proportion of women who use the Internet is larger than 75 per cent in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway and Sweden, all high Internet penetration countries...On the other hand, the gender gap is less pronounced or non-existent in a number of countries from both more and less developed economies. It is less than 5 percentage points in the low Internet penetration countries of Bulgaria, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Poland, Romania and Uruguay as well as in the relatively high Internet penetration countries of Australia, Canada, Estonia, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, New Zealand, Slovenia and the United States of America" ...more
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"In contrast, the proportion of women who use the Internet is larger than 75 per cent in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway and Sweden, all high Internet penetration countries" (72).
May 25, 2016, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, New Zealand, Slovenia, United States
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"On the other hand, the gender gap is less pronounced or non-existent in a number of countries from both more and less developed economies. It is less than 5 percentage points in the low Internet penetration countries of Bulgaria, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Poland, Romania and Uruguay as well as in the relatively high Internet penetration countries of Australia, Canada, Estonia, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, New Zealand, Slovenia and the United States of America" (72).