The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for WR-LAW-1

Oct. 26, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"In 2008, in recognition of the large number of war widows and popular aversion to widow remarriage, the government put forward a scheme to pay men a 50,000 rupee ($460) incentive to marry widows.But widows protested, saying the proposal was open to abuse by traffickers and would turn them into commodities. Nepal’s Supreme Court ordered the government to ditch the initiative"(para 22-23)."[Lily] Thapa says several discriminatory laws and policies have been amended in recent years. For example, a widow who remarries no longer needs to return her deceased husband’s property"(para 27)
Aug. 30, 2016, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"Article 373. A widow shall not remarry before a period of four months and ten days after the death of her husband. A pregnant widow can only remarry after childbirth. If the birth occurs during this time, it is no longer required to complete the period prescribed in the previous paragraph" (para 5-6)
June 7, 2016, 8:39 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"In a separate decision on Wednesday that was more heartening for women’s rights campaigners, the Supreme Court struck down a rule requiring divorced women to wait at least 150 days before remarrying. The rule is intended to prevent confusion over paternity in cases in which the divorcing woman is pregnant, but critics called it outdated and sexist. The court did not reject the basic principle of a waiting period, however, but merely demanded a shorter time frame, saying that anything over 100 days was an unconstitutional burden" (para 14-15). Note: This is for divorced women, not necessarily widows (ORR-CODER COMMENT)
March 29, 2016, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: East Timor
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"The Civil Code contains a provision on the period of time to be awaited to re-enter in a marriage after divorce or death of a spouse (inter-nuptial time) of 180 days for men and 300 days for women (Art. 1494). The law allows woman to marry after 180 days if she obtains “judicial declaration ascertaining that she is not pregnant or if she does not have a child after dissolution, declaration of nullity or annulment of previous marriage” (Art. 1494-2). This difference in inter-nuptial time for men and women may derive from social dogma in terms of widowhood, as the law imposes ‘official mourning’ between the dissolution of the previous ...more
Feb. 29, 2016, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: WR-LAW-1

""There are no laws regarding widow remarriage. The women can make their own choices." Anna Cheburei" (12)
Jan. 6, 2016, 10:42 p.m.
Countries: Benin
Variables: WR-LAW-1, IW-LAW-1

"Act No. 2002-07 of 24 August 2004 on the Personal and Family Code lays down egalitarian principles in accordance with the Constitution and thus significantly combats discrimination. For example, it abolishes marriage by levirate (art. 122)" (5). Marriage by levirate refers to the type of marriage in which the brother of the deceased man is obliged to marry his brother's widow and the widow is required to marry her deceased husband's brother (HLH-CODER COMMENT)
Aug. 25, 2015, 11:59 p.m.
Countries: Dominican Republic
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"A consensus-based draft reform was prepared and promoted by the Ministry of Women and the Women’s Forum for Constitutional Reform. Preparations are now being made to analyse and review this proposal in accordance with the new Constitution of the Republic, since the latter text strengthens and broadens expectations with regard to the most relevant aspects, such as the responsibility of parents to provide their sons and daughters with an education and prepare them for the future; it also provides that gender-based physical, psychological, sexual or economic acts of violence committed by one spouse against another are causes for dissolving a marriage that are not subject to appeal and constitute a ...more
May 29, 2015, 7:24 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"The [CEDAW] Committee further notes the lack of a civil code for family matters" (11)
Dec. 26, 2014, 3:01 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"It is a well-known fact that the perpetrators of abuses such as denial of rights to inheritance, land, property, custody of children, forced remarriage (for example, in breach of the levirate law, Sec 77 (2) of the Civil Status Registration Ordinance, 1981,) coercive degrading and harmful HTPs include, not just rural people where traditional attitudes are deeply ingrained and knowledge of modern laws is poor, but also many high-status important male figures in government, and in the military. This is intolerable. These men should be role models, and not perpetuators of discriminatory and abusive attitudes to women, girls and especially widows!" (Para 7). "According to Paragraph 31 of the periodic ...more
Nov. 13, 2014, 9:37 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"Umm Amana belongs to the fundamentalist Salafi community in Tunisia, so it’s no wonder she opposes the laws for gender equality, passed back in 1956 right after Tunisia declared its independence. These laws, which are the most progressive in the Arab world, are perceived by orthodox Muslim women, and Salafists in particular, as detrimental to their faith and way of life. These laws deal with women’s status, forbidding polygamy and giving women full control over their children in the event of their husbands’ death. The minimum age for marriage is set at 17, and requires the woman’s consent. In 1981 another law was passed, forbidding women to cover their heads ...more
July 11, 2012, 8:56 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"For example, Art. 9 of the Law on Marriage and Family states that 'After the dissolution of marriage a woman may remarry. However, she shall remain in a legal state of marriage until at least 120 days after the death of husband or 120 days after the judgment which grants a final divorce.' Since the last Shadow Report of 2005, the law has reduced the number of days from 300 to 120, but discrimination against women is still present in the document" (9-10)
Nov. 4, 2011, 1:54 p.m.
Countries: Cote D'Ivoire
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"Other cases of societal violence against women included FGM, dowry deaths, levirat (forcing a widow to marry her dead husband's brother), and sororat (forcing a woman to marry her dead sister's husband)"(Section 6).
June 7, 2011, 3:57 p.m.
Countries: Equatorial Guinea
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"The Committee is concerned about the persistence of deep-rooted adverse cultural norms, customs and traditions, including forced and early marriage, widowhood practices, levirate and the use of the dowry, as well as the prevalence of stereotypes that discriminate against women and constitute serious obstacles to women's enjoyment of their human rights. The Committee is concerned about the State party's limited efforts to directly address such discriminatory cultural practices and stereotypes and its position that women themselves are primarily responsible for changing their position of disadvantage" (4)
Feb. 24, 2011, 8:02 a.m.
Countries: Equatorial Guinea
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"More information was asked in connection with the laws governing marriage and divorce, the administration of property, the sharing of parental responsibilities, the situation of de facto union, children born out of wedlock and the disposal of property in case of the dissolution of marriage. More information was requested in connection with the social status of divorced women and widows, and their children" (3)
Feb. 8, 2011, 2:36 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"It's a practice that became less common in the 20th Century, but politicians put forward a proposal last year to offer married men financial incentives to take on a second wife" (par. 8). Reason for second wife is the huge number of widows in Iraq now (RFZ CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 19, 2011, 3:59 p.m.
Countries: Angola
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"Family Code, Law No. 1 adopted February 20, 1988, Art 75 paragraph 1: the surviving spouse has the right to enjoy the benefits of marriage" (Section: LEGISLATIVE MECHANISMS OF INHERITANCE / SUCCESSION)
Dec. 3, 2010, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Zambia
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"Section 9 of the Act, which deals with the house of the deceased as part of his estate, doesnÕt take into account that this house might have been a matrimonial home, to which the wife contributed. The home is seen as the deceased husbandÕs estate, as it was registered in his name, so the widow only gets a life interest _ that is, she can live there until she dies or remarries _ which she has to share in case her husband had more wives. In contrast, a male surviving spouse could remain in the house, even if he remarries." (Section: National Legal frame)"In patrilineal and patrilocal groups in the ...more
Dec. 3, 2010, 3:56 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"In general, women do not inherit land if there is a male offspring and widows lose their right to inheritance if they remarry outside the family of the deceased husband. " (Section: Customary Law)
Nov. 4, 2010, 6:17 p.m.
Countries: Burkina Faso
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"Widowhood profoundly changes the status of women in Burkina Faso and undermines their security. Customary laws deny women and widows the right to inherit land and assets. Widows can be inherited by their deceased husband's brother and must abide by these laws or risk being ostracised and left without income and assets at a time of trauma and bereavement" (4)
Nov. 3, 2010, 7:57 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"According to customary norms, sons protect women, especially widows and the elderly. Moreover, according to the levirate custom, widows can continue to have access to cash income and land benefits by marrying their brother-in-law" (Section: Customary Law). "INHERITANCE/SUCCESSION DE FACTO PRACTICES: Under customary law, men have direct inheritance rights to land and housing property while women do not. As a matter of fact, women's access to land use and benefits is dependent upon kinship or marriage. - Although the statutory law states that spouses are equally fourth in line for inheritance, in practice, upon dissolution of marriage women lose all access to land and natural resources and, traditionally, even custody ...more
Nov. 3, 2010, 7:54 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"In some instances, through the practice of female husband, widows can safeguard their interests in their husband's land by marrying a woman who then provides labour and also children, who are born in the name of the deceased husband" (Section: Customary Law)
Nov. 2, 2010, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"The provisions on inheritance in Islamic law give some protection to woman's inheritance rights. Under the Sharia legal system, widows are allowed an in-house compulsory mourning period of four months and 10 days to determine whether they are pregnant for the deceased husband. After that period, if they are found not to be pregnant, they are free to remarry. Widows under the Sharia law inherit their husbands' properties together with their children. However, women only have the right to inherit a small share" (Section: Customary Law)
Oct. 14, 2010, 1:34 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: SMES-DATA-2, MARR-PRACTICE-2, WR-LAW-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-2, ATDW-PRACTICE-3, ATDW-LAW-1, ATDW-LAW-3, ATDW-LAW-4, ATDW-LAW-5, ADCM-PRACTICE-1, ADCM-LAW-1, DSFMF-PRACTICE-3, DSFMF-LAW-1

"Prior the PSC, women could not initiate divorce. Generally, the Ulemas (experts in Islamic Law) did not completely deny women this right and in theory, a woman could call upon the Qadi to put an end to the conjugal bond. However, Islamic law required so many conditions and such high standards of evidence that it was difficult in practice for a woman to establish her case. The Qadi, who personified male patriarchal privilege, often portrayed prejudice against women. Legal procedures initiated by women dragged on for years and were only concluded in very rare cases, asserts Mohamed Charfi in his foreword to the AFTURD Guide on Divorce. (Le Divorce). For ...more
Sept. 28, 2010, 11:53 a.m.
Countries: Somalia
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"Xeer is the set of rules and obligations developed among traditional elders to mediate peaceful relations between competitive clans and subclans. Although there are certain differences, the most significant principles of xeer, many of which affect women, are common across all clans. These include the following: i. collective payment of diya, blood compensation, usually paid with camels and other livestock, for death, physical harm, theft, rape, and defamation and to provide assistance to relatives; ii. maintaining interclan harmony by sparing the lives of socially-respected groups, birimageydo, including the elderly, the religious, women, children, poets and guests, entering into negotiations with 'peace emissaries' in good faith and treating women fairly without ...more
Sept. 28, 2010, 11:28 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"For a widow, the case is similar to that of the divorcee, but more severe. Cleansing is a cultural practice consisting in denying the widow the right to remarry in order to make sure that the property and children remain in her husband's family name. In rural areas, women often marry the brother of the late husband so to keep the property in his family" (para 42)
Sept. 24, 2010, 2:07 p.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: WR-LAW-1

There is no law regulating the marriage of a widow to her deceasedÕs husbandÕs brother. There is however the Marriage with Deceased WifeÕs Sister Act, Ch. 122 which declares that where a man has, whether before or after the passing of this Act, and whether in the Bahamas or elsewhere, married his deceasedÕs wifeÕs sister the marriage, if legal in all other respects, shall be, and shall be deemed always to have been, legal for all purposes, unless either party to the marriage has subsequently, during the life of the other, but before the passing of this Act, lawfully married another.Ó (122,123)
Aug. 25, 2010, 4:03 p.m.
Countries: Burkina Faso
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"The levirate marriage is expressly prohibited by statute as provided by Article 234 of the Code of Persons and the Family" (Inheritance/succession de facto practices).
Aug. 25, 2010, 3:14 p.m.
Countries: Angola
Variables: WR-LAW-1

Family Code, Law No. 1 adopted February 20, 1988, Art 75 paragraph 1: the surviving spouse has the right to enjoy the benefits of marriage" (LEGISLATIVE MECHANISMS OF INHERITANCE / SUCCESSION).
April 6, 2010, 5:20 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: WR-LAW-1

"Religious marriage: If the wedding took place in Lebanon, the marriage falls under the family law of the community in which the marriage was concluded. In all Eastern Catholic communities, marriage is governed, in matters such as contract, obligations, validity, annulment, and dissolution of marital links, by the law on the sacrament of marriage of the Eastern Catholic Church, enforced since February 22nd, 1949 by apostolic decision and scheduled to the law of April 2nd, 1951" (17)
Jan. 4, 2010, 11:57 a.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: WR-LAW-1

In regards to Bahamas Marriage laws: “Divorcees/Widows/Widowers: Certified copies of final divorce decrees and certified copies of death certificates must be attached to the application if necessary” (Para. 3).