The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for WR-PRACTICE-1

Oct. 30, 2017, 3:24 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Customary marriage in Egypt does not only affect girls. Women, widows and divorcees are also married this way through offices set up specifically to introduce them to potential husbands. Amira Hassan, the manager of Al-Hayat Company for Social Harmony, a matchmaking company, said this type of marriage is very common due to the prevailing social conditions and the requirements of an official marriage, such as paying an officiant, the Ministry of Religious Endowments and the relevant state authorities, namely the Ministry of Justice, as well as paying expenses related to supporting the wife. 'Unofficial marriage contracts only require the consent of both parties, without adding other conditions,' she said" (para ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"When a woman in Nepal loses her husband, she often wears white clothes. The culture also requires widows to shun merriment and live in virtual seclusion"(para 1)."Often forced into virtual seclusion , they [widows] are not supposed to remarry or move out of their in-laws’ homes, which leaves many open to exploitation"(para 20)."In 2008, in recognition of the large number of war widows and popular aversion to widow remarriage, the government put forward a scheme to pay men a 50,000 rupee ($460) incentive to marry widows.But widows protested, saying the proposal was open to abuse by traffickers and would turn them into commodities. Nepal’s Supreme Court ordered the government to ...more
Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Three years [after the death of her husband], she met Mohammad Ali. 'He asked to marry me and said he would take care of my children'" (para 16).
June 8, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-3

"Wesal [it means communion or reunion in Arabic — a first-of-its-kind matchmaking website in Gaza] not only facilitates marriages for widows, but also for the divorced and those who have never married" (p 15)
June 8, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-2

"on Wesal — it means communion or reunion in Arabic — a first-of-its-kind matchmaking website in Gaza. It has been successful, and not just because Tinder and other dating apps are banned or severely frowned on here. Its founder knows his demographic well: residents of the religiously conservative Gaza Strip, with its culture of resistance. Some 1,400 men have been killed in the three wars with Israel since 2008, leaving many widows who would like to remarry. Tradition, however, can make it difficult for them to wed single men" (p 5-6)
June 8, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"‘Women who lost their men during the last three wars have difficult lives and few options,’ said Reham Owda, a Gaza-based writer and analyst of women’s issues. ‘In most cases the husband’s family pressures the woman to marry the brother in law to control her life and seize any financial aid she receives.’ Ms. Owda added that if the widow’s husband is affiliated with a political party, it might intervene and pressure the woman to marry a man from the same group, and she will often agree because she is struggling financially and the group will pay her a salary" (p 12-13)
June 6, 2017, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Aruna Kanthi Athauda was married to a soldier in the Sri Lankan army. Since his death, she receives a monthly pension. Aruna lives on a compound with her husband’s family. Many widows like her won’t remarry, because they would lose half the money they receive" (1). This is a quote from the narrator at 11:25 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "'Often in remarriages you inherit your new husband’s children and it causes your own children to think they will be forgotten. I don’t want to put my children in that situation. That’s why I will never remarry'" (1). This is a quote from a war widow at 12:42 (TPJ - CODER ...more
March 28, 2017, 1:47 p.m.
Countries: Guinea-Bissau
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, IW-PRACTICE-1

"Widows are required to marry the brothers of their late husbands so that they can remain in the same household group and ensure that their chil-dren are being provided for" (526).
Feb. 9, 2017, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, IW-PRACTICE-1

"When Clarisse's husband died of malaria last year in the Cameroonian city of Douala, she was kicked out of their home by his family and forced to marry his brother" (para 1).
Nov. 22, 2016, 12:37 p.m.
Countries: Benin
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, IW-PRACTICE-1

"Forced marriage and widowhood rites such as forcing the widow to lie beside the dead body of the deceased and to marry the deceased husband’s brother (levirate) occurred in certain regions" (16).
Nov. 16, 2016, 1:51 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Despite widowhood, Vinita made up her mind to forge on, raising a foster child by herself"(para 6).Two other widows mentioned in the article, Jayamma and Jyoti, also seem to have not re-married (ENB-Coder Comment)."If Jyoti, a Hindu, had to fight stringent traditions to live on her own terms, Sabeha’s experiences have not been too different. Sabeha, a tailor, sees how sexism and patriarchal notions prevalent among some Islamic clerics and men in the community compel Muslim widows to follow in their Hindu sisters’ footsteps, even though it is not mandated in their religion. 'Islam only prescribes "iddat," a three-month period of mourning for widows, and even that is not mandatory ...more
April 26, 2016, 2:17 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

“Widowhood also increases with age among men, but not to the same extent as among women. Only 2 percent of men age 45-49 are widowed, as compared with 11 percent of women. This is likely due to men’s greater propensity to remarry after having been widowed” (98).
March 29, 2016, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: East Timor
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Following Timor-Leste’s customary practices, the usual period to be awaited by a woman or man before re-marriage after the death of a spouse is one year (at least 360 days). After all the ceremonies (lisan for death and funeral) are completed by both the groom’s family (fetosan) and the bride’s family (umane), it marks the end of the mourning and he/she is granted the right to begin a new life. Another common customary practice after the death of a spouse and not covered or addressed by the Civil Code, is the forced remarriage of the widow/widower with either the brother or sister in-laws of the deceased spouse" (77)more
Feb. 29, 2016, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

""In Ukraine, everyone can marry and divorce freely, as they wish. Widows are encouraged to remarry by society so that life will be easier, but women have a choice. We have many widows now because of the war in the East." Anna Cheburei" (12)
Jan. 20, 2016, 8:29 a.m.
Countries: Guinea-Bissau
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-2, IW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-LAW-1

"Traditions and customary laws also greatly influence family structures. In some ethnic groups customary laws do not allow women from inheriting property, which is rather passed on to a male heir. Similarly, some groups practice widow inheritance, forcing the widowed women to marry a male relative of the deceased husband" (12).
Sept. 19, 2015, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-2, PW-PRACTICE-2

"...soldier Hassan Jassem is not even 30 years old but already married to a second wife. He told Al-Monitor, 'There is full harmony between my two wives and they live with my mother under the same roof.' Jassem said, 'I got married for the second time to a widow who is my friend’s sister, to save her from staying alone with no husband and especially since she did not have children from her first marriage. We are now expecting our first child'" (p 9-10)
Sept. 5, 2015, 10:14 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Indian men in a drought-stricken village are marrying multiple women in order to fetch drinking water for their household...Some of the women in the village are happy to be taken as ‘water wives’ because they were widowed or abandoned" (p 1, 4)
Aug. 18, 2015, 10:52 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"The wrong interpretations from Sharia and imposing it on women in most parts of the country has resulted in polygamy without considering the legal requirements, force marriage of under-age girls and force marriage of widows with the family members of their deceased husband" (21)
Aug. 18, 2015, 10:46 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-1

"It [the Committee] is deeply concerned at the persistence of adverse cultural norms, practices and traditions which are harmful to women such as child marriage, baad (settlement of disputes by giving away girls), badal (exchange marriages), and forced marriages, including forced marriages of widows" (6)
July 14, 2015, 11:03 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-1

"It is deeply concerned at the persistence of adverse cultural norms, practices and traditions which are harmful to women, such as child marriage, baad (settlement of disputes by giving away girls), badal (exchange marriages) and forced marriages, including forced marriages of widows" (page 6).
June 25, 2015, 3:49 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Widows are allowed to marry someone else. Very rigid, conservative families keep the tradition that a woman should marry the deceased husband’s brother"
April 15, 2015, 8:04 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

In mid-October, news on the wave of horrific acid attacks on women was published in the media. The first round of barbaric attacks was carried out against 6 women in Isfahan. All were hospitalized in this city’s Feiz Hospital. One of the victims, a 21-year old woman who had acid thrown to her face, entered her mouth, burning her internal organs. Eyewitnesses said the common characteristic of all the victims were women who were young, beautiful and did not dress in chador (5). "Hoodlums linked to the regime splashed acid on another woman and easily left the scene in Isfahan’s Apadna region. The mullahs’ MOIS agents carried the body of ...more
April 3, 2015, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Following a divorce or the death of the husband, a woman must observe 'Idda, a period of up to 4 months during which time she cannot remarry and must respect specific rules (art. 58 - 61). For example, she can be forbidden from leaving the family home. Certain categories of women are prevented from remarrying for a longer period of time ('temporarily prohibited women', art. 30)" (para 36)
Jan. 3, 2015, 2:12 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Past research revealed that around 90% of the estimated 10,000 Kashmiri war widows didn’t remarry despite provision of remarriage in Islam" (para. 5)
Jan. 3, 2015, 10:12 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Not only are they looked upon with scorn, but they are also considered to be persons who could lure away the husbands from families in the areas where they live. Consequently many keeps a watchful eye on her husband when in the company of widows. To cap it all, our culture does not permit a widow to re-marry without a hassle. In view of all these cultural barriers, these widows are bound to live a life of misery" (7). "Forced Marrige and Prostitution are becoming common among the Tamil Widows.Two state supported Tamil paramilitary groups (EPDP and Karuna Group) are invoved in forcing young girls to be taken to the ...more
Dec. 26, 2014, 3:01 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"It is a well-known fact that the perpetrators of abuses such as denial of rights to inheritance, land, property, custody of children, forced remarriage (for example, in breach of the levirate law, Sec 77 (2) of the Civil Status Registration Ordinance, 1981,) coercive degrading and harmful HTPs include, not just rural people where traditional attitudes are deeply ingrained and knowledge of modern laws is poor, but also many high-status important male figures in government, and in the military. This is intolerable. These men should be role models, and not perpetuators of discriminatory and abusive attitudes to women, girls and especially widows!" (Para 7). "According to Paragraph 31 of the periodic ...more
Dec. 23, 2014, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Only a small fraction of half widows choose to remarry. Many half widows do not contemplate re-marriage believing that they will eventually receive some information about their husbands. Other widows give up the option of remarriage on account of their children as there is a deeply held fear that a stepfather will never accept his wife's children or give them his best. For those women who want to remarry unfortunately the social stigmas around remarriage in Kashmiri society remain strong while religious interpretations of the rules around remarriage, when a person has disappeared remain contested through various cultural lenses" (para. 8)
Dec. 4, 2014, 10:59 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Jamuna Devi became a bride at the age of nine and a widow at 18. Now at 80-plus, she has spent the last 60 years of her life by the banks of River Ganga in Varanasi, the ancient seat of Hinduism in Uttar Pradesh" (para. 1). Coder Comment: it can be reasonably assumed that widows are generally considered unmarriagable in this region, as many are compelled to live out the rest of their lives in communities of widows PKB
Nov. 6, 2014, 2:39 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

" Ms Aarati Saxena of Delhi University raised an interesting point about older women living in Vrindavan and Varanasi, renowned sacred places in India. Women mostly from West Bengal were once sent to such places when widowed. Now it seems unacceptable for a woman to have to give up everything because they’ve lost their husband. Ms Aarati asked me if this was the same in Bangladesh since once both Bengals shared common culture before partition of Indian sub-continent. Suddenly this question struck me and I started to think about older widows in my home country" (para. 3-4)
Oct. 1, 2014, 10:01 a.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"For many of the men, dependency on handouts is intolerable, so they refuse to seek help or collect the supplies. Women have to get the supplies. But for more conservative families, the public exposure of women is a challenge too. This is causing trauma and domestic violence. For widows it is particularly difficult and, anecdotally, some are opting to marry as the second wife to get male protection. But this is creating new societal problems. Some women household heads and widows may go for days without food because they do not feel comfortable and don’t have the skills to negotiate assistance" (para. 13).