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Latest items for Kyrgyzstan

Sept. 13, 2021, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan, Belgium, Benin, D R Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Luxembourg, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Namibia, Nepal, Rwanda, Senegal, South Korea, South Sudan, Taiwan, Turkmenistan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
Variables: LRW-SCALE-12

0.0
July 16, 2021, 12:22 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Bride kidnapping, known locally as Ala Kachuu, has roots in the Central Asian country's nomadic past and persisted into the Soviet era, albeit on a smaller scale. The practice involves a potential groom forcibly taking a young woman or girl back to his home before pressuring her to agree to marriage by writing a letter of consent" (Para 14-15). "The last time a bride kidnapping death brought protesters onto the streets in Kyrgyzstan was in 2018, when 20-year-old medical student Burulai Turdaaly Kyzy was killed in a police station where officers had held her with her kidnapper as she prepared to file a statement against him" (Para 24). "According to...more
July 16, 2021, 12:22 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"This is the horrifying moment a young woman was ambushed by three men on her way home from work and shoved into a car in Kyrgyzstan - hours before she was found murdered in a case of 'bride kidnapping. Security camera footage shows Aizada Kanatbekova, 27, being surrounded by the trio before they grab her and push her into the back of a red Honda Civic in the capital Bishkek on Monday so that she could be forcibly married'" (Para 1-2). "The last time a bride kidnapping death brought protesters onto the streets in Kyrgyzstan was in 2018, when 20-year-old medical student Burulai Turdaaly Kyzy was killed in a police...more
July 16, 2021, 12:22 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: MARR-LAW-1

"[Bride kidnapping] was outlawed in 2013 but convictions are extremely rare and survivors are reluctant to file complaints due to threats of violence and cultural stigma" (Para 17).
July 16, 2021, 12:22 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: MURDER-DATA-1

"Police said Wednesday Karantbekova's body was found strangled in the back of the car outside of the capital and she had been abducted for marriage in a case of 'bride kidnapping'. Kanatbekova's kidnapper and assumed murderer, believed to be a 36-year-old man, was also found dead, police said, adding that they believe he committed suicide" (Para 6-7).
July 16, 2021, 12:22 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Kanatbekova's abduction and death sparked some 500 people to demonstrate in the capital today to demand the resignation of police chiefs." (Para 9). "They are angry that the police failed to find Kanatbekova in time, or her suspect, after the kidnapping had been caught on camera with the car model and number plates clearly visible. The protesters called for the sacking of the interior minister and the city police chief and held banners bearing slogans such as 'Who will answer for Aizada's murder?', 'End the femicide' and 'Who still thinks that murder is a tradition?' Another protester held up a sign reading: 'How many of us need to die before...more
July 16, 2021, 12:22 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"The rally drew some 500 people and prompted Prime Minister Ulugbek Maripov to address the protesters. He asked them to 'have patience' and promised that everyone associated with the kidnapping would be punished, as several demonstrators shouted him down and called for his dismissal too. President Sadyr Japarov on Facebook described Kanatbekova's death as 'a tragedy and pain not only for her family, but also for our entire state'. He said the incident should be 'the last bride kidnapping in history'" (Para 20-23).
June 29, 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"A typical bride kidnapping occurs in a public place. A group of young men locates the young woman that one has chosen for his wife – whom he may know, but perhaps not well – and carries her, screaming and struggling, into a waiting car. The kidnapping victim is taken to the groom’s family home, where the women of the family attempt to talk her into consenting to the marriage. At this stage, some victims are rescued by their father or other male relatives. More often, though, having been kidnapped is so shameful that the victim or her family agrees to marriage rather than risk the stigma of being a...more
June 29, 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"And since Kyrgyzstan has Central Asia’s highest rates of women’s labor emigration – women make up [40% of all Kyrgyz migrants in Russia], a much higher share than those from neighboring Tajikistan and Uzbekistan – migration would be a socially acceptable way to move somewhere where kidnapping is rare" (para 23).
June 29, 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"And our research on labor migration in the country suggests bride kidnapping may push young women to leave their rural communities to avoid forced marriage" (para 4). "In Alay district, a rural region of southern Kyrgyzstan, we found that the young adult daughters of parents in a kidnapping-based marriage were 50% more likely to migrate for work, both within Kyrgyzstan and internationally. Our regression analysis controlled for other factors that could push young women to migrate, such as household size, education and wealth. Survey questions generally cannot distinguish between 'pretend' and 'real' bride kidnappings, so these findings may understate the negative effects of forced marriage on infant health and migration....more
June 29, 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

"Bride kidnapping is common in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, the Caucasus and Central Asia. In rural Kyrgyzstan, where over 60% of the country’s population lives, surveys suggests 1 in 3 marriages begins with a kidnapping. There, bride kidnapping is known as 'ala kachuu,' which translates as 'to take and run away.' It became illegal in 1994, but the practice continues today, especially in rural areas. And our research on labor migration in the country suggests bride kidnapping may push young women to leave their rural communities to avoid forced marriage" (para 2-4). "For example, survey data from Kyrgyzstan finds that the birth weights of the first children born to mothers...more
June 29, 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Bride kidnapping is common in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, the Caucasus and Central Asia. In rural Kyrgyzstan, where over 60% of the country’s population lives, surveys suggests 1 in 3 marriages begins with a kidnapping. There, bride kidnapping is known as 'ala kachuu,' which translates as 'to take and run away.' It became illegal in 1994, but the practice continues today, especially in rural areas" (para 2-3). "Kyrgyzstan, a Central Asian country of 6.5 million, is one of the world’s epicenters of marriage by abduction. A typical bride kidnapping occurs in a public place. A group of young men locates the young woman that one has chosen for his wife...more
June 29, 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: SAB-PRACTICE-1

"But some kidnappings in Kyrgyzstan are clearly nonconsensual. Since 2018 at least two women, Aizada Kanatbekova and Burulai Turdaaly Kyzy, were killed by their kidnappers when they attempted to resist the marriage. Both murders spawned protests nationally and in their hometowns, some of the largest rallies against bride kidnapping seen in Kyrgyzstan since visible public opposition began in the 1990s" (para 13-14).
June 29, 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: MARR-LAW-1

"There, bride kidnapping is known as 'ala kachuu,' which translates as 'to take and run away.' It became illegal in 1994, but the practice continues today, especially in rural areas" (para 3).
June 21, 2021, 5:41 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: ATC-DATA-6

"Kyrgyzstan adopted its most recent National Action Plan (NAP) in 2018 for the period 2018-2020. The NAP consists solely of an implementation matrix and does not provide an overview of the NAP development process or how the implementation of UNSCR 1325 fits into the country’s historical and political context. The NAP identifies three overarching objectives: strengthening the role and participation of women in activities aimed at preserving peace and security; strengthening the interaction between government, local governments and civil sciety in order to prevent conflicts and the risks of violence against women and girls, as well as measures to address the effects of crisis situations; and improving the system of...more
June 15, 2021, 10:20 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, East Timor, Eritrea, India, Indonesia, Israel, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Mauritius, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Turkmenistan, United Kingdom, United States, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: PW-SCALE-1

2.0
May 24, 2021, 2:10 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"In 2020, 100% of births in Kyrgyzstan were attended by skilled health personnele" (p 45).
May 24, 2021, 2:08 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: ISTD-DATA-3

"In 2018, there were .09 new HIV infections per 1,000 uninfected population in Kyrgyzstan" (p 45).
May 24, 2021, 2:07 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"From 2010-2018 the density of nursing and midwifery personnel in Kyrgyzstan was 59.4 per 10,000 population" (p 60).
May 24, 2021, 2:06 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"From 2010-2018 the density of nursing and midwifery personnel in Kyrgyzstan was 59.4 per 10,000 population" (p 60).
May 24, 2021, 1:55 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: MISA-DATA-1

In 2016, the prevalence of anaemia in women of reporducticve age (15-49 years) in Kyrgyzstan was 36.2% (p 68).
April 30, 2021, 4:30 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-3

"When a religious leader in Kyrgyzstan broadcast he had married a second wife, and told other men to follow suit, it's no surprise there was mixed reaction on social media. Chubak aji Jalilov revealed in a video, posted by Nasaat Media on YouTube, 'I have not divorced from my first wife. She is a little bit angry now.' Jalilov claims he is not hiding his second marriage from anyone. His second wife is a 30-year-old widow with a child who lived in Turkey and he is encouraging other men to take a second wife. Why is the former mufti - Muslim legal expert - giving this advice? He blames the...more
April 30, 2021, 4:21 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: PW-LAW-1

"According to the Kyrgyz constitution, polygamy - the practice of marrying more than one woman - is restricted in the central Asian country of approximately six million citizens, most of whom are Turkic-speaking Muslims" (para 4).
April 30, 2021, 3:46 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-3

"Such polygamy victims are becoming more and more in our country. And despite the criminal liability for polygamy, no man in Kyrgyzstan has been punished for this criminal act. It is very difficult to prove polygamy in court (repeated marriages, of course, are not registered, and are covered by religious canons), and women themselves do not write applications, being from a heavy economic and / or psychological dependence on polygamous husbands" (para 6).
April 29, 2021, 4:26 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-3

"A female journalist in Kyrgyzstan, Nazira Begim, has asked Kyrgyz President Sooronbai Jeenbekov to legalize polygamy. She posted her letter to the President of Kyrgyzstan on her Facebook page late last year, amid debates on the religious leader Chubak aji Jalilov's YouTube video post about marrying a second wife. 'The reason for writing the letter to the president was to protect women's rights,' says the journalist. Nazira Begim believes that there has always been polygamy in Kyrgyz society. 'During the Soviet era, having two or more wives was banned. But it completely contradicts our culture and mentality,' says the journalist, who also fights for women's rights. 'Men had raised this...more
April 19, 2021, 4:21 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Palestine, Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-2

3.0
April 19, 2021, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Suriname, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-SCALE-3

2.0
April 19, 2021, 3:54 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, D R Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, North Korea, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Rwanda, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-SCALE-2

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April 7, 2021, 10:31 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"In 2020, 100% of births in Kyrgyzstan were attended by skilled health personnele" (p 45).
April 7, 2021, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: DACH-DATA-1

"In 2016, the life expectancy at birth in Kyrgyzstan was 67.7 years for males and 75.2 years for females" (p 44).