The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Mexico

Sept. 13, 2021, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mexico, Nigeria, Palestine, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Yemen
Variables: LRW-SCALE-12

6.0
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-LAW-1

"Killing a woman because of the victim’s gender (femicide) is a federal offense punishable by 40 to 60 years in prison"(22).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-1

"In May, Congress unanimously approved a constitutional reform on gender parity that establishes a requirement to observe parity in the designation of public officials at every level (federal, state, local) in all three branches of government. A majority of state legislatures approved the reform on June 4[2019], and it came into force on June 7[2019]. The reform states the principle of gender parity should be observed in the designation of cabinet members, selection of candidates for public office by every political party, and designation of members of the judiciary. In accordance with the reform, the Senate elected Monica Fernandez president of the Senate for a year during the legislative session...more
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"Federal law criminalizes rape of men or women, including spousal rape[...]"(22)."Federal labor law prohibits sexual harassment and provides for fines from 250 to 5,000 times the minimum daily wage. Of the 32 states, 16 criminalize sexual harassment, and all states have provisions for punishment when the perpetrator is in a position of power"(23).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The law provides women the same legal status and rights as men and 'equal pay for equal work performed in equal jobs, hours of work, and conditions of efficiency'"(23).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3

"The government did not effectively enforce the law or regulations. According to a 2017 INEGI survey, 12 percent of women had been illegally asked to take a pregnancy test as a prerequisite to being hired"(32).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Forced labor persisted in the industrial and agricultural sectors, especially in the production of chili peppers and tomatoes, as well as in the informal sector. Women and children were subject to domestic servitude. Women, children, indigenous persons, and migrants (including men, women, and children) were the most vulnerable to forced labor"(30).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ERBG-DATA-1

"Women tended to earn substantially less than men did for the same work. Women were more likely to experience discrimination in wages, working hours, and benefits."(23).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: PRN-LAW-1

"As of December 2018, Mexico City and the states of Chihuahua, Jalisco, Puebla, and Yucatan had criminalized the distribution of “revenge pornography” and “sextortion.” Individuals may be prosecuted if they publish or distribute intimate images, audio, videos, or texts without the consent of the other party. The sentence ranges from six months to four years in prison"(23).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"Federal law criminalizes rape of men or women,including spousal rape, and conviction carries penalties of up to 20 years’ imprisonment. Spousal rape is criminalized in 24 states"(22).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"According to the OHCHR, in the first eight months of the year, there were 16 hate crime homicides in Veracruz, committed against nine transgender women and seven gay men(27)."The CNDH reported indigenous women were among the most vulnerable groups in society. They often experienced racism and discrimination and were often victims of violence"(26).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"INEGI reported in 2017 that 23 percent of working women experienced violence in the workplace within the past 12 months and 6 percent experienced sexual violence"(32).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Special Prosecutor’s Office for Violence against Women and Trafficking in Persons in the Attorney General’s Office is responsible for leading government programs to combat domestic violence and prosecuting federal human trafficking cases involving three or fewer suspects. The office had 30 prosecutors, of whom nine were exclusively dedicated to federal cases of violence against women.In addition to shelters, women’s justice centers provided services including legal, psychological, and protective; however, the number of cases far surpassed institutional capacity"(22-23).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"The CNDH reported indigenous women were among the most vulnerable groups in society. They often experienced racism and discrimination and were often victims of violence. Indigenous persons generally had limited access to health care and education services"(26).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"As of October no charges had been filed in the 29 cases of sexual torture between 2006 and 2015 in 12 states. Twenty-seven women reported their torture to a judge, but no investigation was ordered in 18 of the cases. Members of the Secretariat of National Defense, SEMAR, federal police, and state police of Tamaulipas, Veracruz, and Coahuila were allegedly involved"(7).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The legal minimum marriage age is 18.In April[2019], Congress unanimously approved reforms to the law prohibiting child marriage. Excluding Baja California, which retained exceptions in its civil code, all states now prohibit marriage of persons younger than the age of 18 in their civil codes. The reforms came into force on June 4. Previously, some civil codes allowed girls to marry at 14 and boys at 16 with parental consent. With a judge’s consent, children may marry at younger ages"(24).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LBHO-LAW-1

"No laws limit participation of women or members of minorities in the political process, and they did participate"(19).
Sept. 10, 2021, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: FSCB-PRACTICE-1, ABO-DATA-1

"There were no confirmed reports of coerced abortion or involuntary sterilization"(23).
July 12, 2021, 4:04 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"...while in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, the number of femicides rose by 65 percent from March to April 2020 as it entered lockdown[COVID-19 pandemic March 2020]"(para 3).
July 3, 2021, 3:12 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"MEXICO CITY – Mexican feminists protested on June 7th, against the Supreme Court of Justice of the Nation (SCJN) because it endorsed surrogacy in the midst of a prolonged and controversial debate. A group of women, dressed as characters from 'The Handmaid’s Tale,' demonstrated against the Supreme Court’s ruling, which last week validated that states may regulate whether a woman can charge for lending her womb or do so 'altruistically.' 'By endorsing that women and babies are considered commodities that can be rented or bought, they are turning their backs on us. They are not with our human rights, they are with those who want to commodify our bodies,' said...more
July 3, 2021, 3:12 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ACR-LAW-1

"MEXICO CITY – Mexican feminists protested on June 7th, against the Supreme Court of Justice of the Nation (SCJN) because it endorsed surrogacy in the midst of a prolonged and controversial debate. A group of women, dressed as characters from 'The Handmaid’s Tale,' demonstrated against the Supreme Court’s ruling, which last week validated that states may regulate whether a woman can charge for lending her womb or do so 'altruistically'" (para 1-2). "The protest occurs while the Supreme discusses the constitutionality of the Civil Code of Tabasco, which in 1997 became the first to legalize the practice, which is only allowed also in Sinaloa, since 2013. Despite the longevity of...more
July 3, 2021, 3:12 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ACR-PRACTICE-1

"A group of women, dressed as characters from 'The Handmaid’s Tale,' demonstrated against the Supreme Court’s ruling, which last week validated that states may regulate whether a woman can charge for lending her womb or do so 'altruistically.' 'By endorsing that women and babies are considered commodities that can be rented or bought, they are turning their backs on us. They are not with our human rights, they are with those who want to commodify our bodies,' said activist Laura Lecuona as she read a letter addressed to the SCJN" (para 2-3). "However, feminist groups have launched a campaign to pressure the ministers and the president of the Supreme Court...more
June 30, 2021, 9:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"'You can't just sell off a woman as if she were livestock, regardless of how you see their place in society,' said Galvez, whose parents received about $600 at the time of her marriage. Galvez argued that the custom demeans women by treating them as commodities to be bought and sold. The practice, she said, can lead to domestic abuse. 'Sometimes the men are very cruel. They say, "I paid this much for you, and you will do what I say." What kind of respect is that?' Galvez asked" (para 32-35).
June 30, 2021, 9:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-3

"Some say that the concept of women's rights has a different meaning within the patriarchal framework of Indian society. Social worker Mendoza argues that the Western concept of equal rights is jarring within the Indian context. Mendoza regularly makes the back-wrenching, four-hour journey from the city of Tlapa, where she now lives, to Metlatonoc in order to teach Mixtec women to value their traditional roles. At the same time, she encourages women to pursue an education and to demand a role in community decision-making" (para 28-29).
June 30, 2021, 9:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The debate over the 'bride price' is part of a larger dispute over Indian customs in Mexico, which centers on a proposed indigenous rights bill now before Mexico's Congress. Rooted in 1996 peace talks between the government and the Zapatista rebels of southern Chiapas state, the legislation would grant a certain degree of autonomy to the country's 10 million Indians and formally recognize many of their social traditions. In an effort to rally public support for the bill, the Zapatistas are winding their way to Mexico City from Chiapas and are now at the midpoint of their 16-day trek. Advocates say that passage of an Indian rights law would help...more
June 30, 2021, 9:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Mendoza regularly makes the back-wrenching, four-hour journey from the city of Tlapa, where she now lives, to Metlatonoc in order to teach Mixtec women to value their traditional roles. At the same time, she encourages women to pursue an education and to demand a role in community decision-making" (para 29). The effort expended to encourage women to pursue an education may indicate a general societal belief that education is not important for a woman (JLR-CODER COMMENT).
June 30, 2021, 9:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"Poor families, he said, are increasingly 'selling' their daughters to the traffickers in return for previously unheard-of sums of money. Many of the girls, he added, end up as the mistresses of drug lords, who have transformed the Metlatonoc area into a leading producer of opium poppies, the flower used to make heroin. 'No one defends the women,' said Barrera, 'because at the end of the day, the authority is in the hands of men'" (para 19-20).
June 30, 2021, 9:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-5

"METLATONOC, Mexico -- When Rufina Galvez thinks back to her marriage at age 15, it's not the wedding party that stands out in her mind. There was none. Just a payment in 1,000-peso bills and a case of home-brewed beer. 'I cost 60,000 pesos,' the vegetable seller said of the money, at the time worth about $600, that her parents received in return for giving her away in marriage. The custom of the 'bride price,' a kind of reverse dowry system in which the groom's family makes offerings to the bride's, has been practiced for centuries among many of the indigenous peoples of Latin America. Typically, it entails gifts of...more
June 30, 2021, 9:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"METLATONOC, Mexico -- When Rufina Galvez thinks back to her marriage at age 15, it's not the wedding party that stands out in her mind. There was none. Just a payment in 1,000-peso bills and a case of home-brewed beer" (para 1).
June 30, 2021, 9:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-3, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Barrera said his human rights group has intervened on several occasions against what it saw as excessive punishment of young Indian women. In one such case, two teen-ager girls were jailed for a week in Cochoapa, a village near Metlatonoc, for having affairs with local men. The men, Barrera said, were not punished" (para 21).