The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Nigeria

May 24, 2021, 2:10 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"In 2020, 43% of births in Nigeria were attended by skilled health personnele" (p 47).
May 24, 2021, 2:08 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: ISTD-DATA-3

"In 2018, there were .65 new HIV infections per 1,000 uninfected population in Nigeria" (p 47).
May 24, 2021, 2:07 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"From 2010-2018 the density of nursing and midwifery personnel in Nigeria was 11.8 per 10,000 population" (p 62).
May 24, 2021, 2:06 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"From 2010-2018 the density of nursing and midwifery personnel in Nigeria was 11.8 per 10,000 population" (p 62).
May 24, 2021, 1:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MISA-DATA-1

In 2016, the prevalence of anaemia in women of reporducticve age (15-49 years) in Nigeria was 49.8% (p 70).
April 22, 2021, 1:51 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: ATDW-LAW-2

"The CRA prohibits both the marriage of those considered to be children and the betrothal of children. In relation to child marriages, Part III Section 21 states: No person under the age of 18 years is capable of contracting a valid marriage, and accordingly a marriage so contracted is null and void and of no effect whatsoever. Also, Part III Section 22, which prohibits the betrothal of children, maintains that ‘[n]o parent, guardian or any other person shall betroth a child to any person’. A contravention of either section 21 or section 22 amounts to a fine of 500 000 Naira (the equivalent of £2 046 or $3 123) or...more
April 22, 2021, 1:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

""Whenever I visit Yaba Market, the traders start touching and harassing me immediately [after] I alight from a bus or a bike. I can't help but reply 'no touch me again,' " says Medlyne, who's a student at the University of Lagos. It's a common occurrence. In a poll of 105 women from February 2019, The Guardian Nigeria found that three quarters of those surveyed said they had experienced harassment at Nigerian markets. The traders say that's just the way they drum up business. "We are hustlers, so sometimes we need to touch," says Victor Robinson, who sells ladies' trousers at Yaba. Another trader, Emmanuel Ugorji, says women bring on...more
April 22, 2021, 1:39 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"The practice of demanding sexual favors in exchange for employment or university grades remained common. Women suffered harassment for social and religious reasons in some regions" (Page 6).
April 22, 2021, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-LAW-2

"No statutes prohibit sexual harassment, but assault statutes provide for prosecution of violent harassment. The law criminalizes stalking, but it does not explicitly criminalize sexual harassment. The law also criminalizes emotional, verbal, and psychological abuse and acts of intimidation" (Page 6)
April 19, 2021, 4:21 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Palestine, Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-2

3.0
April 19, 2021, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burma/Myanmar, Haiti, Iran, Mexico, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Philippines, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: AOM-SCALE-3

4.0
April 19, 2021, 3:54 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burma/Myanmar, Haiti, Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mexico, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, United States, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: AOM-SCALE-2

2.0
April 7, 2021, 10:31 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"In 2020, 43% of births in Nigeria were attended by skilled health personnele" (p 47).
April 7, 2021, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DACH-DATA-1

"In 2016, the life expectancy at birth in Nigeria was 54.7 years for males and 55.7 years for females" (p 46).
April 2, 2021, 9:47 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IM-DATA-1

"In 2018, the under-five mortality rate in Nigeria was 120 per 1000 live births" (p 47).
March 31, 2021, 3:37 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MMR-SCALE-1

"In 2017, the maternal mortality ratio for women in Nigeria was 917 per 100,000 live births" (p 47).
March 31, 2021, 3:22 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MMR-DATA-1

"In 2017, the maternal mortality ratio for women in Nigeria was 917 per 100,000 live births" (p 47).
March 30, 2021, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MMR-DATA-1

"In 2020 the maternal mortality ratio for women in Nigeria was 917 per 100,000 live births" (p 47).
March 30, 2021, 7:36 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"From 2010-2017 in Nigeria the proportion of ever-partnered women and girls aged 15-49 years subjected to physical and/or sexual violence by a current or former intimate partner in the previous 12 months was 11%" (p 70).
March 30, 2021, 7:31 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DACH-DATA-3

"From 2010-2019 the proportion of women in Nigeria of reproductive age who have their need for family planning satified with modern methods is 45.5%" (p 54).
March 19, 2021, 3:56 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The adolescent birth rate from 2010-2018 in Nigeria is 106.0 per 1000 women aged 15-19 years" (p 54).
March 19, 2021, 1:30 p.m.
Countries: Benin, Cape Verde, Cote D'Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Nigeria
Variables: PW-LAW-1

"Six West African countries have civil codes that formally prohibit polygamy (Benin, Cabo Verde, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea and Nigeria) but legal restrictions are rarely enforced" (para 1).
March 13, 2021, 6:09 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MARR-LAW-2

"Nigerian law criminalizes same-sex conduct as well as public show of same-sex amorous relationships, same-sex marriages, and the registration of gay clubs, societies, and organizations" (para 24). "A Sharia (Islamic law) court in Kano in January fined 11 women charged under the state’s Immoral Acts law for allegedly planning a same-sex wedding. The victims were arrested in December, 2018 by local religious police, known as Hisbah" (para 26).
March 13, 2021, 6:09 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: NGOFW-PRACTICE-1, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"In April, about 65 women were arrested in Abuja by a task force comprising officers from the city's environment and social development agency and local police during raids on night clubs. Women’s rights groups took to the streets to protest the raids and the allegations by some arrested women that policemen sexually abused, exploited and extorted them in custody. Twenty-nine women pleaded guilty to prostitution charges and were ordered to pay a fine of three thousand naira (about US$8.50) each" (para 15).
March 13, 2021, 6:09 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-4

"Nigerian law criminalizes same-sex conduct as well as public show of same-sex amorous relationships, same-sex marriages, and the registration of gay clubs, societies, and organizations" (para 24). "In January, Lagos state police spokesperson Dolapo Badmos, through her private Instagram account warned gay people to leave Nigeria or risk prosecution under the Same Sex Marriage Prohibition Act" (para 25). "A Sharia (Islamic law) court in Kano in January fined 11 women charged under the state’s Immoral Acts law for allegedly planning a same-sex wedding. The victims were arrested in December, 2018 by local religious police, known as Hisbah" (para 26).
March 8, 2021, 9:44 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
Feb. 13, 2021, 7:35 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: INFIB-LAW-1

“Collins and Akaziebie v. Sweden (8 March 2007 (decision on the admissibility)): The applicants, Nigerian nationals, are mother and daughter. They alleged that they would be subjected to female genital mutilation if they were returned to Nigeria, in violation of Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment) of the Convention. The Swedish Migration Board rejected their applications for asylum, refugee status or a residence permit, stating, inter alia, that female genital mutilation was prohibited by law in Nigeria and that this prohibition was observed in at least six Nigerian states. Thus, if the applicants returned to one of those states it would be unlikely that they would be forced...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 7:35 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1

“Collins and Akaziebie v. Sweden (8 March 2007 (decision on the admissibility)): The applicants, Nigerian nationals, are mother and daughter. They alleged that they would be subjected to female genital mutilation if they were returned to Nigeria, in violation of Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment) of the Convention. The Swedish Migration Board rejected their applications for asylum, refugee status or a residence permit, stating, inter alia, that female genital mutilation was prohibited by law in Nigeria and that this prohibition was observed in at least six Nigerian states. Thus, if the applicants returned to one of those states it would be unlikely that they would be forced...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 7:35 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

“Omeredo v. Austria (20 September 2011 (decision on the admissibility)): The applicant, born in 1973, fled Nigeria in 2003 to avoid female genital mutilation. Her sister had already died of the consequences and she alleged there was a risk villagers would kill her if she refused and that her mother had told her she must co-operate. Her request for asylum was unsuccessful. The Court declared the case inadmissible as being manifestly ill-founded. It was not in dispute that subjecting any person, child or adult, to female genital mutilation would amount to ill-treatment contrary to Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment) of the Convention. The Court noted, however, that...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 7:35 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: INFIB-DATA-2

“Izevbekhai v. Ireland (17 May 2011 (decision on the admissibility)): The applicant and her two daughters claimed the girls risk female genital mutilation if the family was returned to Nigeria, in violation of Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment) of the Convention. They alleged that the mother’s eldest daughter died aged one from profuse bleeding after female genital mutilation was performed by an ‘elder’. The family left Nigeria for Ireland in the face of pressure from the father’s family to perform female genital mutilation on the two younger girls. Their request for asylum was unsuccessful. The Court declared the application inadmissible as being manifestly ill-founded. It found in...more