The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Qatar

March 16, 2022, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-3

"She reported the June 6, 2021 attack to the Qatari authorities, who responded by accusing her of having an affair and charged her with 'extramarital sex', which is illegal in the Gulf state. Schietekat was told by lawyers that one way of avoiding conviction was to marry her attacker but instead decided to flee the country, leaving behind what she called her 'dream job'. The charges against Schietekat, who is a behavioural economist, are still valid and she is expected to be sentenced in absentia on March 6" (Para. 3-5). "She was then warned by lawyers that one of the only ways to avoid a conviction would be to marry...more
March 16, 2022, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"She also attacked the Mexican foreign ministry for failing to protect its 600 citizens living in Qatar, especially against gender-based violence" (Para. 24).
March 16, 2022, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"A female World Cup official is facing a sentence of 100 lashes and seven years in jail for 'extramarital sex' after she reported being raped while working in Qatar" (Para. 1).
March 16, 2022, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"She also revealed she was previously raped when she was 17 but that she did not speak out about the ordeal at the time, as she explained why she chose to go public with the allegation" (Para. 20).
March 16, 2022, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"The following morning she got a medical certificate and, with an official from the Mexican consul in Doha, reported the alleged rape to Qatari police using her limited Arabic. Police asked whether she wanted a restraining order against the attacker or to press criminal charges against him. Schietekat told police she wanted to press charges and signed a statement in Arabic to the effect, giving officers the name and details of the man. However, hours later, around 9pm, she was called and told to return to the station where she was put in front of the man she had accused and questioned for three hours in Arabic. The alleged attacker...more
March 16, 2022, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"Paola Schietekat, 28, from Mexico, was working for the World Cup organising committee when she complained that she was raped by an associate who broke into her apartment and threatened to kill her" (Para. 2). "Schietekat, writing on Julio Astillero, explained the attacker was able to gain access to her apartment in Doha because it is common for residents to leave their doors unlocked and rely on the security of the building. The man, who Schietekat said she considered a friend, allegedly managed to wrestle her to the floor and rape her, leaving her arms, shoulders and back covered in bruises. Schietekat said she took pictures of the scene and...more
March 16, 2022, 4:06 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-3

"She reported the June 6, 2021 attack to the Qatari authorities, who responded by accusing her of having an affair and charged her with 'extramarital sex', which is illegal in the Gulf state. Schietekat was told by lawyers that one way of avoiding conviction was to marry her attacker but instead decided to flee the country, leaving behind what she called her 'dream job'. The charges against Schietekat, who is a behavioural economist, are still valid and she is expected to be sentenced in absentia on March 6" (Para. 3-5). "She was then warned by lawyers that one of the only ways to avoid a conviction would be to marry...more
March 16, 2022, 4:06 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"She also revealed she was previously raped when she was 17 but that she did not speak out about the ordeal at the time, as she explained why she chose to go public with the allegation" (Para. 20).
March 16, 2022, 4:06 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"A female World Cup official is facing a sentence of 100 lashes and seven years in jail for 'extramarital sex' after she reported being raped while working in Qatar" (Para. 1).
March 16, 2022, 4:06 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"Paola Schietekat, 28, from Mexico, was working for the World Cup organising committee when she complained that she was raped by an associate who broke into her apartment and threatened to kill her" (Para. 2). "Schietekat, writing on Julio Astillero, explained the attacker was able to gain access to her apartment in Doha because it is common for residents to leave their doors unlocked and rely on the security of the building. The man, who Schietekat said she considered a friend, allegedly managed to wrestle her to the floor and rape her, leaving her arms, shoulders and back covered in bruises. Schietekat said she took pictures of the scene and...more
March 16, 2022, 4:06 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"The following morning she got a medical certificate and, with an official from the Mexican consul in Doha, reported the alleged rape to Qatari police using her limited Arabic. Police asked whether she wanted a restraining order against the attacker or to press criminal charges against him. Schietekat told police she wanted to press charges and signed a statement in Arabic to the effect, giving officers the name and details of the man. However, hours later, around 9pm, she was called and told to return to the station where she was put in front of the man she had accused and questioned for three hours in Arabic. The alleged attacker...more
Jan. 26, 2022, 5:25 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Egypt, Eritrea, Fiji, India, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Qatar, South Sudan, Sudan, United Arab Emirates
Variables: IIP-SCALE-1

3.0
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"'I am optimistic because women have been vocal. Women are sick of it, younger women are very frustrated and this is a modern country, women are highly educated in many cases. With the World Cup coming, there will be a lot of focus on rights there, exposure will help.' The Qatari government told the Guardian it wanted to build on progress made in incorporating women into the highest levels of politics and other professional fields, and said Qatari women held senior posts in many areas and achieved the highest levels of education" (para 22-23).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"Women reported being asked for proof of marriage to access some sexual and reproductive healthcare, antenatal care, vaginal ultrasounds and smear tests" (para 12).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts" (para 5). "'Women are often asked to have permission from a male guardian even if it’s not written in the regulations. So, the government told us that women don’t need male permission to work, yet in many government jobs HR [human resources departments] were saying: "Show us a letter from a man"'" (para 9).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-1

"The Qatari government told the Guardian it wanted to build on progress made in incorporating women into the highest levels of politics and other professional fields, and said Qatari women held senior posts in many areas and achieved the highest levels of education" (para 23).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"Opaque rules on male guardianship leave women without basic freedoms, according to Human Rights Watch (HRW), which has analysed for the first time the way the system works in practice. Researchers looked at 27 laws covering work, accommodation and status and found that women must get permission from male 'guardians' – fathers, brothers, uncles and husbands – to exercise many basic rights. They cannot be primary carers of their children, even if they are divorced or the children’s father has died. If the child has no male relative to act as guardian, the government takes on this role. The Qatari government said the accounts in the report are 'inaccurate' and...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3, ERBG-LAW-2

"Women are often asked to have permission from a male guardian even if it’s not written in the regulations. So, the government told us that women don’t need male permission to work, yet in many government jobs HR [human resources departments] were saying: ‘Show us a letter from a man'" (para 9).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There has been some backlash against gender discrimination, but women find it hard to speak out" (para 16). "After Saudi Arabia reformed its own system of male guardianship, some women in Qatar tried to protest against theirs by using an anonymous social media account. Within 24 hours the authorities had shut it down. When Maadeed went public about her escape, discussions began again on social media about women’s rights. In January 2020, Qatar responded by lifting the requirement on women to have a guardian’s permission to obtain driving licences" (para 19-20). "I am optimistic because women have been vocal. Women are sick of it, younger women are very frustrated and...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). "Researchers looked at 27 laws covering work, accommodation and status and found that women must get permission from male 'guardians' – fathers, brothers, uncles and husbands – to exercise many basic rights. They cannot be primary carers of their children, even if they are divorced or the children’s father has died. If the child has no male relative to act as guardian, the government takes on this role" (para 3). "Women interviewed for...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"After Saudi Arabia reformed its own system of male guardianship, some women in Qatar tried to protest against theirs by using an anonymous social media account. Within 24 hours the authorities had shut it down. When Maadeed went public about her escape, discussions began again on social media about women’s rights. In January 2020, Qatar responded by lifting the requirement on women to have a guardian’s permission to obtain driving licences" (para 19-20).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). "Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts" (para 5).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1, CLCC-LAW-2

"In a written response to HRW, the government disputed the claims and said that women could act as guardians to obtain passports or ID cards for their children, that women did not need permission to accept a scholarship or to work at ministries, government institutions or schools and that guardian approval was also not required for educational field trips at Qatar University" (para 24).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CLCW-LAW-2

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). "'Or, passport law says a woman can get her own passport but there have been instances where officials say a father must approve the application,' said Begum" (para 10). "Noof al-Maadeed decided to leave Qatar after years of domestic abuse and restrictions: '[I was] only allowed to go to school and back. Anything else [and I could] expect a beating,' she said. But Qatari government rules prohibit unmarried women under 25 from travelling...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). While this datum does not indicate that women are forced to marry against their will, it suggests that women cannot marry according to their will if it is not consistent with a males permission and desires (JLR-CODER COMMENT). "Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Noof al-Maadeed decided to leave Qatar after years of domestic abuse and restrictions: '[I was] only allowed to go to school and back. Anything else [and I could] expect a beating,' she said. But Qatari government rules prohibit unmarried women under 25 from travelling abroad without the permission of their male guardian" (para 17).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

"Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts" (para 5). "Even where they led 'privileged' lives, guardianship rules leave women treated 'as children', said 'Lolwa', 44, whose father agreed to let her drive when she was 33. 'When I am working in my job, I’m the one signing contracts. I am treated like an adult on one side but on the other side, I’m not an adult'" (para 13). "When Maadeed went public about her escape,...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). In a written response to HRW, the government disputed the claims and said that women could act as guardians to obtain passports or ID cards for their children, that women did not need permission to accept a scholarship or to work at ministries, government institutions or schools and that guardian approval was also not required for educational field trips at Qatar University" (para 24).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: GP-DATA-3, GP-DATA-5, NGOFW-DATA-1

"There are no anti-discrimination laws in Qatar, no agency you can go to if you want to complain. There are no functioning women’s rights organisations who can monitor how women are treated or hold the government to account" (para 11).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CUST-LAW-1

"Researchers looked at 27 laws covering work, accommodation and status and found that women must get permission from male 'guardians' – fathers, brothers, uncles and husbands – to exercise many basic rights. They cannot be primary carers of their children, even if they are divorced or the children’s father has died. If the child has no male relative to act as guardian, the government takes on this role. The Qatari government said the accounts in the report are 'inaccurate' and do not truly represent the country’s 'constitution laws or policies'. In a statement they promised to investigate all the cases mentioned and prosecute anyone who has broken the law" (para...more