The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Qatar

Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"'I am optimistic because women have been vocal. Women are sick of it, younger women are very frustrated and this is a modern country, women are highly educated in many cases. With the World Cup coming, there will be a lot of focus on rights there, exposure will help.' The Qatari government told the Guardian it wanted to build on progress made in incorporating women into the highest levels of politics and other professional fields, and said Qatari women held senior posts in many areas and achieved the highest levels of education" (para 22-23).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"Women reported being asked for proof of marriage to access some sexual and reproductive healthcare, antenatal care, vaginal ultrasounds and smear tests" (para 12).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts" (para 5). "'Women are often asked to have permission from a male guardian even if it’s not written in the regulations. So, the government told us that women don’t need male permission to work, yet in many government jobs HR [human resources departments] were saying: "Show us a letter from a man"'" (para 9).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-1

"The Qatari government told the Guardian it wanted to build on progress made in incorporating women into the highest levels of politics and other professional fields, and said Qatari women held senior posts in many areas and achieved the highest levels of education" (para 23).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"Opaque rules on male guardianship leave women without basic freedoms, according to Human Rights Watch (HRW), which has analysed for the first time the way the system works in practice. Researchers looked at 27 laws covering work, accommodation and status and found that women must get permission from male 'guardians' – fathers, brothers, uncles and husbands – to exercise many basic rights. They cannot be primary carers of their children, even if they are divorced or the children’s father has died. If the child has no male relative to act as guardian, the government takes on this role. The Qatari government said the accounts in the report are 'inaccurate' and...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3, ERBG-LAW-2

"Women are often asked to have permission from a male guardian even if it’s not written in the regulations. So, the government told us that women don’t need male permission to work, yet in many government jobs HR [human resources departments] were saying: ‘Show us a letter from a man'" (para 9).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There has been some backlash against gender discrimination, but women find it hard to speak out" (para 16). "After Saudi Arabia reformed its own system of male guardianship, some women in Qatar tried to protest against theirs by using an anonymous social media account. Within 24 hours the authorities had shut it down. When Maadeed went public about her escape, discussions began again on social media about women’s rights. In January 2020, Qatar responded by lifting the requirement on women to have a guardian’s permission to obtain driving licences" (para 19-20). "I am optimistic because women have been vocal. Women are sick of it, younger women are very frustrated and...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). "Researchers looked at 27 laws covering work, accommodation and status and found that women must get permission from male 'guardians' – fathers, brothers, uncles and husbands – to exercise many basic rights. They cannot be primary carers of their children, even if they are divorced or the children’s father has died. If the child has no male relative to act as guardian, the government takes on this role" (para 3). "Women interviewed for...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"After Saudi Arabia reformed its own system of male guardianship, some women in Qatar tried to protest against theirs by using an anonymous social media account. Within 24 hours the authorities had shut it down. When Maadeed went public about her escape, discussions began again on social media about women’s rights. In January 2020, Qatar responded by lifting the requirement on women to have a guardian’s permission to obtain driving licences" (para 19-20).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). "Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts" (para 5).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1, CLCC-LAW-2

"In a written response to HRW, the government disputed the claims and said that women could act as guardians to obtain passports or ID cards for their children, that women did not need permission to accept a scholarship or to work at ministries, government institutions or schools and that guardian approval was also not required for educational field trips at Qatar University" (para 24).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CLCW-LAW-2

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). "'Or, passport law says a woman can get her own passport but there have been instances where officials say a father must approve the application,' said Begum" (para 10). "Noof al-Maadeed decided to leave Qatar after years of domestic abuse and restrictions: '[I was] only allowed to go to school and back. Anything else [and I could] expect a beating,' she said. But Qatari government rules prohibit unmarried women under 25 from travelling...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). While this datum does not indicate that women are forced to marry against their will, it suggests that women cannot marry according to their will if it is not consistent with a males permission and desires (JLR-CODER COMMENT). "Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Noof al-Maadeed decided to leave Qatar after years of domestic abuse and restrictions: '[I was] only allowed to go to school and back. Anything else [and I could] expect a beating,' she said. But Qatari government rules prohibit unmarried women under 25 from travelling abroad without the permission of their male guardian" (para 17).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

"Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts" (para 5). "Even where they led 'privileged' lives, guardianship rules leave women treated 'as children', said 'Lolwa', 44, whose father agreed to let her drive when she was 33. 'When I am working in my job, I’m the one signing contracts. I am treated like an adult on one side but on the other side, I’m not an adult'" (para 13). "When Maadeed went public about her escape,...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). In a written response to HRW, the government disputed the claims and said that women could act as guardians to obtain passports or ID cards for their children, that women did not need permission to accept a scholarship or to work at ministries, government institutions or schools and that guardian approval was also not required for educational field trips at Qatar University" (para 24).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: GP-DATA-3, GP-DATA-5, NGOFW-DATA-1

"There are no anti-discrimination laws in Qatar, no agency you can go to if you want to complain. There are no functioning women’s rights organisations who can monitor how women are treated or hold the government to account" (para 11).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CUST-LAW-1

"Researchers looked at 27 laws covering work, accommodation and status and found that women must get permission from male 'guardians' – fathers, brothers, uncles and husbands – to exercise many basic rights. They cannot be primary carers of their children, even if they are divorced or the children’s father has died. If the child has no male relative to act as guardian, the government takes on this role. The Qatari government said the accounts in the report are 'inaccurate' and do not truly represent the country’s 'constitution laws or policies'. In a statement they promised to investigate all the cases mentioned and prosecute anyone who has broken the law" (para...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts. 'Girls are [constantly] in quarantine,' said one woman. 'What the whole world experiences now, this is normal life for girls in Qatar'" (para 5-6). If women are unable to leave the house without a male guardian's permission, they would not be able to vote without the permission of a male to go and do so (JLR-CODER COMMENT).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). "'The government in Qatar don’t want women to know the rules,' she said. 'They want men to have power and control. So if laws are changed, the government don’t inform women and when they introduce restrictions they don’t tell them that clearly, either. These laws exist in a nefarious way and women have to base decisions on an assumption that they must be obedient to men'" (para 8).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-3, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"'The government in Qatar don’t want women to know the rules,' she said. 'They want men to have power and control. So if laws are changed, the government don’t inform women and when they introduce restrictions they don’t tell them that clearly, either. These laws exist in a nefarious way and women have to base decisions on an assumption that they must be obedient to men'" (para 8).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts. 'Girls are [constantly] in quarantine,' said one woman. 'What the whole world experiences now, this is normal life for girls in Qatar'" (para 5-6). "Even where they led 'privileged' lives, guardianship rules leave women treated 'as children', said 'Lolwa', 44, whose father agreed to let her drive when she was 33. 'When I am working in my job, I’m the one signing contracts. I am treated like an...more
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: MISA-PRACTICE-1, SUICIDE-DATA-1

"Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts" (para 5).
Sept. 13, 2021, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Rep, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Cyprus, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Fiji, Finland, Gambia, Georgia, Greece, Guyana, India, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Liberia, Lithuania, Malawi, Malta, Mongolia, Mozambique, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zambia
Variables: LRW-SCALE-12

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Aug. 6, 2021, 1:01 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Reports of east African workers being raped and tortured across the region and haunting videos of Kenyan women pleading for help after allegedly being abused by their employers saw the Kenyan government follow other countries such as Indonesia and the Philippines in banning its citizens from travelling to work in the Gulf in 2014. Since then the government has been grappling with how to allow women and the country’s economy to benefit from the huge demand for migrant domestic workers from countries such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar, while keeping those who want to travel for work safe" (7-8). "Paul Adhoch, the executive director of Trace Kenya, a Mombasa-based counter-trafficking...more
July 9, 2021, 11:47 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-4

"Homosexuality can be punished by death and any public display of affection is against the law. Men outnumber women by more than three to one"(para 7).
July 9, 2021, 11:47 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: PW-LAW-1

"Islamic polygamy is permitted"(para 42).
July 9, 2021, 11:47 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Until recently Qatar Airways sacked female workers if they got pregnant or married within the first five years of their employment.The rules were relaxed five years ago after pressure from international labour groups"(para 59,60).
July 9, 2021, 11:47 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Much of the world has been stunned after a group of Australian women had their genitals 'invasively examined' after a premature baby was found at Hamad International Airport in Doha. The thirteen travellers were hauled off a Sydney-bound flight on October 2 and led through the terminal to ambulances where they were subjected to medical checks to determine if they had just given birth. One of the women who was strip searched told the ABC she would take part in a class action if the 12 other women came forward.Two of the 13, who wanted to remain anonymous, said no one at the airport spoke English or tried to explain...more
July 9, 2021, 11:47 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"As with some other countries in the region, sex outside of marriage is illegal and victims of sexual assault may be arrested, detained and prosecuted for adultery"(para 6).