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Latest items for Russia

Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: NGOFW-PRACTICE-1

"'It's much more dangerous when the threat exists in your home which is meant to be a safe place," says Diana Barsegyan of the anti-domestic violence advocacy group, Nasiliu.net...Working at Nasiliu.net just got that bit harder. In December last year it was added to the justice ministry's list of foreign agents, which now includes a wide range of civil society organisations. All of its campaign material including guidance on shelters or hotlines for battered women now needs a gigantic 'foreign agent' stamp on it. 'It's a huge problem,' Ms Barsegyan says. 'All our supporters understand it's just a stupid law and we're not agents of another country, but for people...more
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There are important voices helping. Yuri Dud, Russia's most influential YouTuber, just posted his support for Nasiliu.net on his Instagram page and asked his followers to help fund the organisation" (para 29). "Margarita Gracheva, whose husband cut off her hands days after she begged police to protect her from him, is using her painfully won prominence to get the nation talking in a new TV show about domestic violence. State media may avoid a host of issues but horrific domestic violence cases like Ms Gracheva's and Ms Pekhteleva's do make and stay in the headlines, especially when the failings of law enforcement are so clear to see" (para 30).more
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MURDER-DATA-2, NGOFW-DATA-1

"In 2018, the government statistics agency recorded a total of 8,300 women killed. That works out at 22 a day. Contrast that with the UK rate of one woman murdered every three days. Like in Britain, NGOs say the majority of those happened in the home. The official number for domestic violence murders for 2018 was just 253" (para 19-20).
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-DATA-1

":She had just come to collect her things. It was January 2020. Vera Pekhteleva, a 23-year-old university student, had told her boyfriend their relationship was over. She was living elsewhere and had found somebody new. When the grey metal door in a dingy corridor on Kemerovo's Leningradsky Proskpekt shut behind her, she would not leave the flat again alive. This week the case against her ex-boyfriend, Vladislav Kanyus, also 23, was sent back to the prosecutor's office so that it could be resubmitted on charges of murder with particular cruelty. Before remanding the case, the judge listed each of the 111 injuries Ms Pekhteleva sustained in the three-and-a-half-hours before Kanyus...more
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-LAW-2

"In 2017 Russia decriminalised first instance domestic battery, meaning anything which doesn't end up in hospital is classified as an administrative offence. There is no specific category for violence by a relative. The penalty is the same as being punched by a stranger on the street" (para 22).
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Publicity works. 'Society has helped the authorities look more closely at the case,' Mr Pekhtelev says. 'Now it is up to the judges.' Sky News approached the Kemerovo police force and local investigative committee for comment but has yet to receive a response. Ms Pekhteleva's murder was horrific but it was not unusual" (para 16-18). "Russia's authorities do have plenty of tools to influence abusers but they don't use them. Even as civil society tries to step forward, Russia has a leadership which looks back. Efforts to protect women are seen by conservative lawmakers as an infringement on the rights of the family. Regulation to punish political dissent is being...more
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"In 2017 Russia decriminalised first instance domestic battery, meaning anything which doesn't end up in hospital is classified as an administrative offence. There is no specific category for violence by a relative. The penalty is the same as being punched by a stranger on the street" (para 22). "Russia's authorities do have plenty of tools to influence abusers but they don't use them. Even as civil society tries to step forward, Russia has a leadership which looks back. Efforts to protect women are seen by conservative lawmakers as an infringement on the rights of the family. Regulation to punish political dissent is being rushed through at breakneck speed but the...more
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-LAW-3

"'It's much more dangerous when the threat exists in your home which is meant to be a safe place,' says Diana Barsegyan of the anti-domestic violence advocacy group, Nasiliu.net. 'Plus the victim must prove everything themselves and often the police don't respond or come to investigate. They're not educated, they don't understand that violence can come in many forms. They don't, for example, understand the idea of rape in a marriage'" (para 23-24).
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"'It's much more dangerous when the threat exists in your home which is meant to be a safe place,' says Diana Barsegyan of the anti-domestic violence advocacy group, Nasiliu.net. 'Plus the victim must prove everything themselves and often the police don't respond or come to investigate. They're not educated, they don't understand that violence can come in many forms. They don't, for example, understand the idea of rape in a marriage'" (para 23-24). It is difficult for women to receive help from the police. (JLR-CODER COMMENT)
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"Margarita Gracheva, whose husband cut off her hands days after she begged police to protect her from him, is using her painfully won prominence to get the nation talking in a new TV show about domestic violence. State media may avoid a host of issues but horrific domestic violence cases like Ms Gracheva's and Ms Pekhteleva's do make and stay in the headlines, especially when the failings of law enforcement are so clear to see" (para 30). Media used to discuss social issues such as domestic violence. (JLR-CODER COMMENT)
Sept. 22, 2021, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-1

"Efforts to protect women are seen by conservative lawmakers as an infringement on the rights of the family" (para 41).
Sept. 13, 2021, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Denmark, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, France, Gabon, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Jordan, Macedonia, Montenegro, Morocco, Paraguay, Peru, Romania, Russia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, Turkey, Vanuatu
Variables: LRW-SCALE-12

3.0
July 21, 2021, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"But it’s not much help for Ms. Medvedeva, whose qualifications were deemed to be outdated after her long legal battle, and who now works in a maintenance station for oil tankers in Samara. And experts warn that occupational equality still has a long way to go, both in terms of jobs still barred to women and in subtler gender discrimination outside legal obstacles" (Para 5). "'I know a lot of cases when women were fired because of their gender. Women will still be prevented from being divers, miners, and steelworkers. There are women who work in the firefighting service but, no matter what they may wish, remained confined to office...more
July 21, 2021, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"Ms. Medvedeva had the necessary degree, training, and years of experience working aboard the passenger ships that ply the vast Volga River, which flows by her home town of Samara. But in 2012 she was denied advancement because commanding a riverboat was one of 456 professions in Russia legally barred to women for being considered too hazardous or arduous for them to perform. She ended up suing over the law" (Para 2). "'I was blocked from doing what I wanted not because I was unqualified, but just because I was a woman,' says Ms. Medvedeva. She spent five years fighting in the courts, received support from the United Nations, and...more
July 21, 2021, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3

"Some women have found a niche, or a way around the rules. Olga Silantyeva drives an emergency vehicle for a first-responder team in the Moscow region. She says that she has earned the respect of the men she works with and enjoys her job. But there have been frustrations. As a qualified automotive engineer, she had previously applied for jobs as a truck driver and been turned down. On one occasion she’d been told that the position was filled, but later discovered that it was still open" (Para 14).
July 21, 2021, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

"'Even if the ban is lifted, it will still be hard to get in,' she says. 'The main obstacle is men. They just don’t like a woman intruding into what they regard as their space'" (Para 17).
July 15, 2021, 10:21 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

"Currently, women’s employment is restricted in 456 occupations in 38 industries. These occupations are listed in Government of the Russian Federation Resolution No. 162, Feb. 25, 2000, which the newly issued ministerial order will replace. The need for reducing the number of occupations in which women’s employment is restricted was expressed in the National Strategy of Actions for the Advancement of Women’s Interests for 2017–2022. The Strategy states that technological advancements have allowed women to work in the professions previously deemed dangerous and have made some of the previously restricted occupations redundant"(para 2).
July 15, 2021, 10:21 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"On July 18, 2019, the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation issued an order shortening the list of professions in which women’s employment is restricted. (Order of the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation No. 512, On Approval of the List of Industries, Jobs and Positions with Harmful and (or) Dangerous Working Conditions, in Which the Use of Women’s Labor Is Restricted, July 18, 2019.) The ministerial order, which will take effect on January 1, 2021, lists 21 industries and 100 occupations in which women’s participation is restricted. The categorization of these occupations as dangerous for women and their inclusion on the...more
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Domestic violence is one of the most severe social issues in modern Russia. According to Russian and international NGOs working with domestic violence victims, every 4th Russian family has experienced different forms of violence. Russian women become victims of domestic violence in 75% reported cases. Moreover, up to 40% of all serious violent crimes and 2/3 of all homicides committed within families or households" (para 1). "However, according to the official statistics, since 2017, almost 80% of all domestic abusers have been punished with fines instead of being jailed! Moreover, after implementing the new law, the number of domestic violence cases increased 2.5 times according to data collected by local...more
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"The Social Media campaign 'I didn’t want to die' became another critical milestone in the movement against domestic violence in Russia. A few feminist activists launched this campaign in the summer of 2019. The campaign became viral literally in a moment. For a few weeks, 12,000 women, including influencers with millions of followers, posted their photos with bloody makeups to tackle domestic abuse. Around 26,000 messages about the campaign were posted on Social Media. The most popular post had more than 420,000 likes and was widely shared. The main result of this campaign was launching the petition calling for a new law against domestic violence in Russia. Last year around...more
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"Unfortunately, Russian police don’t like to investigate this type of crime. That’s why only 3% of all reported cases are going to court, and almost half of all initially reported cases (40%) related to domestic violence are lost during investigations. Moreover, Russia is one of 18 countries where domestic violence has been decriminalized regardless of all these statistics!" (para 2). According to the figure entitled "Domestic violence in Russia", "60-70% of victims do not seek help" (para 5). Since the majority of women facing domestic violence do not report, it is likely that there are taboos against reporting domestic violence (JLR-CODER COMMENT).
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2, MURDER-DATA-2

According to the figure entitled "Domestic vioence in Russia", "14,000 Women die as a result of domestic violence every year, that is one woman every 40 minutes" (para 5).
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Unfortunately, Russian police don’t like to investigate this type of crime. That’s why only 3% of all reported cases are going to court, and almost half of all initially reported cases (40%) related to domestic violence are lost during investigations. Moreover, Russia is one of 18 countries where domestic violence has been decriminalized regardless of all these statistics!" (para 2). "However, according to the official statistics, since 2017, almost 80% of all domestic abusers have been punished with fines instead of being jailed! Moreover, after implementing the new law, the number of domestic violence cases increased 2.5 times according to data collected by local and international NGOs" (para 5). According...more
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The current social movement against domestic violence in Russia started in 2016 when Elena Mizulina, the State Duma Chairwoman, proposed passing a new amendment decriminalizing domestic violence to the Code of the Russian Federation on Administrative Offenses. President Putin signed this amendment in February 2017" (para 3). "Our movement against domestic violence got the most significant push in 2019 thereupon the Khachaturyan sisters’ case became public. A year before three sisters, 17, 18, and 19 years old had killed their father in self-defense, as they were subjected to constant violence and sexual abuse for an extended time. The sisters had been arrested on the same day, but Russians were sure...more
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"Domestic violence is one of the most severe social issues in modern Russia. According to Russian and international NGOs working with domestic violence victims, every 4th Russian family has experienced different forms of violence. Russian women become victims of domestic violence in 75% reported cases. Moreover, up to 40% of all serious violent crimes and 2/3 of all homicides committed within families or households" (para 1). "However, according to the official statistics, since 2017, almost 80% of all domestic abusers have been punished with fines instead of being jailed! Moreover, after implementing the new law, the number of domestic violence cases increased 2.5 times according to data collected by local...more
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"Unfortunately, Russian police don’t like to investigate this type of crime. That’s why only 3% of all reported cases are going to court, and almost half of all initially reported cases (40%) related to domestic violence are lost during investigations. Moreover, Russia is one of 18 countries where domestic violence has been decriminalized regardless of all these statistics! The current social movement against domestic violence in Russia started in 2016 when Elena Mizulina, the State Duma Chairwoman, proposed passing a new amendment decriminalizing domestic violence to the Code of the Russian Federation on Administrative Offenses. President Putin signed this amendment in February 2017" (para 2-3). "Unfortunately, we still do not...more
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Unfortunately, we still do not have a new law against domestic violence in Russia. And it seems our government is not interested in resolving this social issue. But we still have hope that Russian society will be able to lobby the government for resigning the current decriminalization law, especially after the recent developments in people’s attitude on this issue. In spring 2020, we passed another significant milestone in our movement against domestic violence. One of the most famous Russian TV hosts with 8.5 million followers on Instagram has participated in a few live interviews where she blamed women for becoming victims of domestic violence and for publicly speaking about it....more
July 14, 2021, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-LAW-2

"Before 2017 an abuser could be jailed up to 2 years in the case of reported domestic violence. After the new law passing, an abuser could be jailed up to 15 days or receive a fine of $70-$440 (5,000 – 30,000 RUB). If the number of reported cases for one abuser exceeds one case in a calendar year, then the abuser could be jailed up to 4 months or receive a fine of $580 (40,000 RUB)" (para 4). "Our movement against domestic violence got the most significant push in 2019 thereupon the Khachaturyan sisters’ case became public. A year before three sisters, 17, 18, and 19 years old had killed...more
June 30, 2021, 5:17 p.m.
Countries: Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"And since Kyrgyzstan has Central Asia’s highest rates of women’s labor emigration – women make up [40% of all Kyrgyz migrants in Russia], a much higher share than those from neighboring Tajikistan and Uzbekistan – migration would be a socially acceptable way to move somewhere where kidnapping is rare. Other researchers have hypothesized that Kyrgyz women migrate at such high rates because of their Russian language proficiency and Kyrgyzstan’s less restrictive gender norms. But bride kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan seems to play at least as critical a role in this trend..." (para 23-25).
June 30, 2021, 12:57 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"The brochure [issued by 'authorities in Russia's mostly Muslim-populated North Caucasus region of Ingushetia'] calls on Ingush girls 'to remember women's honorable place in Ingush society' and instructs 'a woman of any age to defer to a man of any age'... 'Women's beauty is shyness, politeness, a calm tone and keeping a distance from strangers. Women cannot shout and laugh loudly in public,' the brochure says" (para 6). "The instructions also say that people must step aside when a person who is at least one day older is walking toward them... 'Women stand up in the presence of men, showing respect to them no matter how old they are. Even...more