The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Saudi Arabia

Sept. 13, 2021, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mexico, Nigeria, Palestine, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Yemen
Variables: LRW-SCALE-12

6.0
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:13 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Iran, Jordan, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

“The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Iran, Jordan, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-2

“On family life, the interviews highlighted that the parents of all the study’s participants strongly valued learning and had high expectations of their daughters when it came to education, a factor that the women said influenced their study and career choices. The women also noted no incongruence between practicing religion and working in science, two actions that can be at odds in other cultures. In Muslim cultures, physics is seen as a subject that serves societal goals, such as advancing technology or saving humanity, which align with religious goals” (para 5).
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 6, 2021, 1:01 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Reports of east African workers being raped and tortured across the region and haunting videos of Kenyan women pleading for help after allegedly being abused by their employers saw the Kenyan government follow other countries such as Indonesia and the Philippines in banning its citizens from travelling to work in the Gulf in 2014. Since then the government has been grappling with how to allow women and the country’s economy to benefit from the huge demand for migrant domestic workers from countries such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar, while keeping those who want to travel for work safe" (para 7-8). "Paul Adhoch, the executive director of Trace Kenya, a Mombasa-based...more
Aug. 6, 2021, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Despite the Kenyan government’s claim that the Saudi government had agreed a minimum wage, workers still report to Adhoch that they are earning as little as 18 000 Kenyan shillings — if they get paid at all" (para 21). "Only a broken leg allowed Shani Hassan* to escape to Kenya when she took a job in Saudi Arabia just before the ban was put in place. She was allowed to sleep for only two hours a night, and given little more than noodles to eat. After more than a year of abuse, her employer’s son threw Hassan down the stairs, breaking her leg, leaving her unable to work. Finally, she...more
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Ten women's rights activists have gone on trial in Saudi Arabia, more than nine months after they were arrested in a crackdown on dissent. Loujain al-Hathloul, who campaigned for Saudi women to have the right to drive, was among prominent campaigners to appear before a judge in Riyadh on Wednesday...Last week, more than 30 countries criticised Saudi Arabia at the United Nations security council for detaining the women" (para 1-2, 4). "The outcry over the murder increased scrutiny of the detained women's rights activists, who also include Nouf Abdelaziz, Mayaa al-Zahrani, Samar Badawi, Nassima al-Saada, Shadan al-Onezi, Amal al-Harbi and Mohammed al-Rabia. They say some of the women, including Hathloul,...more
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"ALQST, a London-based Saudi rights group, said the women were charged under the kingdom's cybercrime law. The law stipulates prison sentences ranging from one to ten years. The accusations are related to human rights work and communications with 'hostile entities', ALQST said on Twitter. The status of legal representation was unclear. Rights groups have previously said the activists had no access to lawyers during more than nine months of detention and interrogation" (para 13-16).
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"The outcry over the murder increased scrutiny of the detained women's rights activists, who also include Nouf Abdelaziz, Mayaa al-Zahrani, Samar Badawi, Nassima al-Saada, Shadan al-Onezi, Amal al-Harbi and Mohammed al-Rabia. They say some of the women, including Hathloul, were held in solitary confinement and subjected to mistreatment and torture, including electric shocks, flogging and sexual assault. Saudi officials have denied those allegations. Hathloul, who had advocated an end to the driving ban and the kingdom's male guardianship system, was previously detained twice, including for 73 days in 2014 after she tried to drive into Saudi Arabia from the United Arab Emirates" (para 23-25).
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Activists and diplomats have speculated that the arrests may have been aimed at appeasing conservative elements opposed to the relaxation of social strictures. They may also have been meant as a message to activists not to push demands out of sync with the government's own agenda" (para 27-28).
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"At the time of the arrests, the public prosecutor said five men and four women were being held on suspicion of harming Saudi interests and offering support to hostile elements abroad. State-backed media labelled them as traitors and 'agents of embassies', unnerving foreign diplomats in the key US ally. Some of the women appeared in the courtroom together on Wednesday, but their cases appeared to be separate. Relatives were allowed to enter only for certain parts of the session. ALQST, a London-based Saudi rights group, said the women were charged under the kingdom's cybercrime law. The law stipulates prison sentences ranging from one to ten years. The accusations are related...more
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

"The women are among more than a dozen activists, including men, arrested in the weeks before a ban on women driving cars in the conservative kingdom was lifted" (para 7).
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"Ten women's rights activists have gone on trial in Saudi Arabia, more than nine months after they were arrested in a crackdown on dissent. Loujain al-Hathloul, who campaigned for Saudi women to have the right to drive, was among prominent campaigners to appear before a judge in Riyadh on Wednesday" (para 1-2). "Also appearing before a judge was Aziza al-Yousef, Eman al-Nafjan and Hatoon Al-Fassi, along with six others who were not identified. Court president Ibrahim al-Sayari announced the start of the trial to reporters and more than a dozen diplomats who were barred from attending the hearing, and cited privacy concerns for not making the trial public.The women are...more
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"At the time of the arrests, the public prosecutor said five men and four women were being held on suspicion of harming Saudi interests and offering support to hostile elements abroad. State-backed media labelled them as traitors and 'agents of embassies', unnerving foreign diplomats in the key US ally" (para 9-10).
July 30, 2021, 1:49 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Nafjan and Yousef participated in a protest against the driving ban in 2013. Yousef also authored a petition, which Nafjan and Hathloul signed, in 2016 seeking to end male guardianship, which requires women to obtain the consent of a male relative for major decisions" (para 26).
July 27, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"But in tandem with the reforms, the kingdom has seen a wave of arrests of women activists in recent months as it steps up a crack down on dissent" (para 18).
July 27, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"The country also faces criticism over its male guardianship system, which allows men to exercise arbitrary authority to make decisions on behalf of their female relatives" (para 19).
July 27, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1, RCDW-LAW-1

"Ultra-conservative Saudi Arabia has some of the world's toughest restrictions on women, who are required to wear the typically all-black garment in public. Powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said in March that wearing the robe was not mandatory in Islam, but in practice nothing changed and no formal edict to that effect was issued, meaning many women still feel forced to wear the garment" (para 3-4). "In an interview to CBS Television in March, the crown prince said: 'The laws are very clear and stipulated in the laws of Sharia: that women wear decent, respectful clothing, like men.' But, he added, this 'does not particularly specify a black abaya....more
July 27, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"The kingdom has also allowed women to enter sports stadiums, previously a male-only arena, and is pushing for greater participation of women in the workforce as it seeks to diversify its oil-dependent economy" (para 17).
July 27, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Saudi women have launched a social media protest against being forced to wear an all-in-one black robe by posting pictures and video of the conservative garment inside out. The rare protest has seen women posting pictures on social media wearing the body-shrouding robe, known as the abaya, the wrong way round in public" (para 1-2). "Using the hashtag 'inside-out abaya', dozens of women have posted pictures of flipped robes in a protest against the strict dress code. Activist Nora Abdulkarim tweeted this week: 'Because #Saudi feminists are endlessly creative, they've come up with new form of protest. 'They are posting pictures of (themselves) wearing their abayas inside-out in public as...more
July 27, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

"In June, women celebrated taking the wheel for the first time in decades as the kingdom overturned the world's only ban on female motorists. The kingdom has also allowed women to enter sports stadiums, previously a male-only arena..." (para 16-17).
July 21, 2021, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"Women in Saudi Arabia are now able to join the military as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman continues his efforts to modernise the kingdom" (Para 1). "It is now common to see women working as cashiers in shops, waiting tables and working in coffee houses, professions which were outlawed until recently" (Para 7). "The harsh crackdown against women who had pressed for the right to drive before the kingdom lifted the ban in mid-2018 came to symbolize the dual strategy of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman" (Para 19).
July 21, 2021, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"Women must also not marry a non Saudi citizen and have to possess a high school education to be eligible to sign up" (Para 7). "But in spite of the reforms which allow women to work, drive and travel independently, women's rights are still a major issue amid a recent crackdown on dissenters" (Para 8).
July 21, 2021, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

"But in spite of the reforms which allow women to work, drive and travel independently, women's rights are still a major issue amid a recent crackdown on dissenters" (Para 8). "The harsh crackdown against women who had pressed for the right to drive before the kingdom lifted the ban in mid-2018 came to symbolize the dual strategy of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman" (Para 19).
July 21, 2021, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"Earlier this month, one of Saudi Arabia's most prominent political activists was released from prison after serving nearly three years on charges that sparked an international uproar over the kingdom's human rights record. Loujain al-Hathloul, who pushed to end a ban on women driving in Saudi Arabia, was arrested in 2018 and sentenced to almost six years in prison last December under a broad counterterrorism law. Louijain was held for 1001 days, with time in pre-trial detention and solitary confinement" (Para 9-10, 13). "Human rights lawyer Baroness Helena Kennedy previously wrote in a report that women's rights activists including Loujain were forced to kiss and perform sex acts on their...more
July 21, 2021, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: EWCMS-LAW-1

"Women in Saudi Arabia are now able to join the military as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman continues his efforts to modernise the kingdom. Military roles in the army, air force, navy, missile force and armed medical services will now be open to women. They will be able to join at any rank between soldier and sergeant if they are aged between 21 and 40 and have no criminal convictions. Women must also not marry a non Saudi citizen and have to possess a high school education to be eligible to sign up" (Para 1-4).
July 21, 2021, 10:44 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The hashtags 'Save Sabah al-Qahtani' and 'Sabah al-Qahtani is in danger' have been widely circulated this week, after images were released of Qahtani in hospital with visible marks of apparent abuse on her body" (Para 4). "Hashtags on social media that attempt to save women from domestic violence have become routine in Saudi Arabia. In just the past week, the hashtag 'save Rose' was trending with reports of a young girl being subjected to violence from her father, who allegedly stopped her from studying and threatened her life. Prior to that, the hashtag 'justice for Hadil al-Harthi' was circulating, after Harthi was reportedly stabbed to death by her brother. Now,...more
July 21, 2021, 10:44 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

"Sabah al-Qahtani, 36, was said to have been the victim of domestic abuse after she was violently forced by her siblings to sign a document dividing their inheritance" (Para 2).
July 21, 2021, 10:44 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"In just the past week, the hashtag 'save Rose' was trending with reports of a young girl being subjected to violence from her father, who allegedly stopped her from studying and threatened her life" (Para 10).
July 21, 2021, 10:44 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"In what has become a haunting pattern in Saudi Arabia, hashtags circulating on social media are calling for the life of a woman, allegedly subjected to domestic violence, to be saved. Sabah al-Qahtani, 36, was said to have been the victim of domestic abuse after she was violently forced by her siblings to sign a document dividing their inheritance. Qahtani allegedly fainted as a result of being beaten, and was admitted to hospital by her siblings on the pretext that she had attempted to commit suicide" (Para 1-3). "The report said that a woman in her 30s had been admitted to hospital as a result of attempted self-harm through the...more