The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for South Korea

Nov. 18, 2021, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: EWCMS-PRACTICE-2

"South Korean society has long understood the need to address widespread gender bias, but women in the armed forces are seen as particularly vulnerable. The country’s 550,000-member military is considered one of its most hierarchical, male-dominant and paternalistic institutions, and former soldiers say women are treated as playthings rather than colleagues" (Para 8). "'It’s the male-dominant military culture that doesn’t treat female soldiers as colleagues that killed my daughter,' he said in an interview. 'It’s the military culture that ostracizes the victim of sexual crime, not the predator, that killed my daughter'" (Para 11). "'They want their female subordinates to be there to act as ‘flowers,’ serving drinks,' said Bang...more
Nov. 18, 2021, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: EWCMS-LAW-1

"Even as the country tries to recruit more women amid a shortage of male conscripts" (Para 2).
Nov. 18, 2021, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: SUICIDE-DATA-1

"When Ms. Lee reported that Mr. Chang kissed and groped her in the car that night, her superiors tried to bury the complaint, according to Defense Ministry investigators. The ​military did not bring formal charges against Mr. Chang until after Ms. Lee, 23, took her own life on May 21. Mr. Chang has since admitted to the assault and is facing trial" (Para 3)."It has become what some say is a pattern​ in South Korea​: One female​​ ​soldier after another has taken ​her own life ​in recent years after they reported being sexually assaulted in the military. Hundreds of sexual assaults are reported every year. At least four female victims...more
Nov. 18, 2021, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: EWCMS-DATA-3

"The military has since arrested both bosses on charges of trying to coerce Ms. Lee into silence. The air force senior master sergeant died by suicide in July while in military custody. The warrant officer has denied all charges against him. Gen. Lee Seong-yong, the air force’s chief of staff, has stepped down" (Para 14). "More than 400 cases of sexual assault between soldiers have been reported annually from 2017 to 2020 in South Korea, according to data submitted to Kwon In-sook, a female lawmaker. Less than 40 percent of the accused have faced charges, and nearly 43 percent of those charged walked free after receiving suspended prison sentences" (Para...more
Nov. 18, 2021, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: EWCMS-PRACTICE-3

"The soldiers were driving back to the South Korean air force base after dinner and drinks on March 2. In the back seat, Master Sgt. Lee Ye-ram could be heard repeatedly begging her male colleague​, Master Sgt. Chang Dong-hoon, to stop sexually assaulting her. 'Can you please stop ​it,' she said, according to the conversation recorded by the car’s dashboard camera. What came after was the latest example of South Korea’s persistent struggle to rid its military of sex crimes​" (Para 1-2). "When Ms. Lee reported that Mr. Chang kissed and groped her in the car that night, her superiors tried to bury the complaint, according to Defense Ministry investigators....more
Nov. 18, 2021, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: EWCMS-LAW-5

"The deaths have forced South Korea’s military to accept some long-delayed reforms. In August, the public uproar incited by Ms. Lee’s suicide prompted the National Assembly to revise a law stipulating that all sex crimes be investigated by the national police and tried in civilian courts as opposed to courts-martial. The move was meant to increase transparency and protect victims, but victims and their families say it is the military itself that needs to change" (Para 5). "Mr. Chang apologized to Ms. Lee’s family ​during a trial that began in August. Prosecutors have asked the court to sentence him to 15 years in prison" (Para 27).
Nov. 18, 2021, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: EWCMS-DATA-2

"Hundreds of sexual assaults are reported every year" (Para 4). "The issue attracted national attention in 2013 when an army captain died by suicide after being abused by her boss. 'I don’t want to die' were some of her last words, said Kang Suk-min, the family’s former lawyer. After the captain’s death, her father said he hoped that South Korea would 'never again have to see another female soldier die like my daughter'" (Para 9). "More than 400 cases of sexual assault between soldiers have been reported annually from 2017 to 2020 in South Korea, according to data submitted to Kwon In-sook, a female lawmaker" (Para 15). "Much of the...more
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"There were no reported cases of forced marriage"(22).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"The law criminalizes rape[...] Rape is defined in law as involving the use of violence"(18)."The law obligates companies and organizations to take preventive measures against sexual harassment. Under antibullying laws introduced in July, in certain cases failure to take appropriate action may result in fines or jail time[...]The KNPA classifies sexual harassment as 'indecent acts by compulsion'"(20)."The age of consent is 13. It is illegal to deceive or pressure anyone younger than 19 into having sexual intercourse. In July[2019] a law went into effect penalizing adults who have sexual intercourse with teenagers between ages 13 and 16 by taking advantage of mental, physical, or financial difficulties, regardless of whether the...more
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Children, especially runaway girls, were vulnerable to sex trafficking, including through online recruitment"(23).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-DATA-1

"On average, women earned only 63 percent of what men earned, and a higher percentage of women filled lower-paying, low-skilled, contract jobs. Women often faced difficulties returning to the workforce after childbirth"(30).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Domestic violence remained a significant and underreported problem according to NGOs. According to KNPA statistics, in 2018 248,660 cases of domestic violence were reported, an 11-percent decrease from 2017. Reports of violence among unmarried couples, called “dating violence,” doubled from 2016 (9,364 cases) to 2018 (18,961 cases)"(19)."According to a survey by the NHRCK, 42 percent of foreign-born brides have experienced domestic violence and 68 percent had experienced unwanted sexual advances. Domestic violence among native South Korean couples is high in general but probably somewhat lower than among mixed couples"(19).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"In March 2018, in response to the #MeToo movement, MOGEF created the Special Center for Reporting Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault. The ministry funded 170 counseling centers (called “sunflower centers”) nationwide for victims of sexual violence, providing counseling, medical care and therapy, caseworkers, and legal assistance"(20).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LBHO-LAW-1

"No laws prevent women or members of minorities from voting, running for office, serving as electoral monitors, or otherwise participating in political life, and they did so"(15).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-1

"In January, President Moon described the gender gap as a “shameful reality” and pledged to address it. Moon has generally kept his pledge from the beginning of his term that 30 percent of his cabinet nominations would be women"(21).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"Women enjoy the same legal rights under the constitution as men"(21).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"The penalty for rape ranges from a minimum of three years to life imprisonment depending on the specific circumstances"(18)."The law allows judges or an MOJ committee to sentence repeat sex offenders to“chemical castration,” where sex offenders undergo drug treatment designed to diminish sexual urges. The law was enacted to protect children against an increasing number of reported sex crimes. The ministry reported that one such procedure was conducted between January and July[2019]"(18).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ABO-DATA-1

"There were no reports of coerced abortion or involuntary sterilization"(21).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"The law criminalizes rape; although no specific statute defines spousal rape as illegal, the Supreme Court acknowledged marital rape as illegal"(18)."When there is a danger of domestic violence recurring and an immediate need for protection, the law allows a provisional order to be issued ex officio or at the victim’s request. This may restrict the subject of the order from living in the same home, approaching within 109 yards of the victim, or contacting the victim through telecommunication devices"(18).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The minimum legal age for men and women to marry is 18"(22).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"In August[2019] a district court upheld a professor’s six-month prison sentence for defamation after he told his class that some women “probably knew exactly what they were signing up for” when they “volunteered” to be comfort women (women subjected to sexual servitude for the Japanese military during World War II). The court also upheld Sunchon National University’s decision to fire him"(8)."Because a rape conviction requires proving that violence was used, and because the country’s defamation laws allow countersuits by alleged perpetrators, rape offenses are underreported and under prosecuted"(18). "In February the Seoul High Court overruled a lower court’s August 2018 acquittal of Ahn Hee-jung, former governor of South Chuncheong. The...more
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"The law requires equal pay for equal work. The government’s Sixth Basic Plan on Equal Employment and Work-Life Balance provides a roadmap for a policy on women’s employment that consists of three pillars: creating nondiscriminatory working environments, preventing interruptions in women’s careers, and providing re-employment for “career-interrupted” women"(30).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In August[2019] a district court upheld a professor’s six-month prison sentence for defamation after he told his class that some women “probably knew exactly what they were signing up for” when they “volunteered” to be comfort women (women subjected to sexual servitude for the Japanese military during World War II). The court also upheld Sunchon National University’s decision to fire him"(8).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"In June[2019] police arrested a man after he beat his foreign-born wife for three hours in front of their two-year-old child. A video clip of the assault was widely viewed on the internet, sparking a national debate about foreign brides and rural municipal governments offering subsidies (intended to stem rural population decline) to bring them to the country"(19).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DV-LAW-2

"The law defines domestic violence as a serious crime and authorizes courts to order offenders to stay away from victims for up to six months. This restraining order may be extended up to two years. Offenders may be sentenced to a maximum of five years in prison and fined up to seven million won ($5,810) for domestic violence offenses. Noncompliance with domestic violence restraining orders may result in a maximum sentence of two years in prison and a fine of up to 20 million won ($16,600)"(18)."In August, in response to violence against migrant brides, the MOJ announced new regulatory measures to prevent abuses. These included a “one strike” policy that...more
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"Data from the Supreme Prosecutor’s Office showed that nearly 40 percent of victims of sex crimes were between 21 and 30 years old. Approximately 21 percent of victims were between 16 and 20 years old"(19)."There were 241,343 reported cases of sexual violence in 2018 (an increase of 33.7 percent since 2017), according to Statistics Korea, a government agency"(20).
Nov. 11, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: PRN-LAW-1

"The law prohibits the commercialization of child pornography. Offenders convicted of producing or possessing child pornography materials for the purpose of selling, leasing, or distributing for profit are subject to a maximum of seven years’ imprisonment. In addition anyone who possesses child pornography may be fined up to 20 million won ($16,600)"(22).
Sept. 13, 2021, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan, Belgium, Benin, D R Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Luxembourg, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Namibia, Nepal, Rwanda, Senegal, South Korea, South Sudan, Taiwan, Turkmenistan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
Variables: LRW-SCALE-12

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July 9, 2021, 7:11 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"The gender inequality problem in South Korea is deep-rooted, as evidenced by strong pushback from those who do not believe in feminism. Some men in South Korea do not support gender equality and go further to argue that 'feminism is no longer about gender equality. It is gender discrimination and its manner is violent and hateful.' They also think that feminism and gender discrimination may be applicable to women in their 40s or 50s but not for women in their 20s or 30s" (para 9).
July 9, 2021, 7:11 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"South Korea has a shiny side that it wants to proudly show the world: K-pop, K-quarantine during COVID-19, hi-tech industries. But what it is less keen to show are the areas where it catastrophically fails. South Korean society does not know how to protect or treat women as equals to men and as valuable and indispensable entities of society. Rather, South Korean women, myself included, live in a country that views women as objects —beautiful things whose sole function is bearing children. This is not just a societal construct, this is unabashed discrimination against women that is encouraged by my government. For example, in January 2021, the Seoul city government...more