The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Turkey

June 11, 2021, 10:48 a.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: ATC-DATA-3

"Reservations: 'With respect to article 29, paragraph 1: In pursuance of article 29, paragraph 2 of the Convention, the Government of the Republic of Turkey declares that it does not consider itself bound by paragraph 1 of this article'" (para 74).
June 7, 2021, 1:53 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: ATC-DATA-3

"Turkey had originally made a reservation against Article 15, paragraphs 2 and 4; Article 16, paragraphs 1 (c), (d), (f) and (g) as well as to Article 29, paragraph 1. On 20 September 1999, the government of Turkey withdrew the reservation against Article 15, paragraphs 2 and 4; Article 16, paragraphs 1 (c), (d), (f) and (g), only maintaining the reservation to Article 29, and declared a possible conflict between Article 9 and the Turkish Law on Nationality" (177-178).
May 28, 2021, 11:34 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: PW-DATA-1

"Just in the town of Kilis, with its population of 230,000, at least 5,000 religious ceremonies have been performed outside the courts between 2011 and 2014, wedding already married Turkish and Syrian men to Syrian women, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights" (para 4).
May 24, 2021, 2:10 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"In 2020, 98% of births in Turkey were attended by skilled health personnele" (p 49).
May 24, 2021, 2:07 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"From 2010-2018 the density of nursing and midwifery personnel in Turkey was 27.1 per 10,000 population" (p 64).
May 24, 2021, 2:06 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"From 2010-2018 the density of nursing and midwifery personnel in Turkey was 27.1 per 10,000 population" (p 64).
May 24, 2021, 1:55 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MISA-DATA-1

In 2016, the prevalence of anaemia in women of reporducticve age (15-49 years) in Turkey was 30.9% (p 72).
April 19, 2021, 4:21 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Palestine, Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-2

3.0
April 19, 2021, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Suriname, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-SCALE-3

2.0
April 19, 2021, 3:54 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, D R Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, North Korea, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Rwanda, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-SCALE-2

0.0more
April 7, 2021, 10:31 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"In 2020, 98% of births in Turkey were attended by skilled health personnele" (p 49).
April 7, 2021, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: DACH-DATA-1

"In 2016, the life expectancy at birth in Turkey was 73.3 years for males and 79.4 years for females" (p 46).
April 2, 2021, 9:47 a.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: IM-DATA-1

"In 2018, the under-five mortality rate in Turkey was 11 per 1000 live births" (p 49).
March 31, 2021, 3:37 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MMR-SCALE-1

"In 2017, the maternal mortality ratio for women in Turkey was 17 per 100,000 live births" (p 49).
March 31, 2021, 3:22 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MMR-DATA-1

"In 2017, the maternal mortality ratio for women in Turkey was 17 per 100,000 live births" (p 49).
March 30, 2021, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MMR-DATA-1

"In 2020 the maternal mortality ratio for women in Turkey was 17 per 100,000 live births" (p 49).
March 30, 2021, 7:36 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"From 2010-2017 in Turkey the proportion of ever-partnered women and girls aged 15-49 years subjected to physical and/or sexual violence by a current or former intimate partner in the previous 12 months was 11%" (p 72).
March 30, 2021, 7:31 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: DACH-DATA-3

"From 2010-2019 the proportion of women in Turkey of reproductive age who have their need for family planning satified with modern methods is 60.1%" (p 56).
March 19, 2021, 3:56 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The adolescent birth rate from 2010-2018 in Turkey is 20.9 per 1000 women aged 15-19 years" (p 56).
March 8, 2021, 9:44 a.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Cuba, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Georgia, Ghana, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Lithuania, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Suriname, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

3.0
March 5, 2021, 7:25 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: PW-LAW-1

"Three Muslim-majority countries that have outlawed the practice of polygamy are Azerbaijan, Tunisia, and Turkey. Like other countries that have placed a total ban on polygamy, Turkey and Azerbaijan have abolished the practice based on secular justifications... Turkey abolished polygamy in when it implemented its secular Turkish Civil Code in 1926" (10).
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-DATA-1

“Yazgül Yılmaz v. Turkey (1 February 2011): In this case the applicant complained that, at the age of 16, she was sexually harassed while in police detention. She was given a gynaecological examination – unaccompanied and without her or her guardian’s consent – to verify whether her hymen had been broken. After being acquitted and released, she suffered from post-traumatic stress and depression. Her allegations of assault in custody were largely corroborated by subsequent medical examinations. No disciplinary proceedings were brought against the prison doctors concerned. The Court noted that that the law at that time did not provide the necessary safeguards concerning examinations of female detainees and that additional...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

“İzci v. Turkey (23 July 2013): This case concerned a Turkish woman who complained in particular that she had been attacked by the police following her participation in a peaceful demonstration to celebrate Women’s Day in Istanbul and that such police brutality in Turkey was tolerated and often went unpunished. The Court held that there had been a violation of Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment) of the Convention both in its substantive and procedural aspect, and a violation of Article 11 (freedom of assembly) of the Convention. It considered in particular that, as in many previous cases against Turkey, the police officers had failed to show a...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

“Juhnke v. Turkey (22 July 2003): The applicant was arrested on suspicion of membership of an illegal armed organisation, the PKK (Workers’ Party of Kurdistan) and later convicted as charged and sentenced to 15 years’ imprisonment. She complained in particular that, during her detention, she had been subjected to ill-treatment and a gynaecological examination against her will. The European Court of Human Rights, finding that there was no evidence to substantiate the applicant’s allegation that she had been subjected to ill-treatment, declared that part of her complaint inadmissible as being manifestly ill-founded. The Court further found the applicant’s allegation that she had been forced to have a gynaecological examination to...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1, MURDER-DATA-1, MURDER-DATA-2, DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-2, DV-LAW-2

“Opuz v. Turkey (9 June 2009): The applicant and her mother were assaulted and threatened over many years by the applicant’s husband H.O., at various points leaving both women with life-threatening injuries. With only one exception, no prosecution was brought against him on the grounds that both women had withdrawn their complaints, despite their explanations that H.O. had harassed them into doing so, threatening to kill them. He subsequently stabbed his wife seven times and was given a fine equivalent to about 385 euros, payable in instalments. The two women filed numerous complaints, claiming their lives were in danger. H.O. was questioned and released. Finally, when the two women were...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2

“Opuz v. Turkey (9 June 2009): The applicant and her mother were assaulted and threatened over many years by the applicant’s husband H.O., at various points leaving both women with life-threatening injuries. With only one exception, no prosecution was brought against him on the grounds that both women had withdrawn their complaints, despite their explanations that H.O. had harassed them into doing so, threatening to kill them. He subsequently stabbed his wife seven times and was given a fine equivalent to about 385 euros, payable in instalments. The two women filed numerous complaints, claiming their lives were in danger. H.O. was questioned and released. Finally, when the two women were...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

“Yazgül Yılmaz v. Turkey (1 February 2011): In this case the applicant complained that, at the age of 16, she was sexually harassed while in police detention. She was given a gynaecological examination – unaccompanied and without her or her guardian’s consent – to verify whether her hymen had been broken. After being acquitted and released, she suffered from post-traumatic stress and depression. Her allegations of assault in custody were largely corroborated by subsequent medical examinations. No disciplinary proceedings were brought against the prison doctors concerned. The Court noted that that the law at that time did not provide the necessary safeguards concerning examinations of female detainees and that additional...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

“Aydın v. Turkey (25 September 1997): The applicant, a young Turkish woman of Kurdish origin (aged 17 at the relevant time) was arrested without explanation and taken, along with two other members of her family, into custody. She was blindfolded, beaten, stripped naked, placed in a tyre and hosed with pressurised water before being raped by a member of the security forces and then again beaten for about an hour by several people. A subsequent medical examination by a doctor, who had never before dealt with a rape case, found her hymen torn and widespread bruising on her thighs. The applicant further claimed that the family was intimidated and harassed...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

“Juhnke v. Turkey (22 July 2003): The applicant was arrested on suspicion of membership of an illegal armed organisation, the PKK (Workers’ Party of Kurdistan) and later convicted as charged and sentenced to 15 years’ imprisonment. She complained in particular that, during her detention, she had been subjected to ill-treatment and a gynaecological examination against her will. The European Court of Human Rights, finding that there was no evidence to substantiate the applicant’s allegation that she had been subjected to ill-treatment, declared that part of her complaint inadmissible as being manifestly ill-founded. The Court further found the applicant’s allegation that she had been forced to have a gynaecological examination to...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 9:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: DV-DATA-1

“Opuz v. Turkey (9 June 2009): The applicant and her mother were assaulted and threatened over many years by the applicant’s husband H.O., at various points leaving both women with life-threatening injuries. With only one exception, no prosecution was brought against him on the grounds that both women had withdrawn their complaints, despite their explanations that H.O. had harassed them into doing so, threatening to kill them. He subsequently stabbed his wife seven times and was given a fine equivalent to about 385 euros, payable in instalments. The two women filed numerous complaints, claiming their lives were in danger. H.O. was questioned and released. Finally, when the two women were...more