The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for United States

Jan. 26, 2022, 5:25 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Latvia, Lesotho, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad/Tobago, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela
Variables: IIP-SCALE-1

1.0
Oct. 4, 2021, 9:37 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: EWCMS-PRACTICE-3

"On Dec. 8, 2020, Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy suspended or fired 14 military leaders for failing to adequately prevent, stop, or intervene in a culture of sexual assault and violence at Fort Hood Army base. This was necessary, but nowhere near sufficient. The new secretary of defense in the Biden administration, Lloyd J. Austin III, has taken steps at the start of his service in this role to explore changes to the military’s handling of sexual and gender-based violence. The investigation that led to these actions was prompted by a public outcry after the killing of Vanessa Guillén, a 20-year-old soldier at Fort Hood, by another soldier on the base....more
Oct. 4, 2021, 9:37 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: EWCMS-LAW-5

"As chair of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, President Joe Biden spearheaded the passage of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), based on decades of anti-violence advocacy led by women’s movements. The new presidential administration needs to take action now and demand changes to culture, policy, and practice around sexual harassment, assault, and other violence within military settings. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand introduced the Military Justice Improvement Act (MJIA) in 2013 to reform reporting policies for sexual violence in military settings. This bill, or adoption of similar reforms, has yet to be passed. The new administration and DoD leadership should elevate implementation of recommendations to end gender-based violence and its...more
Oct. 4, 2021, 9:37 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1, EWCMS-DATA-3

"On Dec. 8, 2020, Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy suspended or fired 14 military leaders for failing to adequately prevent, stop, or intervene in a culture of sexual assault and violence at Fort Hood Army base. This was necessary, but nowhere near sufficient. The new secretary of defense in the Biden administration, Lloyd J. Austin III, has taken steps at the start of his service in this role to explore changes to the military’s handling of sexual and gender-based violence" (para 1-2).
Oct. 4, 2021, 9:37 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: EWCMS-DATA-2

"Fort Hood is not alone in failing to protect military members from gender-based violence. Such violence, which includes sexual assault and sexual harassment, is prevalent throughout society and prominent in military settings, which are by nature male-dominated and patriarchal. One in three women veterans receiving care from the Veterans Health Administration report having experienced sexual assault or harassment while serving in the military. The Fiscal Year 2019 Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military found a 3 percent increase in sexual assault reports by service members over the previous year, with the overwhelming majority of reports from women service members, and the highest rates among those...more
Oct. 4, 2021, 9:37 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: EWCMS-DATA-1

"A 2020 Government Accountability Office report found that women service members are 28 times more likely to separate from military service than their male peers, forfeiting career advancement, leadership opportunities and full retirement benefits, citing sexual assault as a key factor in the separation. Other research has also found premature separation from military service — with loss of benefits and achievement of goals — resulting from experience of gender-based violence during service" (para 9).
Oct. 4, 2021, 9:37 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: SUICIDE-DATA-1

"Gender-based violence is a major contributor to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suicide, and other mental health and social issues among military service members and veterans" (para 7).
Sept. 13, 2021, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Rep, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Cyprus, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Fiji, Finland, Gambia, Georgia, Greece, Guyana, India, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Liberia, Lithuania, Malawi, Malta, Mongolia, Mozambique, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zambia
Variables: LRW-SCALE-12

1.0
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:04 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ASR-DATA-1

"...For example, in the US, women make up 21% of undergraduates and 20% of Ph.D.s [6]…" (para 2)
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Canada, United States
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Many groups have studied the physics-gender-gap problem, identifying a number of possible causes. For example, researchers have reported both subtle and blatant stereotyping of women in physics laboratories in the US, Canada, and Europe and have shown that such stereotyping negatively impacted women’s careers [5] (see also Viewpoint: How Stereotypes Impact Women in Physics). That study and others all focused on western countries, where physics is a man-dominated field..." (para 2).
Aug. 5, 2021, 10:20 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ABO-LAW-1

Amidst an onslaught of harsh anti-abortion laws in US state legislatures, Tennessee legislators have introduced a bill that would give the biological father of a fetus a veto on an abortion procedure.
July 29, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"Outcry was swift — including from the press, an attorney who has worked with minors seeking to marry in the state, advocates and local officials. After intense bipartisan negotiations, the bill was amended yet again to raise the age floor for marriage to 16, and that version of the bill passed without opposition in the Senate. While this version still falls short of the age of 18 standard that was initially proposed — a deeply disappointing development that leaves children at risk — I remain hopeful. Until recently, New York law permitted marriage as young as 14, and the first successful legislative effort to address this was able to increase...more
July 29, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"I grew up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, not far from Mr. Reisinger’s office. I remember classmates in my hometown getting pregnant, marrying and dropping out of school as early as middle school, never to return to class. In high school, I was a maid of honor in a wedding that the bride later described as the worst day of her life" (Para 12). "Married girls are 50 percent more likely to drop out of high school and much less likely to finish college" (Para 13).
July 29, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LRW-LAW-1, DV-DATA-1

"She’s not alone: Our national review of research comparing different health, economic, educational and violence outcomes for child brides found that marriage is not protective for girls, even single mothers. Our synthesis also showed that child marriages are more likely to result in divorce. Married girls are 50 percent more likely to drop out of high school and much less likely to finish college. Our review found that rates of domestic violence, poverty, early pregnancy and the likelihood of negative physical and mental health outcomes also increase. Further, 57 percent of the marriage applications we collected involving children under 16 showed age differences that would have amounted to a felony...more
July 29, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Worse, North Carolina seems to be attracting child marriage tourism as Kentucky and other nearby states improve their laws. 'We’re becoming a sanctuary state for statutory rape,' a county official, Drew Reisinger, told me after refusing to grant a marriage license to a Kentucky couple who could not get one in their home state. The man was 49; the girl, 17" (Para 11).
July 29, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AOM-DATA-2

"This sense of exceptionalism has left this issue understudied. In a 2017 investigation, PBS’s 'Frontline' could not access data from six states — mine included — on how often child marriage occurs or among whom" (Para 7). "Last year, my organization, the International Center for Research on Women, compiled the first-ever comprehensive child-marriage estimates for North Carolina and found that thousands of adults have been granted licenses to marry children in the state. This research was our first investigation of child marriage in the United States, after over a decade of work on this issue around the world, where approximately 12 million girls marry below the age of 18 each...more
July 29, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"Except they haven’t. Almost 260 years later, North Carolina still allows pregnant and parenting children to marry as young as 14 with a court order, sometimes in direct opposition to a state statutory rape law, which criminalizes sex with a person age 15 or under, with few exceptions. The state’s House of Representatives is considering a bill, which would increase the minimum age of marriage to 16 and cap age gaps with 16- or 17-year-old spouses at four years. The bill that was originally introduced would have set the marriage age at 18, with no exceptions, but the process of getting even this far has been fraught and revealed surprising...more
July 29, 2021, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"'When we first filed this bill, one of the things we were looking at is the fact that North Carolina has become a destination place for marriage — for folks who are marrying children and for sex trafficking,' Sen. Danny Britt said. 'What we wanted to do was come up with a bill that would take us off that list and protect these children'" (Para 3).
July 29, 2021, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"'The amendment lines up with what our current statutory rape laws are,' Britt said. 'So essentially, what we were allowing as a state was the offense of statutory rape to occur so long as you were married'" (Para 9).
July 29, 2021, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ABO-DATA-1

"Britt said another concern he had was that teens would abort their children instead of having a baby out of wedlock" (Para 10).
July 29, 2021, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"'The data shows that the overwhelming majority of child marriages result in kids dropping out of school, losing housing, and facing lifelong physical and emotional abuse,' Puryear said" (Para 19).
July 29, 2021, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"Senators walked back a proposed bill that would ban child marriages in North Carolina, but amended it to match the state’s laws on statutory rape. Senate Bill 35, in its original form, would have banned anyone under 18 from marrying" (Para 1-2). "North Carolina is one of two states, Alaska being the other, that allows children as young as 14 to marry" (Para 5). "Under Britt’s amendment, children as young as 14 can still marry, but only someone four years older or less. The marriage would need to be approved by a parent or guardian with written notice given to the clerk of court, unless the minor is emancipated. The...more
July 29, 2021, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"'When we first filed this bill, one of the things we were looking at is the fact that North Carolina has become a destination place for marriage — for folks who are marrying children and for sex trafficking,' Sen. Danny Britt said. 'What we wanted to do was come up with a bill that would take us off that list and protect these children.'” (Para 3).
July 20, 2021, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: GIC-LAW-1

"The UNICEF report noted that among the 31 wealthy nations it studied, the United States was the only country that has no national paid leave policy for mothers or fathers." (Para 13)
July 7, 2021, 11:40 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AW-PRACTICE-1

"Saudi activists who have successfully fled political persecution in the kingdom do not advise women to flee as a first option, warning that women who run away without a clear plan in place are vulnerable to various kinds of abuse. Often the Saudi women who run away are young and inexperienced, further complicating their ability to navigate lengthy and complex asylum processes. Two young Saudi sisters found dead in New York last year had sought asylum in the U.S., according to detectives. They'd maxed out the older sister's credit card before their bodies were found along the rocky banks of the Hudson River wrapped together with tape. Police did not...more
July 1, 2021, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"Forty-three other states and the District of Columbia have legislation that offers at least some protection to prevent rape victims from facing their attackers over parental rights; eight of those laws were just adopted in 2016" (para 5).
July 1, 2021, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-3, CUST-LAW-1

"Seven states don’t have any laws preventing a rapist from claiming parental rights, but that’s not to say that these states are oblivious to the issue. Maryland, for one, has been working for years to pass a law that would allow a rape victim to terminate her attacker’s parental rights. Forty-three other states and the District of Columbia have legislation that offers at least some protection to prevent rape victims from facing their attackers over parental rights; eight of those laws were just adopted in 2016. But these legislative protections vary greatly. In 20 states and D.C., a rape conviction is required before a victim can request termination of parental...more
July 1, 2021, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"There are also exceptions, called 'carve-outs,' to consider. Some states may not apply these parental rights [for rapists] laws if, say, the person convicted of sexual assault is the spouse of the victim at the time of the attack or if they were cohabiting after the assault" (para 10).
July 1, 2021, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-DATA-1

"Between 2005 and 2010, just 36% of the nearly 300,000 annual average rape or sexual assault victimizations were reported to police, the [B]ureau [of Justice Statistics] reports. Even when you look at both reported and unreported rapes during that time period, roughly 12% of victimizations resulted in arrests" (para 8).
July 1, 2021, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: INFIB-DATA-2

"Washington is the state with the highest number of women and girls estimated to be at risk or to have undergone the practice that still lacks a state-level FGM ban. The Population Reference Bureau estimates 25,000 women and girls in the state are at risk" (para 22).