The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for AFE-PRACTICE-1

Jan. 13, 2022, 10:29 a.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"While the law provides pregnant girls the right to continue their education until after giving birth, NGOs reported schools often did not respect this right. School executives sometimes expelled pregnant girls or transferred them to other schools.Media outlets reported a significant number of girls failed to sit for their final secondary school examinations due to pregnancy"(39).
Jan. 6, 2022, 12:09 p.m.
Countries: Somalia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The societal attitudes concerning whether a university education is more important for a boy than a girl depends on the city or village you are in. Girls are enrolled at times at a much higher rate than boys in the capital and other major cities in Somalia, because boys are expected to earn income. However, if you were to go to certain villages the societal attitudes would be quite different. Girls are married off early and have a family at the age of 18 already" (1).
Dec. 17, 2021, 6:27 p.m.
Countries: Cote D'Ivoire
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Educational participation of girls was lower than that of boys, particularly in rural areas. Although girls enrolled at a higher rate, their participation rates dropped below that of boys because of the tendency to keep girls at home to do domestic work or care for younger siblings and due to widespread sexual harassment of female students by teachers and other staff" (20-21).
Dec. 16, 2021, 11:23 p.m.
Countries: Hungary
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The law provides for the same legal status and rights for women as for men. According to the Economist’s 2018 glass ceiling index, women held 14.5 percent of the members of company boards, based on 2017 data. Women’s rights organizations asserted that Romani women could suffer multiple forms of discrimination on the basis of gender, ethnicity, and class, and experienced barriers to equal access in education, health care, housing, employment, and justice" (26).
Nov. 30, 2021, 2:34 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"According to press and NGO reports, in some instances teachers in Hamas-run schools in Gaza sent girls home for not wearing conservative attire, although enforcement was not systematic" (96).
Nov. 30, 2021, 2:33 p.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Jewish schoolgirls continued to be denied admission to ultra-Orthodox schools based on their Mizrahi ethnicity (those with ancestry from North Africa or the Middle East) despite a 2009 court ruling prohibiting ethnic segregation between Mizrahi and Ashkenazi schoolgirls, according to the NGO Noar Kahalacha" (38).
Nov. 9, 2021, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"[T]he government took important positive steps to expand girls’ access to education, including by providing conditional cash transfers to incentivize poor families to continue education for their daughters" (56).
Nov. 3, 2021, 9:35 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Corporal punishment is prohibited in schools in article 39 of the Education Act (2008) but it continues to be used. In research in government schools in 2008, children were punished – mostly commonly by being beaten with a stick – in 100% of observed classes in boys’ schools and 20% in girls’ schools; children were often authorised to beat other children; the level of physical punishment has reportedly fallen since prohibition" (2, 3).
Nov. 3, 2021, 9:32 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Because security is still a problem in Afghanistan, families are unwilling to send their children far outside their villages to receive education. Even families fortunate enough to have automobile transportation still fear sending their children, particularly their daughters, away from the village to go to school" (5, 8). "When educational and higher educational opportunity is concentrated in larger cities, the graduating professionals are generally unwilling to take their degrees and move to rural villages to teach. Afghanistan already has a shortage of female teachers, and getting the few graduates to teach in the countryside is challenging. By developing greater educational systems in rural areas, the Government of Afghanistan can begin...more
Oct. 25, 2021, 2:40 p.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Authorities did not always enforce required attendance laws or enforce them equally for boys and girls, especially in rural areas, where government and family budgets for education were limited and children’s labor in agriculture was valuable. Gender gaps in education declined, but certain gaps remained. There were substantial differences in the education profile of men and women at the postsecondary level, notably in applied technology programs" (31).
Oct. 15, 2021, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Women in Qatar are living under a system of 'deep discrimination' – dependent on men for permission to marry, travel, pursue higher education or make decisions about their own children, according to a new report" (para 1). "Women interviewed for the report described how their guardians denied them permission to drive, travel, study, work or marry someone of their own choosing. Some spoke of how this had affected their mental health, contributing to self-harm, depression, stress and suicidal thoughts" (para 5).
Sept. 29, 2021, 9:33 a.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The law does not prohibit sexual harassment, which routinely occurred, including in schools, without any government efforts to prevent it" (23). "The constitution provides for tuition-free universal education, and the law provides for compulsory schooling of children between the ages of six through 15. Nevertheless, many children did not attend school. Parents often had to pay their children’s school fees as well as provide their uniforms and supplies. Other factors affecting school enrollment included distance to the nearest school, lack of transportation, shortages of teachers and instructional materials, and lack of school feeding programs. Girls' enrollment was lower than that of boys at all levels due to poverty, a cultural...more
Sept. 22, 2021, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The harsh reality is that; harassment threats directly challenge the potential of young Pakistani girls. Numerous individuals refuse to procure education and execute jobs due to the realm of harassment possibility; as, harassers can linger in the form of professors, employers, religious teachers, and numerous other possibilities. With that said, changing the mindset of a conservative society, and educating potential rapists can be a slow and gradual process. Public hangings are exceedingly inefficient too, there is underreporting of data, and police corruption prevails widely. Henceforth, it is crucial to generate preventive conversations with adolescents at a young age. The fact of the matter is that children can encounter predators in...more
Sept. 22, 2021, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee welcomes the State party’s efforts to improve its institutional and policy framework aimed at accelerating the elimination of discrimination against women and promoting gender equality, such as the adoption of the following:…(e) Third national education strategic plan for the period 2017–2021, which includes measures for addressing discrimination against girls in education...(k) Safe Schools Declaration, in which it is acknowledged that schools and universities have been attacked to prevent the education of girls and in which the guidelines for protecting schools and universities from military use during armed conflict are endorsed, in 2015" (2). "The Committee commends the State party for including education on women’s rights and gender equality...more
Sept. 21, 2021, 2:40 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"In their November publication of Inescapable Violence: Child Abuse within North Korea, the Seoul-based NGO People for Successful Corean Unification documented endemic child abuse, including child sexual abuse, in North Korean schools..." (21). Sexual abuse in schools is likely a barrier to girls going to school (SFR - CODER COMMENT).
Sept. 14, 2021, 9:15 a.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Tachira is a member of the Konkomba people, and girls born into that community are not educated. They’re kept at home, doing all the household chores until their parents effectively sell them into servitude to another family through arranged marriage. Most remain illiterate, vulnerable, and dependent for the rest of their lives" (para 8).
Sept. 14, 2021, 8:03 a.m.
Countries: El Salvador
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"In El Salvador, having a child at age fourteen isn’t simply a cause for shame in the eyes of a religious community. It also increases the odds of a life lived in crushing poverty, of marginal education and employment, of vulnerability to the violence and chaos that scores the lives of the poorest Salvadorans" (para 48).
Sept. 8, 2021, 6:17 p.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Hans Lemoine, a slöjd (crafts) teacher in Sweden, noted that girls in his classes are often more focused and determined to finish their projects. 'More boys have a happy-go-lucky or impatient attitude than girls and need more prodding and guidance to finish their work,' he said. Lemoine explained that slöjd is a subject that inculcates independence, responsibility, curiosity, and creativity among young people in Sweden, and is part of the gender-equality framework in the education system" (para 6).
Sept. 8, 2021, 4:30 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Education is mandatory up to the lower secondary level (six years for primary school and three years for lower secondary), and the law provides for free education up to and including the college level. UNICEF reported that 3.7 million children were not in school due to discrimination, poverty, lack of access, and continuing conflict, among other reasons, 60 percent of whom are girls. Only 16 percent of the country’s schools are for girls, and many of them lack proper sanitation facilities. UNAMA also noted that armed groups tried to restrict girls’ access to education. In April armed men on motorcycles set fire to two girls’ schools outside Farah City in...more
Aug. 31, 2021, 6:27 p.m.
Countries: Albania
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"School attendance is mandatory through the ninth grade or until the age of 16, whichever occurs first, but many children, particularly in rural areas, left school earlier to work with their families. Parents must purchase supplies, books, uniforms, and space heaters for some classrooms; these were prohibitively expensive for many families, particularly Roma and members of other minorities. Many families also cited these costs as a reason for not sending girls to school." (p 19-20).
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:13 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Iran, Jordan, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

“The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 23, 2021, 7:05 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Girls represented approximately half of all children enrolled in primary school but were absent more often than boys due to household duties. At the secondary level, child marriage and pregnancy often caused girls to be expelled or otherwise prevented girls from finishing school. The Center for Reproductive Rights reported in 2013 that more than 55,000 girls over the previous decade had been expelled from school for being pregnant. Regional authorities reported that it was common practice for school administrators to subject girls to hands-on external abdominal examinations for pregnancy. Under the Education and Training Policy launched by the government in 2015, pregnant girls may be reinstated in schools. In June...more
Aug. 20, 2021, 1:37 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Education was free, but not compulsory, through grade nine. Many children left school to help their families in subsistence agriculture or work in other activities. Others began school at a late age or did not attend school at all. The government did not deny girls equal access to education, but families with limited resources often gave priority to boys, especially in rural areas. According to international organization reports, enrollment dropped significantly for girls after primary school in urban areas, while secondary school enrollment for boys dropped significantly in rural areas" (23).
Aug. 17, 2021, 2:50 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Women did not have equal access to education, economic opportunities, health facilities, or social freedoms. In rural areas women performed much of the subsistence farming and had little opportunity for formal education" (p 20). "Education is tuition free and universal at the primary level for all children. At the secondary level, however, education is tuition free only for girls, based on a government policy to encourage female education. Pregnant girls were prohibited from attending classes and taking examinations with other students on the grounds that they were a 'bad moral influence'" (p 20).
Aug. 6, 2021, 4:21 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Many parents kept young girls at home to work, and girls rarely attended school for more than a few years" (p 17).
July 31, 2021, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-LAW-1

"Tanzania’s ban on pregnant schoolgirls dates back to the 60s. Amid renewed criticism, it was reaffirmed in a 2017 speech by Tanzania’s president, John Magufuli, who stated that 'as long as I am president … no pregnant student will be allowed to return to school. We cannot allow this immoral behaviour to permeate our primary and secondary schools.' Sierra Leone lifted a similar ban last week" (para 6-7).
July 31, 2021, 3:54 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Tanzania has pledged to improve access to education for pregnant girls after receiving a controversial $500m (£402m) World Bank loan, but has stopped short of readmitting them to mainstream classrooms" (para 1). "A public notice released earlier this week by Tanzania’s education minister, JoyceNdalichako, said: 'The target [of the loan] is to reach more than 6.5 million secondary school students across the country, without discrimination and shall include girls who drop out of school for various reasons, including pregnancy'" (para 3). "Of the 60,000 students who drop out of secondary school every year in Tanzania, 5,500 leave due to pregnancy according to World Bank data. Tanzania’s ban on pregnant schoolgirls...more
July 29, 2021, 7:20 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"I grew up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, not far from Mr. Reisinger’s office. I remember classmates in my hometown getting pregnant, marrying and dropping out of school as early as middle school, never to return to class. In high school, I was a maid of honor in a wedding that the bride later described as the worst day of her life" (Para 12). "Married girls are 50 percent more likely to drop out of high school and much less likely to finish college" (Para 13).
July 29, 2021, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"'The data shows that the overwhelming majority of child marriages result in kids dropping out of school, losing housing, and facing lifelong physical and emotional abuse,' Puryear said" (Para 19).
July 27, 2021, 4:39 p.m.
Countries: Madagascar
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The constitution provides for tuition-free public education for all citizen children and makes primary education until the age of 16 compulsory. Nevertheless, parents were increasingly required to pay registration and various fees to subsidize teacher salaries and other costs. As a result, education became inaccessible for many children. According to UNICEF, boys and girls generally had equal access to education, although girls were more likely to drop out during adolescence" (p 22).