The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for ASR-PRACTICE-1

Sept. 22, 2021, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee is also concerned about the fact that girls lack access to secondary and higher education and to non-traditional fields of study, including science, technology, engineering and mathematics" (12).
Sept. 8, 2021, 6:17 p.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Hans Lemoine, a slöjd (crafts) teacher in Sweden, noted that girls in his classes are often more focused and determined to finish their projects. 'More boys have a happy-go-lucky or impatient attitude than girls and need more prodding and guidance to finish their work,' he said. Lemoine explained that slöjd is a subject that inculcates independence, responsibility, curiosity, and creativity among young people in Sweden, and is part of the gender-equality framework in the education system" (para 6).
Aug. 28, 2021, 11:07 a.m.
Countries: Estonia
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Female researchers receive maternity benefit from the state during their maternity leave and parental benefit. The period of maternity (parental) leave is taken into account in the process of evaluation and selection for female applicants for a researchers position or funding" (25).
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The interviews highlighted five cultural areas where being a woman and being a physicist aligned. These areas were religion, social interactions, community goals, femininity, and family life. In Muslim-majority countries, social interactions with the opposite gender are less common and less encouraged than in Western countries. The seven women were mostly educated in gender-segregated classes. As a result, they did not feel out of place in a physics setting because of their gender. The women also noted that when they did interact with men physicists, they did not feel that they had to supress their femininity to have their intellect—and not their appearance—be the focus of the interaction. They put...more
Aug. 27, 2021, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: Canada, United States
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Many groups have studied the physics-gender-gap problem, identifying a number of possible causes. For example, researchers have reported both subtle and blatant stereotyping of women in physics laboratories in the US, Canada, and Europe and have shown that such stereotyping negatively impacted women’s careers [5] (see also Viewpoint: How Stereotypes Impact Women in Physics). That study and others all focused on western countries, where physics is a man-dominated field..." (para 2).
July 22, 2021, 5:07 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"While social norms and gender stereotypes effectively excluded women from pursuing careers in the justice field, leaps and bounds have been made since the 1990s, with women’s representation catapulting to almost parity in law schools. By 2018, women judges and magistrates also made up a remarkable 48% of the judiciary" (Para 5).
July 20, 2021, 11:47 a.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"'Female representation in companies’ boards reached its historic high at the end of last year,” Ciocca[Consob Commissioner Paolo Ciocca] said, adding that in the future “it will be crucial to neutralise the gender distortions that still see an under-representation of women in advanced science, technology, engineering, mathematics studies and lower job opportunities and lower salaries for them'"(para 4).
July 16, 2021, 11:55 a.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Group members say libraries in the Kurdish region are considered a largely male environment and are far from female-friendly. 'Many young girls are desperate for books,' explains Ferah[Name has been changed to protect anonymity], a member of Sofia. 'We are keen to meet this demand because we know that many will read in secret.'I was told many families forbid girls to read in libraries because they think they may rebel against patriarchal norms. 'How can we be free when this basic right is denied us,' asks Ferah"(para 24,25).
June 25, 2021, 2:16 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"None of the students to whom Reuters spoke expressed any apprehension about taking the course [on gender and women studies]. Nor did a small group of students hanging around the classroom offer any objections" (para 20).
June 25, 2021, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Hungary
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Hungary is one of the European countries with the least female representation in government and has come under scrutiny for how it addresses gender issues[...]"(para 13).
June 9, 2021, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Poland
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

“'Girls as Engineers!' is an innovative project promoting technical faculties among young women – students of upper secondary schools. In the academic year 2007/2008, when the campaign 'Girls as Engineers!' was launched for the first time, 98,293 women were studying at technical universities. After two editions of the campaign, in the academic year 2009/2010, there were already 104,558 female students. After the last edition of the campaign, in the academic year 2010/2011, 108,534 women studied at technical universities, i.e. 3,976 more than in the previous year. In April 2010 the campaign 'Girls as Engineers!' was extended by a new initiative 'Girls choose science!', aimed at encouraging girls to take up...more
April 26, 2021, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"In the past it had contributed to a sort of segregation, so that girls tended to study humanistic subjects while boys were oriented to scientific-technical subjects. Although not formally envisaged in the Italian educational system, such orientation still remains...The distinction and different approach to the subjects to be studied by boys and girls emerges more clearly at the higher level of the education, as long as girls tend to get prepared for professions relating to education and services, despite their school curriculum proves to be better, also in scientific and technical subjects. Their results, in terms of scores, are higher, also when passing the State examinations" (57).
Jan. 31, 2021, 1:58 p.m.
Countries: Angola
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

“To ensure the effective functioning of mechanisms for the advancement of women in all areas and levels of women’s empowerment, the Government provides, in a rational manner, human and technical resources to ensure vocational training and improvement of technical skills where necessary for the development of activities with the necessary effectiveness and efficiency, the most important factor being cooperation with institutions of civil society in the framework of strengthened and enhanced capacity for coordination of the various existing mechanisms” (pp. 7). “For the empowerment of women, several occupational training programmes have been carried out at the national level, in which 380 women from associations, cooperatives and civil society organizations received...more
Jan. 20, 2021, 4:06 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

“‘They (the Taliban) deprived us and have warned they would impose fines on the girls if they participated in the exam, each girl has to pay a 40,000 afghani fine if they appeared in the exam,’ said a resident of Badakhshan” (Para 6).
Jan. 1, 2021, 2:57 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Each year, the organisation provides dozens of girls with an opportunity to learn a trade so that they can become breadwinners in their own right. The majority of the girls opt for tailoring classes, but others want to take the courses in welding and electrical engineering - professions that challenge the patriarchal and gendered stereotypes so ingrained in Tanzania's communities" (para 82083).
Jan. 1, 2021, 2:12 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

“He [Iranian Education Minister Mohsen Haji Mirzaee] added that schoolgirls in Iran have been provided with “good learning opportunities” and that the effects of this are visible, citing an example of many girls competing in math and science Olympiads in Iran” (para. 16).
Jan. 1, 2021, 11:50 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

“Gender stereotypes and a lack of information and support are some of the barriers to women’s participation in STEM and other nontraditional fields in community colleges. these challenges are not insurmountable, but institutions must actively intervene to help close the gender gap in these fields. Women are actually more likely than men to attend community college at some point on their way to earning a bachelor’s degree in STEM, so increasing women’s participation in STEM at community colleges could also help address the gender gap in STEM among bachelor’s degree recipients” (3). Women who may not have taken or had access to advanced courses in math and science in high...more
Dec. 24, 2020, 12:25 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"'When we asked her what she wants to be when she’s older, she confidently said a doctor,' said Vdovin. 'For now this sounds unreal, because a medical education is among the most expensive in Israel and Palestine - but this is her dream'" (para 8-9).
Dec. 23, 2020, 3:19 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Extensive gender gaps exist in education; nutrition, health care and employment" (para 5).
Aug. 31, 2020, 6:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

“Soon, the Taliban blasted statues with rocket-propelled grenades and heavy artillery until they fell. "Then they started destroying our minds," [Fawzia Koofi] writes, burning schools, books and banning literature. In short order, girls could go nowhere. They were terrified of being accused of "morality crimes" and dragged to the Taliban's Ministry of Vice and Virtue” (Para 66-67).
July 10, 2020, 6:14 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1, ASR-DATA-1

"In many ways, women in Iran are better off than those in many other Middle Eastern countries. Iranian women work as lawyers, doctors, pilots, film directors and truck drivers. They hold 60 percent of university seats and constitute 50 percent of the work force" (para 11-12).
June 23, 2020, 5:54 p.m.
Countries: Estonia
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee is, however, concerned about: (a) The concentration of women and girls in traditionally female-dominated fields of study and career paths, such as education, social services, health and welfare, and their underrepresentation in, for example, information technology and architecture, owing to persistent gender stereotypes" (8).
June 23, 2020, 5:49 p.m.
Countries: Serbia
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Girls still outnumber boys in the following education fields: textile and leather industries, personal services, chemistry, non-metals, graphic design and health care and social protection. Among the pupils who complete four-year general secondary education (‘gymnasiums’) there are more girls (58 per cent) than boys (42 per cent). There are also more girls among the pupils who complete four-year secondary vocational schools (52 per cent girls versus 48 per cent boys). Boys outnumber girls in the following fields: electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and metalworking, geodesy and construction, transport, forestry and wood-processing and geology and mining. According to the PISA 2012 results, girls score higher on reading and scientific literacy, while boys...more
May 31, 2020, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Some of the higher education and vocational training institutions had a higher ratio of women to the others, which is due to preferences of women for certain career deemed suitable to their characteristics, talents and aptitudes" (18).
May 29, 2020, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Research shows that playing with blocks, puzzles and construction toys helps children with spatial development, said Dr. Susan C. Levine, chairwoman of the psychology department at the University of Chicago and co-principal investigator at the National Science Foundation’s Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center. Even controlling for other skills such as verbal and numerical skills, she said, children with better spatial thinking are more likely to eventually go into mathematics, engineering, science and technology. She said that a set aimed at girls could be beneficial, if only because it might increase girls’ likelihood of participating in construction activities" (para 11-12). "Dr. O’Brien, the consultant on the new Barbie set, said adults...more