The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CLCC-LAW-2

Sept. 17, 2021, 10 p.m.
Countries: New Zealand
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1, CLCC-LAW-2

"Children born in the country attain citizenship if either parent is a citizen or legal permanent resident of the country. Children born outside the country attain citizenship if either parent is a citizen born in the country. The law requires notification of births by both parents as soon as 'reasonably practicable,' deemed as being within two months of the child’s birth, and most births were registered within this period" (10).
Sept. 10, 2021, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Using a woman's name in public is frowned upon and can be considered an insult. Many Afghan men are reluctant to say the names of their sisters, wives or mothers in public. Women are generally only referred to as the mother, daughter or sister of the eldest male in their family, and Afghan law dictates that only the father's name should be recorded on a birth certificate" (para 4). "The campaign appears to have taken a big step in the past few weeks. A source close to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said he had instructed the Afghanistan Central Civil Registration Authority (Accra) to look into the possibility of amending the...more
Aug. 6, 2021, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Chile
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1, CLCC-LAW-2

"Citizenship is derived by birth within the country’s territory and from one’s parents or grandparents. There were no reports that birth registration was denied on a discriminatory basis" (11).
July 7, 2021, 11:18 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"The kingdom[Saudi Arabia] has granted women greater rights in recent years, like the right to drive, run and vote in local elections and play sports in school. Ultimately, however, male guardianship laws remain in place. Under these laws, a woman must have her male guardian's permission in order to obtain a passport, travel abroad or marry"(para 50,51).
June 25, 2021, 12:36 p.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"The Kuwaiti nationality law discriminates against women, preventing them from passing on their nationality to their children and spouses on an equal basis with men[...]"(para 9).
April 30, 2021, 8:17 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

""In January, the Egyptian cabinet approved a personal status law that would require women to get the consent of a male guardian to…register a child's birth" (para 2). "A recent court case highlights one of the problems inherent in the proposed law. A woman named Amal Abdel Hameed, who says she was raped, is currently in the final stage of appeal to have the name of her two-year-old daughter's father—her alleged rapist— listed on the girl's birth certificate. The father's identity has been confirmed by a DNA test. Current law does not mandate paternity registration for children conceived out of wedlock, so under the vagaries of Egyptian law, obtaining a...more
April 22, 2021, 6:30 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"If the bill passes, the Births and Deaths Registration Act would also be amended to facilitate a child's registration at birth by a parent or parents of a child born through surrogacy, to avoid the legal imbroglio of having the surrogate mother automatically registered on the birth certificate, as is currently the case" (para 18).
March 6, 2021, 9:44 p.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Marriage certificates still appear to be required to obtain birth certificates. These policies disproportionately affect migrant women and can leave their babies undocumented, unable to obtain identification documents or travel" (para 14).
Sept. 14, 2020, 6:34 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Bahraini women are still unable to pass Bahraini nationality to their children from non-Bahraini husbands" (1). "The State report, Para. 159, indicates that the legislative authority is currently discussing the Ministers Council’s proposal to amend the Nationality Law to allow the children of Bahraini women married to foreigners to obtain Bahraini citizenship in accordance with rules that respect the Constitution and safeguard the of State’s sovereignty. However, four years after its approval by the Council, the bill is still not discussed, thought the Committees concluding remark No. (34), highlighted the need to ‘take all necessary steps to accelerate the adoption of a bill’. The National Council’s legislative chapter (2014-2018) has...more
Aug. 2, 2020, 5:17 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"The reforms also included important advances for women on civil status issues, whereby a woman can now register her children's births with the civil status office, which was previously restricted to fathers or paternal relatives, as well as inform the office of a death, marriage or divorce" (para 21).
May 15, 2020, 7:15 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"According to the Births and Deaths (Compulsory Registration) Act Number 69 of 1992, registration of births and deaths is compulsory in all cases in Nigeria" (17).
Feb. 24, 2020, 11:09 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Perhaps the biggest hurdle that single mothers in China face actually comes after the birth: legally registering your child, or getting him/her a hukou" (para 17). "Without these registration documents your child isn’t entitled to any state benefits, such as free education, health care, or even a job as an adult. Without a hukou, a person can’t travel on trains, use internet cafes, or even buy a mobile phone SIM card. And to obtain it? You need a birth certificate, which requires details of the father (Hubei province is the exception to this)" (para 18)
Feb. 14, 2020, 12:34 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Citizenship is derived exclusively from the father, which may result in statelessness for children of a citizen mother and noncitizen father who may not transmit his own citizenship (see section 2.d.). If a child’s birth is not registered within the first year, the process for legitimizing the birth is long and costly, often deterring families from registration" (29).
Jan. 30, 2020, 1:05 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"If the child is not born in the country, in rare cases the Ministry of Interior may permit a woman to transmit citizenship to the child if the father dies or abandons the child" (30).
Oct. 1, 2019, 2:44 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Citizenship derives from birth to a citizen parent and, in certain circumstances, from birth within the country’s territory to alien parents" (27).
July 8, 2019, 12:38 p.m.
Countries: Burundi
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"The Committee also notes with concern the discriminatory provision of the Code of the Person and the Family (art. 38), under which the registration of a child's birth can be effected only by the father, and by mothers in very specific cases. It further notes the high rates of unregistered births" (9).
June 21, 2019, 12:48 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Citizenship is legally derived only from the father. Children may be born stateless if they were: the child of a citizen mother and a stateless father; a child born to an unmarried citizen mother who is not legally affiliated with the citizen father, even if the father has recognized the child; or the child of a citizen father and a noncitizen mother if the government did not authorize their marriage prior to birth. A child may lose legal identification and accompanying rights if authorities withdraw identification documents from a parent (possible when a naturalized parent denaturalizes voluntarily or loses citizenship through other acts). The sons of citizen mothers and noncitizen...more
June 20, 2019, 10:07 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Under the Nationality Law, female citizens face legal discrimination, since they are unable to transmit citizenship to their noncitizen husbands and to children born from a marriage to a noncitizen" (p. 15).
June 11, 2019, 10:04 a.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"The government did not effectively implement laws and policies to provide certain habitual residents the opportunity to gain nationality in a timely manner and on a nondiscriminatory basis. Children born in the country to non-Bahamian parents, to an unwed Bahamian father and a non-Bahamian mother, or outside the country to a Bahamian mother and a non-Bahamian father do not acquire citizenship at birth" (9). "Children born in the country to married parents, one of whom is Bahamian, acquire citizenship at birth. In the case of unwed parents, the child takes the citizenship of the mother. All children born in the country may apply for citizenship upon reaching their 18th birthday....more
June 8, 2019, 1:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Refugee households headed by women faced difficulty in certifying nationality of offspring in absence of the father, which increased the risk of statelessness among this population. Civil registry departments and sharia courts in the Za’atri and Azraq camps helped refugees register births" (24). "The government deemed some children--including children of unmarried women, orphans, or certain interfaith marriages involving a Muslim woman and converts from Islam to another religion--illegitimate and denied them standard registration" (33). "Authorities removed children born out of wedlock from their mothers and placed them in orphanages, regardless of the mother’s desire for custody" (33).
May 16, 2019, 9:32 a.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

“Some of the most problematic consequences of unregistered marriages are the rights of women to property, obtaining birth certificates for children and access to social services" (para 4).
April 26, 2019, 9:01 a.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Each of the child's parents or whoever having legal authority thereon shall procure the issuance of the documents proving his birth, nationality and all other documents according to the laws in force at the State" (Pg 4).
March 15, 2019, 11:35 a.m.
Countries: Vanuatu
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"A citizen single mother may not transmit citizenship to her child, but the child may apply for citizenship at age 18 years" (10).
March 15, 2019, 9:33 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: CWC-DATA-2, CLCC-LAW-2

"The law permits both parents to pass nationality to their children. There were, nonetheless, cases in which authorities denied identification papers to children because they were born to unmarried parents, particularly in rural areas or in the cases of poorly educated mothers unaware of their legal rights" (page 29).
March 5, 2019, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Malaysia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Authorities require citizens to provide their marriage certificate and both parents’ government identity cards" (24).
Feb. 8, 2019, 3:28 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco, Nepal
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Unmarried parents must overcome significant hurdles where the system does not recognize children born outside marriage—as is the case in Bahrain and Nepal—or requires additional procedures for registering their birth, as in Iraq, Jordan and Morocco, where an unmarried parent must obtain a court order to register their child" (p. 29).
Feb. 8, 2019, 3:28 p.m.
Countries: Gambia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"And in Gambia, the father is legally required to register children born within a marriage, and the mother has this legal responsibility for children born outside marriage" (p. 29).
Feb. 8, 2019, 3:28 p.m.
Countries: Fiji, Namibia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"In Barbados, Fiji and Namibia, a mother can legally register the newborn only when the father is dead, absent or incapable" (p. 29).
Feb. 8, 2019, 3:28 p.m.
Countries: Barbados
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"In Barbados...a mother can legally register the newborn only when the father is dead, absent or incapable" (p. 29).
Feb. 8, 2019, 3:28 p.m.
Countries: Greece
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"In Greece, the father is legally obligated to register the child; the mother needs a special mandate by a notary attorney to do so" (p. 29).