The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for DLB-DATA-1

Sept. 8, 2021, 5:50 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"And a Japanese governor who recommended men go grocery shopping during the pandemic because women take too long" (para 2). This suggests that women may generally be expected to shop for groceries (JLR CODER COMMENT). "During the economic miracle, women were largely relegated to the domestic sphere or occupied clerical and secretarial roles in offices, largely due to attitudes at that time. '(The older generation) think back then society worked better and the economy was better -- there's that arrogance,' said Choo. Mori and Nikai both said women should remain silent. Choo says their disparaging remarks toward women were examples of traditional and outdated views on the place of women...more
July 29, 2021, 3:23 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In addition to rape and sexual violence committed in the context of attacks on villages, many women and girls have been raped during or following displacement from their homes. These attacks have targeted women and girls travelling to displaced persons camps or to towns, leaving the relative protection of those locations to collect firewood, water or other items, and taking these goods to market to sell in exchange for necessary family items. Women and girls are particularly at risk for rape once displaced because collecting firewood and fetching water are chores traditionally allocated to women. Most of the displaced communities living in the camps are almost entirely dependent on humanitarian...more
June 29, 2021, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Mary, another domestic worker, said that her employer would force her to work for 19 hours every day, for seven days a week, without a break or a day off" (para 17).
May 31, 2021, 5:31 p.m.
Countries: Switzerland
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The Swiss Trade Union Federation, which helped to organize the protests, said the coronavirus pandemic had shone a light on the lack of progress in improving equality, working conditions and recognition of unpaid domestic work. '(The pandemic) has in fact drawn attention to the kind of work that is very often carried out by women',' the federation wrote on its website" (para 4-5).
March 31, 2021, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"During the pandemic Pakistan has seen…an increased burden of domestic and care work imposed on working women" (para 5). "Najeeb said women have faced a significant rise in care work at home, exacerbated by the increase in domestic violence" (para 13).
Feb. 23, 2021, 9:16 p.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"This research indicates that adolescent girls spend 75% more time than boys on household chores, which is significantly higher than the global average. Girls undertake 15-20 hours of chores each week, whereas boys are more likely to complete just a few hours, one to six" (para 10).
Jan. 31, 2021, 3:04 p.m.
Countries: Australia
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Women continue to do the bulk of unpaid care and domestic work, with 32.6% of women reporting doing 15 or more hours of unpaid domestic work per week as compared to 11.7% of men" (9).
Jan. 1, 2021, 4 p.m.
Countries: Finland
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Men are as likely as women to be chasing young children through Helsinki’s vast new central library, or walking them home beside the city’s lakes. Statistics from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development show it is the only country where fathers spend more time with school-age children than mothers, said Mikko Koivumaa" (para 11-12). "While men are entitled to parental leave, they account for only about 10% of the total, leaving mostly women caring for young children in their first year of life, with knock-on effects for careers, earnings and pensions" (para 23).
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"And Ms. Hojo, like many women in Japan, cannot accept a full-time job even after Mr. Abe pushed through a law intended to ease Japan’s brutal work culture. Because she shoulders the bulk of housework and child care, the hours at work would be too demanding" (para 4). "Ms. Hojo, the accountant, said she viewed her destiny as extending beyond motherhood. 'I still have ambition,' she said. When she returned to work after staying home with her newborn daughter for two years, she took a part-time job at the medical clinic where she had previously worked full time. Since her husband worked 100-hour weeks as a delivery service driver, she...more
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Mr. Kataoka, a marketing web consultant, believed he was already doing his share. He gave his wife a list of tasks he regularly performs: bathing their two pre-school-age children, washing dishes, overseeing tooth brushing. How little he knew. In a meticulous spreadsheet, Ms. Kataoka, a nursing student, enumerated her 210 tasks to his 21. 'I really wanted him to understand just how much I was doing,' she said" (para 3-5). "For working couples, Japan’s efforts to combat the spread of the virus — encouraging teleworking and asking residents to stay inside — have highlighted disparities in the division of domestic work that shape households across the globe but are especially...more
Jan. 1, 2021, 2:26 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Cultural traditions discourage women from working outside the home, according to Mashooque Birhamani, SSO’s chief executive officer" (para 2). "Clean water is also a major issue—many citizens, usually women and children, must walk five or more miles in search of drinking water. The task often keeps children, particularly girls, out of school" (para 11).
Jan. 1, 2021, 11:50 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

“The demands of family responsibilities can be a significant barrier to enrolling and remaining in school for all student parents but especially for women, who generally devote more time to caregiving than men do. A majority of parents report spending 30 hours or more a week on caregiving, and mothers report spending more time on caring for dependents than fathers do. More than two-thirds (68 percent) of mothers attending community college provide 30 or more hours of caregiving weekly, compared with 42 percent of fathers (Miller et al., 2011). Caregiving responsibilities reduce the time student parents spend on homework or studying” (23). “In general, women are more likely than men...more
Dec. 31, 2020, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Over the last 50 years, women decreased their hours of unpaid work as they increased the hours of paid work. Men have been doing more housework and child care, but they didn’t take up the slack so gender inequalities in the use of time are still large in all countries. Turkish women spend the most time doing unpaid work, such as housework or shopping, at 377 minutes a day, followed by Mexican women at 373. This compares to their menfolk: Mexican men who spend an average of 113 minutes on unpaid work and Korean men who spend only 45 minutes, the least of all" (para 5).
Dec. 31, 2020, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: Mexico, South Korea
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Over the last 50 years, women decreased their hours of unpaid work as they increased the hours of paid work. Men have been doing more housework and child care, but they didn’t take up the slack so gender inequalities in the use of time are still large in all countries. Turkish women spend the most time doing unpaid work, such as housework or shopping, at 377 minutes a day, followed by Mexican women at 373.This compares to their menfolk: Mexican men who spend an average of 113 minutes on unpaid work and Korean men who spend only 45 minutes, the least of all" (para 5).
Dec. 31, 2020, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: France, Italy
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"When it comes to time spent on personal care, including eating and sleeping, the gap between the sexes is much smaller. French women spend the most time in personal care, at 755, just ahead of Italian women at 697. Their men spend almost as much time (738) – just ahead of Italian males at 697" (para 6).
Aug. 30, 2020, 9:08 p.m.
Countries: Armenia
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In the private sphere, women are still seen as responsible for childcare and all domestic work" (para 5). This suggests a rigid division of gender roles in Armenia (RAO-CODER COMMENT).
May 19, 2020, 12:18 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"These villages are part of a region called Bundelkhand. Here, every woman spends about 3- 5 hours daily to get water because it is thought to be a woman’s duty to fetch water for her family" (para 5).
March 16, 2020, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Low labour force participation characterizes the labour market of Afghanistan. With men having higher participation, at 80.5%, women show very low engagement in economic activity at 26.7%... With agriculture as the backbone of the rural economy, women play a critical role, accounting for nearly 43% of the sector’s labour force. However, despite playing a vital role in agriculture, they are engaged in the lower levels of the value chain and labour-intensive activities such as performing irrigation, weeding, harvesting, and minimal processing. Men, on the other hand, are engaged in the upper level of the value chain. Further, women working on the farm are either paid a very low wage or...more
Dec. 14, 2019, 3:07 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"But their careers are often held back by a relentless tide of domestic burdens, like filling out the meticulous daily logs required by their children's day-care centers, preparing the intricate meals often expected of Japanese women, supervising and signing off on homework from school and afterschool tutoring sessions, or hanging rounds of laundry" (para 19). "While some men say they want to pitch in more...employees are still expected to devote most of their waking hours to the company, making it difficult for many husbands to participate much on the home front" (para 20).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"More and more women can share family resources on an equal basis with men, and the concept of men and women sharing housework is now accepted, with the housework time gap between men and women shortened from 150 minutes 10 years ago to 74 minutes now" (para. 39).
Aug. 6, 2019, 8:14 a.m.
Countries: Comoros
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-2, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Societal discrimination against women was most apparent in rural areas, where women were mostly limited to farming and child-rearing duties, with fewer opportunities for education and wage employment" (page 9-10).
July 21, 2019, 6:15 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"The implications of the war for men are immense, from death at the battlefront to unemployment and the psychological stress of failing to provide for their families. More women are entering the labor market, especially in rural areas where most of the men are day laborers, and becoming the breadwinners of their families. This, of course, enables women in rural areas to assume greater power in the decision-making in their households and also forces the men to participate more in household tasks such as cooking, cleaning and taking care of children" (para 5).
March 22, 2019, 6:14 p.m.
Countries: Cyprus
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In addition, the MJPO, the NMWR, the CGE, the MOEC, the MIGS and the IMH Business are implementing the European programme entitled: 'Breaking the Mould: Promoting Gender Equality in Cyprus'. The programme is of a two-year duration (2016-2018), and was funded by the European Commission. Its objectives include the promotion of flexible working arrangements for men in Cyprus, and encouraging companies and particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to implement simple, family-friendly measures. Moreover, the project aims to change the stereotype that domestic work is not a masculine role" (15).
Feb. 1, 2019, 2:36 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"More than half of rural households (53%) travel 30 minutes or longer round trip to fetch drinking water. In both rural and urban households, adult women are most likely to be responsible for fetching drinking water (17% in urban households and 68% in rural households)" (10).
Nov. 16, 2018, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Women and children carry much of the burden of the impact of illicit drugs as men are most likely to be drug users in the community. Due to their husband’s drug use, married women of drug users are commonly left with all the burdens of raising a family, including income generation, household work and childcare; In the family of drug addicted, there are increased rates of violence and instability and increased hardship for the family as they tend to become impoverished, with husbands stealing women’s earnings as money for drug use. Source: Palaung Women's Organization (PWO) and the Shan Women’s Action Network (SWAN)" (page 43).
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

“Self-employed women work slightly more hours per week than women who are not self-employed (40.1 hours per week, on average, compared with 38.9 hours” (139)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1, DLB-DATA-1

“The National Alliance for Caregivers and AARP study (2009) found that, on average, caregivers spent 20 hours per week providing care, rising to almost 40 hours per week for those who lived with the person who needed care. The weekly time spent is not much lower for those who are employed: the 2014 Older Adult Caregiver Study found that adults who worked full-time while providing care for someone aged 50 and older spent a median of 16 hours per week on such care (Matos 2014). Time spent on support for parents and in-laws is twice as high for families living in poverty than it is for high-income families” (91)more
July 11, 2018, 8 p.m.
Countries: Uruguay
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The persistence of patriarchal attitudes and discriminatory stereotypes about the roles and responsibilities of women and men in the family and in society, which perpetuate violence and discrimination against women in areas such as education, employment and health" (page 6). "The low percentage of men exercising their paternity leave, notwithstanding the legislation that provides for paternity leave entitlements in all sectors of employment" (page 11).
July 6, 2018, 6:49 p.m.
Countries: Uruguay
Variables: MULV-DATA-1, CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1

"In 2014 the second national survey on time use was conducted. It showed that women’s unpaid workload is twice that of men. True, men are gainfully employed for more hours than women, but when unpaid work is factored in, women have an overall weekly workload that is significantly greater. Sixty-six per cent of women’s labour is unpaid work, while among men it is only 33 per cent of their work (Figures 12 to 14)" (page 40).
June 26, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: New Zealand
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In Tokelau culture, there is a clear demarcation between male and female roles. In the traditional social system, women have relatively high status, derived from their right to occupy the house owned by their kin groups and to manage domestic economies . . . At the same time it is evident that the traditional demarcation between male and female roles is becoming less marked" (page 56).