The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for ERBG-DATA-4

May 15, 2021, 8:42 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"The share of women working part-time was almost twice that of men and the average Japanese woman's income was 43.7 percent lower than that of a Japanese man, it added" (para 12).
April 26, 2021, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"The construction of...'relationships'... with the business realities allowed to build new forms of dialogue,...with the aim of better understanding problems related to the role of women in the labour market, such as...the poor granting of part-time jobs" (17).
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, ERBG-DATA-4

"About half of working women in Japan are employed in part-time or contract jobs without benefits, according to government data, compared with close to one in five men. That has reinforced a sense among some men that their paid work takes priority over their wives’ jobs, leaving women to carry the bulk of household chores" (para 17).
Dec. 31, 2020, 5:10 p.m.
Countries: Germany
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"In the Czech Republic, France and Poland, 20% of employed men also usually work for more than 50 hours per week, considerably more than in the other countries, including Germany, Hungary, Scandinavian countries and the Slovak Republic" (para 2).
Dec. 31, 2020, 5:10 p.m.
Countries: United Kingdom
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Among the sample of countries, the United Kingdom has the longest working hours culture: more than 20% of employed men usually work 40 to 50 hours per week and another 20% working more than 50 hours per week" (para 2). "France and the United Kingdom are also the countries where most women usually work more than 40 hours per week (over 15%). At the same time, many British women work part-time, while the prevailing '35 hours working week' contributes to most women working less than 40 hours per week in France" (para 3).
Dec. 31, 2020, 5:10 p.m.
Countries: Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"In the Czech Republic, France and Poland, 20% of employed men also usually work for more than 50 hours per week, considerably more than in the other countries, including Germany, Hungary, Scandinavian countries and the Slovak Republic" (para 2). "The forty hour working week is the overriding working hours’ pattern for both men and women in the Czech and Slovak Republics, Poland and Hungary" (para 4).
Dec. 31, 2020, 5:10 p.m.
Countries: France
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"In the Czech Republic, France and Poland, 20% of employed men also usually work for more than 50 hours per week, considerably more than in the other countries, including Germany, Hungary, Scandinavian countries and the Slovak Republic" (para 2). "France and the United Kingdom are also the countries where most women usually work more than 40 hours per week (over 15%). At the same time, many British women work part-time, while the prevailing '35 hours working week' contributes to most women working less than 40 hours per week in France" (para 3).
Dec. 31, 2020, 5:10 p.m.
Countries: Finland, Norway, Sweden
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"In Finland, Norway and Sweden collective and/or sectoral agreements often lead to usual weekly working hours of around 37.5 hours per week. Indeed, the long working hours’ culture is not pervasive in Scandinavian countries, which contributes to the general perception in these countries that pursuing both active work- and family lives are compatible aspirations for both fathers and mothers" (para 4).
July 26, 2020, 9:25 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"There has been much attention on the increasing proportion of non-regular and parttime workers in the Japanese economy, particularly since the 1990s, and the issues associated with a precarious workforce. In Japan there is a clear gender difference when it comes to regular versus non-regular work (see figure 4). While 75.3% of all male employees are regular workers, only 41.9% of female employees fall into this category. Women are far more likely than men to be employed as non-regular workers, with 58.1% of women falling into this employment category in 2011 compared to 24.7% of men. This gender difference is to a great extent the result of an employment culture...more
March 29, 2020, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Maldives
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"The vast majority of working women are employed year-round (84%)" (37).
Feb. 15, 2020, 9:16 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Even in sectors where female presence is higher than average, the difficulty to achieve top positions is common. Part-time employees are more numerous among women. Since 2008, the number of part-time employed women exceeded 2 million; in 2014 never stops growing and reached 2,520,000, mainly concentrated in the North. Provided that in the temporary employment, gender differences are less pronounced, part-time employed women rate rose, between 2011-2014, from 29.8 per cent to 33.1 per cent. Part-time jobs in various forms have contributed to increasing labour opportunities, helping women reconcile work and family. However, it also reflects negatively on women’s work conditions, qualifications, and career’s advancement." (para 115).
May 28, 2019, 8:38 p.m.
Countries: Norway
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"According to Statistics Norway, in the second quarter of the year, nearly 40 percent of women and 17 percent of men worked part time" (p. 17).
April 22, 2019, 6:15 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

Table no. 29 shows the number of employed persons working full-time or part-time for 2013 and 2014. In 2013, 89,3% of women and 91% of men were working full time and 10,7% of women and 9% of men were working part-time. In 2014, 90,8% of women and 93% of men were working full-time and 9,2% of women and 7% of men were working part-time (23).
March 18, 2019, 7:25 a.m.
Countries: France
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Women constituted 63 percent of workers without an academic degree and were generally more likely to work part time, due in part to child-care responsibilities; 15.7 percent of women worked part time, compared with 9.2 percent of men" (p. 28).
Oct. 31, 2018, 1:23 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Abe’s policy has succeeded in bringing more than one and a half million more Japanese women into the labor force over the past five years… Yet most of the work is part time and relatively low paid" (para. 6).
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“women are nearly twice as likely as men to work part-time (29.4 percent compared with 15.8 percent)” (55)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4, MULV-DATA-1

“women are nine times as likely as men to work part-time for family care reasons” (92)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Women with disabilities are more likely to work part-time. The percentage of women with disabilities working part-time in 2013 was 38.4 percent, compared with 28.9 percent of women without disabilities” (58)
May 5, 2018, 3:12 p.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4, MULV-DATA-1

"The Committee is, however, concerned about...The excessive use of consecutive short-term employment contracts for, in particular, younger female workers, which undermines their job security in case of pregnancy" (10).
March 16, 2018, 7:33 a.m.
Countries: Spain
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2, ERBG-DATA-4

"They are also limited by a glass ceiling that sees men in Spanish companies occupy the majority of management positions, while women are over represented in part-time jobs and temporary contracts" (para 6).
March 16, 2018, 7:33 a.m.
Countries: Spain
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2, ERBG-DATA-4

"They are also limited by a glass ceiling that sees men in Spanish companies occupy the majority of management positions, while women are over represented in part-time jobs and temporary contracts" (para 6).
March 7, 2018, 7:28 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"One in four Italian women do not return to work after giving birth. Those who keep working often see earnings drop more than 35 percent, according to INPS, Italy’s social security institute, mostly because mothers have to reduce working hours since child care and other support is so limited" (para 8).
Feb. 14, 2018, 11:45 a.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Statistics from 2015 indicate that 66.8 per cent of working women were wage workers, compared to 69.1 per cent of men. The proportion of self-employed women was 14.0 per cent compared to 19.1 per cent for men. The proportion of women business owners was 2.1 per cent versus 7.1 per cent for men" (46).
Feb. 7, 2018, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

Table on page 44 shows that full-time and part time employment, disaggregated by gender, age 20-64 years: in 2005, 65% of women worked full time and 35% worked part time. 90% of men worked full time and 10% part time. By 2013, 70% of women were working full-time and 30% part time, compared to 89% of men working full-time and 11% working part-time (page 44). "According to its Instructions the National Mediation Office is to analyse the development of pay from a gender equality perspective. A comparison of women’s and men’s average pay for the whole of the labour market in 2012 shows that women had 86.1 per cent of...more
Aug. 7, 2017, 4:16 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4, ERBG-DATA-5

"Perhaps not surprisingly then, 68 percent of mothers in Japan quit their jobs upon marriage or childbirth. Among the women that do remain economically active, the majority seek part-time or irregular employment"(para 5)
July 6, 2017, 9:42 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"Among the women that do remain economically active, the majority seek part-time or irregular employment" (para 5).
July 3, 2017, 2:58 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1, ERBG-DATA-4

"the Committee remains concerned at:..The continued concentration of women in part-time work owing to family responsibilities, which affects their pension benefits and is partly responsible for post-retirement poverty as well as the persistent reports of maternity and child-birth related harassment" (11)
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3, ERBG-DATA-4, MULV-DATA-1

Figure 3.3 shows women’s share of part-time workers by main reason for part-time work in 2013. For those who work part-time because they are retired or have a social security limit on earnings, women make up 49.2%. For those who work part-time for slack work or business conditions, women make up 51.4%. For those who work part-time because they are in school or training, women make up 56.5%. For those who could only find part-time work, women make up 59%. For those who turn to part-time work because they have other family or personal obligations, women make up 90.1% of them. And for people who have child care problems and...more
Dec. 2, 2016, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

"The majority of the active working population are people in full-time employment. In 2012, the share of part-time employed women and men stood at 12.4 and 8.9 per cent, respectively. A slight upward trend has been recorded in the part-time work of women and a slight downward trend in the part-time work of men" (38)
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: ERBG-DATA-4

“Eighty-five percent of employed women work all year round, and 15 percent work either seasonally (7 percent) or occasionally (8 percent). Continuity of employment varies by sector. Eighty-eight percent of women who work in the agricultural sector work year round, compared with 83 percent of women engaged in nonagricultural work. Twelve percent of women who are employed in agricultural sector are seasonal or occasional workers” (37).