The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for GEW-PRACTICE-2

Sept. 15, 2020, 2:32 p.m.
Countries: Cote D'Ivoire
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The Ivorian government stated in February that the amnesty law does not preclude Ivorian judges from investigating the worst crimes committed during the crisis, noting that it does not apply to individuals who are 'members of the military and armed groups'" (para 9).
Sept. 14, 2020, 4:53 p.m.
Countries: Colombia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, GEW-PRACTICE-1, GEW-PRACTICE-2

"In the southwestern municipality of Tumaco, where sexual violence, including by armed groups, is pervasive, women face an array of obstacles in ensuring protection and accountability" (para 42).
Aug. 31, 2020, 6:15 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"In June, in a case regarding sexual violence against 36 Maya Achí women in the 1980s, a pretrial judge dismissed proceedings against six former paramilitaries and ordered the immediate release of the defendants after she excluded key evidence from the case, including testimonies from victims and witnesses. At time of writing, plaintiffs’ appeals against the decision remained pending, as did the request from the prosecutor to strip the judge of immunity and charge her with malfeasance and denial of justice. The same judge had reached a similar decision in the CREOMPAZ case, involving enforced disappearances and sexual violence at a military base during Guatemala’s internal armed conflict. The judge excluded...more
Aug. 31, 2020, 6:14 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"In June, in a case regarding sexual violence against 36 Maya Achí women in the 1980s, a pretrial judge dismissed proceedings against six former paramilitaries and ordered the immediate release of the defendants after she excluded key evidence from the case, including testimonies from victims and witnesses. At time of writing, plaintiffs’ appeals against the decision remained pending, as did the request from the prosecutor to strip the judge of immunity and charge her with malfeasance and denial of justice" (para 8)
Aug. 30, 2020, 8:39 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-1, GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Human Rights Watch and other organizations documented a system of organized rape, sexual slavery, and forced marriage by ISIS forces of Yezidi women and girls from 2014 to 2017. However, no ISIS member in Iraq has been prosecuted or convicted for those specific crimes" (para 32).
June 24, 2020, 8:17 p.m.
Countries: Belgium
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Belgium has asserted universal jurisdiction for crimes committed in the DRC that did not involved Belgian nationals as either perpetrators or victims."
June 6, 2020, 7:24 p.m.
Countries: Australia
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

“The last time Australian law and justice agencies drew on our own war crimes legislation was for the charging and extradition of 'Captain Dragan' Vasiljkovic. Prosecutors in that case used video footage recorded by a journalist in which the accused boasted of his command of troops that massacred the Croatian and Muslim population of the town of Glina. In 2009, the Australian Supreme Court found that Vasiljkovic had committed torture and rape during the war. Croatian authorities have now sentenced him to 15 years in prison for war crimes.”
May 31, 2020, 11:21 a.m.
Countries: Libya
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Migrant women and girls [in Libya] are particularly vulnerable to rape and other forms of conflict related sexual violence. Many are exposed to forced prostitution and sexual exploitation in conditions amounting to sexual slavery. Many Nigerian women and girls are particularly vulnerable to trafficking by armed groups and/or multinational criminal networks, reporting that they were detained in “connection houses” in Tripoli and in Sabha and subjected to sexual abuse by uniformed armed men (see S/2018/812 and S/2018/812/Corr.1). Since Libya lacks anti-trafficking legislation or systems to identify and protect survivors, these women and girls fear prosecution and do not report their experiences to Libyan authorities."
April 30, 2020, 9:29 a.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The outcome of the Guatemalan genocide trial will hold significant weight and will hopefully set a high precedent in how war crimes are handled in the future. Various women stated that they made the decision to share their stories because they want justice and to ensure that these crimes never happens again. One woman stated, 'I’m glad to be here testifying today, that the law is with us today. If justice is done, I thank you' (NISGUA Blog)" (para 10-11).
April 1, 2020, 6:28 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"If the accused is an adult man, he normally appears before the jirga in person to defend his case. Parents normally represent their minor children, and men normally represent their female relatives" (10). "In 2015 the Supreme Court suspended the death sentence of Asia Bibi, a Christian woman convicted of blasphemy in 2010, pending its decision on her appeal. Bibi had been on death row since 2010 after a district court found her guilty of making derogatory remarks about the Prophet Muhammed during an argument. Her lawyers appealed to the Supreme Court in 2014. The appeal was due to be heard in October 2016 but was delayed after one member...more
March 24, 2020, 3:35 p.m.
Countries: Central African Rep
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"'Our soldiers did not get involved in such unprofessional behavior,' said a military spokesman, Brig. Richard Karemire. 'We don’t have one' case. Similarly, the American Special Operations forces partnering with the Ugandans in the fight against the Lord’s Resistance Army denied any 'direct knowledge of any sexual misconduct by U.P.D.F. forces,' according to Brig. Gen. Donald C. Bolduc, who commands American Special Operations in Africa. A United States State Department official said, however, that American diplomats did discuss the allegations with military and civilian leaders in Uganda, who promised that 'any soldiers responsible for such acts would be repatriated and prosecuted.'" (12-14). "The women and girls entered the Ugandan headquarters...more
Jan. 30, 2020, 1:06 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Recalling its general comment No. 3 (2012), the Committee urges the State party to take immediate and effective legislative and administrative measures to find a victim- centred resolution for the issues of “comfort women”, in particular, by: Publicly acknowledging legal responsibility for the crimes of sexual slavery, and prosecuting and punishing perpetrators with appropriate penalties; Refuting attempts to deny the facts by government authorities and public figures and to re-traumatize the victims through such repeated denials; Disclosing related materials, and investigating the facts thoroughly; Recognizing the victim’s right to redress, and accordingly providing them full and effective redress and reparation, including compensation, satisfaction and the means for as full rehabilitation...more
July 31, 2019, 6:50 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"SCC officials sometimes prevented individuals from attending trial sessions for seemingly trivial reasons, such as banning female relatives or diplomats from attending due to the absence of women officers to conduct security inspections of the women upon entry to the courtroom" (17). "The government generally did not restrict the free movement of male citizens within the country, but it severely restricted the movement of female citizens. While the guardianship system does not require a woman to have the permission of her male guardian (normally a father, husband, son, brother, grandfather, uncle, or other male relative) to move freely within the country, courts sometimes ruled that women should abide by a...more
June 8, 2019, 1:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Civil, criminal, and commercial courts accord equal weight to the testimony of men and women. In sharia courts, which have jurisdiction over Muslim marriage, divorce, and inheritance cases, the testimony of one man equals that of two women" (10).
April 19, 2019, 9:51 a.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Basic Training Programme and the Programme of professional training for judges and prosecutors in FBIH includes training in proceeding the war crime cases of rape and sexual abuse, and manual 'War Sexual Violence' was created" (11). "In both entities, civilian victims of war, including survivors of wartime sexual violence, continue to face a different treatment compared to disabled veterans of war. This is manifested in considerably lower fees - often in the amount of 70 per cent of the maximum monthly allowance allocated to the war-disabled military personnel. The effect of stigma on overall efforts to provide assistance and support to survivors cannot be ignored" (13).
March 21, 2019, 11:12 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"While the majority of accounts concerned male detainees, there were increased reports of female detainees suffering abuse in government custody" (para 27).
March 13, 2019, 7:37 p.m.
Countries: Colombia
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Having regard to Recommendation 18(h), the Protocol for the Prevention of Gender-based Violence had a second version, published in 2015 and titled Security Forces Protocol on Sexual Violence Prevention and Response, Particularly in Relation to the Armed Conflict, with technical support from the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and contributions by the Presidential Council for Human Rights and the Presidential Council for Women’s Equity. It formalizes the path to be taken in cases of sexual violence related to the armed conflict as well as the obligation to bring alleged sexual violence cases to the attention of the...more
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The law provides for due process, and defendants enjoy a presumption of innocence. While authorities informed defendants of the charges/accusations against them and provided them with free interpretation services as required, the quality of these services was generally poor, and defendants did not learn of the charges until the investigation was complete. Defendants have the right to a public trial, although juries are not used. They also have the right to be present during trial. All defendants, including the indigent, have the right to legal counsel, but authorities rarely respected this entitlement. Likewise, defendants may confront or question witnesses and present witnesses and evidence in both civil and criminal cases....more
March 6, 2019, 7:48 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"In some cases authorities wrongfully imprisoned women because they deemed it unsafe for the women to return home or because women’s shelters were not available to provide protection in the provinces or districts at issue. The law provides a defendant the right to object to his or her pretrial detention and receive a court hearing on the matter, but authorities generally did not observe this requirement" (6). "Police and legal officials often charged women with intent to commit zina to justify their arrest and incarceration for social offenses, such as running away from home, rejecting a spouse chosen by her family, fleeing domestic violence or rape, or eloping. The constitution...more
March 3, 2019, 8:50 p.m.
Countries: Zimbabwe
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"'All women, who were allegedly raped, are encouraged to come forward and report the cases to the Zimbabwe Republic Police Victim Friendly Unit,' Information Minister Monica Mutsvangwa said. 'The unit is led by a female commissioner, hence, all affected women will be treated with empathy, compassion, respect and due care. Their safety will be guaranteed,' she added" (para 10-11).
March 1, 2019, 11:52 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Legislation also addresses the issue of violence against women in penitentiary and correctional institutions by providing for the protection and proper treatment of women and respect for their privacy as women. Provisions of that nature are contained in the Penitentiary and Correctional Institutions Act (No. 3 of 2009) and its implementing regulations" (25).
Jan. 11, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-2, GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The Ministry sources said the woman was married and having children in Sri Lanka, when she had convicted for adultery with a Sri Lankan youth employed in Saudi Arabia. After she was produced before the Riyad Court, the woman had pleaded guilty and she was sentenced to be stoned to death according to Saudi Arabian law. The youth who had having the affair with Lankan woman had been given 100 lashes as punishment, Foreign Employment Minister Thalatha Athukorala’s Media Secretary Nalin Rajapaksha said" (para 2-4).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Closely related to the relegation of women students to the background was their complaint of being infantilised by female hall wardens, who enforced regulations on visiting periods, 'morality,' dress codes and 'loitering' around the hall by 'ladies.' That male students were subjected to less authoritarian treatment by their male wardens and hall supervisors was resented and seen as sexist" (para 14).
Dec. 1, 2018, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"For the first time ever, a Bosnian court has ordered two former Bosnian Serb soldiers who raped a Croat woman during the 1992-1995 war to pay monetary compensation to the victim. The two soldiers -- Bosiljko Markovic and Ostoja Markovic -- were also sentenced to 10 years in prison by the court on Wednesday, according to media reports. The two soldiers were reportedly ordered to pay 26,500 Bosnian marka (approximately $15,200) to the victim (para 1, 2). "Although Bosnian courts have, in the past, prosecuted and jailed several war criminals for sexual violence during the war, they have directed victims to pursue compensation claims in expensive civil procedures -- a...more
Nov. 16, 2018, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Articles 343(b) and 445 of the Constitution grant the military complete independence over its own affairs, effectively placing military crimes outside the civilian justice system. Both the Government’s claims of equal rights for women under the Constitution and the criminalization of assault and insult are rendered moot, since many acts of gender-based violence are perpetrated by military personnel, and thus are outside the reach of the civilian justice system. Typically, victims of crimes perpetrated by the military are offered minimal compensation as quid pro quo for not going to court or are threatened or intimidated into keeping silent. When a complaint is brought against soldiers, a military commander intervenes and...more
Nov. 9, 2018, 11:06 a.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The Committee is particularly concerned about reports that repatriated women are detained… and deprived of their right to a fair trial" (12).
Oct. 4, 2018, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Virginity examinations” are a routine part of criminal proceedings in Afghanistan. When women or girls are accused of “moral crimes” such as sex outside of marriage, police, prosecutors, and judges regularly send them to government doctors. After examining them, the doctors submit reports reaching conclusions about whether they are “virgins,” also often drawing more detailed – and often damning – conclusions about their sexual histories. These reports are used in court as evidence and have led to long prison terms for many women" (para 2).
March 19, 2018, 8:20 a.m.
Countries: Colombia
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The reform to military criminal justice, adopted in December 2012, according to which human rights violations, such as violence against women (other than sexual violence) and arbitrary detentions, among others, will be handled by military courts; and the negative impact of the reform on the investigative process and the treatment of victims. The adoption in November 2012 of a law enforcement agencies protocol for the management of sexual violence with emphasis on sexual violence in instances of armed conflict, which gives authority to the military to deal directly with and assist victims of sexual violence" (Pg 6).
Jan. 31, 2018, 6:14 p.m.
Countries: Burkina Faso
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The Committee is concerned that […] the High Council for Reconciliation and National Unity is not fully operational resulting in delays in investigating allegations of gender-based violence against women and girls by security forces and terrorist groups" (4).
Dec. 14, 2017, 10:13 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The two families sought guidance from the local Jirga, a council composed of tribal elders that usually rules in favor of men. The Jirga, trying to reduce further bloodshed, decided that Spogmai should be handed over to the family as compensation for the killing" (para 8). "Violence against women in Afghan is rarely prosecuted. Civil society and women’s rights groups are still reeling from the March 2015 murder of a 27-year-old woman in broad daylight in central Kabul, by a mob of men who falsely accused her of burning the Koran. The brutal killing of Farkhunda – and the disappointing legal process that followed – became a turning point in...more