The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for IM-DATA-2

June 9, 2021, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Poland
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"The second most numerous group of causes includes inborn defects and external reasons. Inborn defects are more likely to affect girls – over one fourth of all cases, and their rate is by almost 5 per cent higher among girls than among boys, whereas the rate of external death causes is by nearly 3 per cent higher among boys" (63).
Feb. 10, 2021, 10:34 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"The economists found that while officials report roughly 740 deaths on average every year due to typhoon exposure in the Philippines, post-typhoon mortality among baby girls is approximately 15 times higher than that, likely due to the indirect poverty-worsening effects of the storm. Because the Philippines is so hard hit by typhoons every year, the authors estimate that these delayed infant deaths account for approximately 13 percent of the country’s overall infant mortality rate" (para 3). "The risk of a baby girl dying after a typhoon doubles if she has older sisters in the home, and the risk doubles again if the she has older brothers – suggesting that the...more
Jan. 31, 2021, 1:58 p.m.
Countries: Angola
Variables: DACH-DATA-1, IM-DATA-1, IM-DATA-2

“The most recent results recorded in the country indicate progress: life expectancy increased from 48 years for both sexes in 2009 to 60 years in 2014; infant mortality fell from 116 per 1,000 live births in 2009 to 44; and under-5 child mortality decreased from 194 to 68 in 2015. The number of pregnancy-related deaths among women aged 15–49 is 239 deaths per 100,000 live births” (pp. 38).
July 19, 2020, 1:45 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are more likely than girls to die in the first month of their lives. Mortality rates are 24 deaths per 1,000 live births among male neonates and 17 deaths per 1,000 live births among female neonates. As children grow older, girls are more likely to die than boys. For instance, under-5 mortality rates are 41 deaths per 1,000 live births among girls and 36 deaths per 1,000 live births among boys" (143).
July 3, 2020, 4:25 p.m.
Countries: Zambia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"The 2018 ZDHS results show that mortality rates are lower among female children than among their male counterparts, with differences of at least 10 deaths per 1,000 live births for all three indicators (neonatal mortality: 22 versus 33; infant mortality: 36 versus 48; under-5 mortality: 53 versus 67)" (123).
May 31, 2020, 6:36 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are slightly more likely to die before their fifth birthday than girls. The gender gap is most pronounced in the neonatal period (within one month after birth)" (187).
May 15, 2020, 7:15 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are more likely than girls to die in childhood. The difference is particularly pronounced for the under-5 mortality rate (137 male deaths per 1,000 live births versus 127 female deaths per 1,000 live births)" (166).
May 12, 2020, 10:21 a.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"With the exception of postneonatal mortality, mortality rates are higher among male than female children. Overall, under-5 mortality is 21 deaths per 1,000 live births among male children and 17 deaths per 1,000 live births among female children" (pg 135).
April 19, 2020, 11:08 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are more likely than girls to die in the first month of their lives. Mortality rates were 52 deaths per 1,000 live births among male neonates and 33 deaths per 1,000 live births among female neonates. Similarly, under-5 mortality rates are 80 deaths per 1,000 live births among boys and 68 deaths per 1,000 live births among girls" (147). Table 8.2 details Five-year early childhood mortality rates according to background characteristics for the 5-year period preceding the survey, all given as number of deaths per 1,000 live births. The neonatal mortality rate was 52 for males and 33 for females. The post-neonatal mortality rate was 19 for males and...more
April 14, 2020, 5:17 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"In general, mortality is higher among male children than among female children" (121).
March 29, 2020, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Maldives
Variables: IM-DATA-2

The table titled "Sustainable Development Goals Indicators" shows the mortality rates for infants and children. The under-five mortality rate is 24 males versus 16 females per 1,000 live births. The neonatal mortality rate is 13 males versus 10 females per 1,000 live births (xxix). "Childhood mortality rates are consistently higher for boys than girls, which is a universal phenomenon" (108).
Feb. 8, 2020, 7:27 p.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"There are male/female differentials across all mortality rates. For example, infant mortality rates are 41 deaths per 1,000 live births among boys and 29 deaths per 1,000 live births among girls, and under-5 mortality rates are 49 deaths per 1,000 live births among boys and 35 deaths per 1,000 live births among girls" (119).
Feb. 5, 2020, 5:50 p.m.
Countries: East Timor
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"There exists a far greater male/female differential (24 and 13 neonatal deaths per 1,000 live births) in neonatal mortality rates than in urban/rural neonatal rates (18 and 19 neonatal deaths per 1,000 live births) (Table 8.2)" (pg 118). "There exists a far greater urban/rural differential in post-neonatal mortality rates (7 and 13 post-neonatal deaths per 1,000 live births) than in male/female post-neonatal rates (11 and 12 post-neonatal deaths per 1,000 live births)" (pg 118).
Aug. 21, 2019, 10:15 p.m.
Countries: Zimbabwe
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are more likely to die in childhood than girls. The gender gap is seen across all mortality rates" (134).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are more likely than girls to die in childhood. The gender gap is most pronounced during the first month of life (28 deaths per 1,000 live births among boys and 21 deaths per 1,000 live births among girls)" (129).
May 10, 2019, 3:08 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"No male-female differentials are observed in mortality rates (Table 8.2)" (104).
March 1, 2019, 9:06 a.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are more likely to die in early childhood than girls. The under-5 mortality rate is 40 deaths per 1,000 live births among boys and 26 deaths per 1,000 live births among girls" (109).
Feb. 1, 2019, 2:36 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are more likely to die in childhood than girls. The gender gap is most pronounced in the neonatal period (within 1 month after birth), when male children are nearly twice as likely as female children to die (49 deaths compared with 26 deaths, per 1,000 live births, respectively)" (125).
Oct. 19, 2018, 10:12 p.m.
Countries: Comoros
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Results by sex of the child show that under-five mortality rates are somewhat higher for female infants compared to male infants (52 per 1000 compared to 48 per 1000). It is between the first birthday and the fifth birthday that this gap is most significant (15 per 1000 compared to 9 per 1000)" (page 176).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:30 a.m.
Countries: Switzerland
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"There were no cases brought to court in 2014. According to government estimates, there were approximately 14,700 women and girls, primarily from Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Egypt, living in the country who were affected by, or at risk of, FGM/C...In February 2014 the women’s human rights organization Terre des Femmes, in conjunction with the Federal Office of Public Health, published an assessment of FGM/C in the country. The report stated that FGM/C affected approximately 13,000 migrant women and girls in 2013" (15).
May 31, 2018, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Differences in mortality rate by sex show the expected pattern of higher mortality for boys than girls, particularly in the neonatal period" (page 160).
April 11, 2018, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Burkina Faso
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Infant mortality is higher among boys than among girls" (30).
Jan. 8, 2018, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Male children are more likely to die in early childhood than female children. The under-5 mortality rate for male children is 78 deaths per 1,000 live births and for female children is 66 deaths per 1,000 live births" (113).
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:08 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Bangladesh has achieved some progress in the health sector and has been successful in raising the average life expectation of its population. However, the situation of female health is still poor. The difference of child mortality between male and female is very high, where female child mortality is higher than that of their male counterparts. The child mortality in case of male was 46.7 per thousand live births in 1993-94, which has decreased to 16 per thousand live births in 2007 with an annual average decreasing rate of 2.19 per thousand live births. On the other hand, for female, it was 62.3 per thousand live births in 1993-94, which has...more
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:08 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“Boys are more likely to die in childhood than girls. The gender gap is most pronounced in the postneonatal period (between 1 month and12 months)” (117).
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“As expected, neonatal mortality is higher among boys than girls (31 deaths and 26 deaths per 1,000 live births, respectively) as by nature from the time of conception, boy babies are more vulnerable than girl babies. All other mortality rates, except neonatal mortality, are higher for girls than for boys” (105). “With the exception of the 2004 and 2007 BDHS, all BDHS surveys reported both higher postneonatal and child mortality for girls than for boys—a pattern that has been observed in other countries of South Asia where strong son preference is thought to result in relative nutritional and medical neglect of girl children (Das Gupta 1987; Basu 1989)” (105). “The...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 4:05 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“As noted in earlier DHS surveys, mortality rates are generally higher among male children than female children. This is true for all categories of mortality. With the exception of mothers in the 40-49 age group, infant mortality is higher for mothers under age 20 than for older mothers” (122).
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“In general, female children experience lower mortality than male children at all ages, with under-five mortality rates of 58 and 79 deaths per 1,000, respectively” (102).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:55 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“As noted in earlier DHS surveys, mortality rates are generally higher among male children than female children. This is true for all categories of mortality. With the exception of mothers in the 40-49 age group, infant mortality is higher for mothers under age 20 than for older mothers” (122).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:53 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IM-DATA-2

“In general, female children experience lower mortality than male children at all ages, with under-five mortality rates of 58 and 79 deaths per 1,000, respectively” (102).