The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for LDS-LAW-1

April 26, 2021, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Transnational inter-sectoral Action to fight against trafficking for labour exploitation, focussed on the identification and assistance to victims,...analyse the informal labour of migrants, slavery-like labour, best practices and information/training processes for relevant stakeholders. The resources allocated to this end amount to 438,000.00 Euros" (49). "the...measures for women immigrants who face family, work, social or economic difficulties: a) shelters facilities for women and their children; b) socio-economic measures, including education, vocational training and access to the labour market, as well as protection measures against any forms of discrimination, based on gender, ethnicity and race; c) programmes facilitating the access to public services, also through cultural mediators; d) awareness-raising campaigns on various...more
Dec. 31, 2020, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: LDS-LAW-1, NGOFW-PRACTICE-1

"Girls Court brings an all-hands-on-deck approach to the lives of vulnerable girls, linking them to social service agencies, providing informal Saturday sessions on everything from body image to legal jargon, and offering a team of adults in whom they can develop trust" (para 5).
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Vanuatu
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government continued prosecution of the country’s first trafficking case and provided some victim support services. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government did not initiate any additional trafficking investigations during the reporting period, nor did it conduct public awareness campaigns or administer systematic anti-trafficking training for its law enforcement officials. Contrary to a victim-centered protection approach, in the aforementioned ongoing case, the government forced some victims to stay in the country for the duration of the prosecution without allowing them to earn an income, possibly increasing their indebtedness and vulnerability to re-trafficking upon repatriation."
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Rwanda
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Rwanda remained on Tier 2. These efforts included identifying more victims, developing a national referral mechanism, drafting and dispersing a directory of service providers for victims, and increasing national awareness campaigns. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government investigated fewer trafficking crimes and prosecuted and convicted fewer traffickers compared to the previous year. The government did not convict any traffickers for sex trafficking, despite the crime’s presence in the country. The government did not operate long-term care facilities for referred victims."
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Mongolia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"These efforts included convicting significantly more traffickers and identifying more victims than the previous reporting period. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. Authorities did not identify any foreign or male victims, nor did they dedicate sufficient resources toward establishing standard identification or referral procedures. With the exception of forced child begging cases prosecuted under laws carrying insufficient penalties, officials did not detect or initiate any investigations or prosecutions of forced labor."
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore the Solomon Islands remained on Tier 2. These efforts included advancing its first two trafficking prosecutions initiated in the previous reporting period with one resulting in a conviction. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. General lack of awareness of the crime and applicable legislation among front-line officers, coupled with under-resourced protection services and widespread observance of informal justice models, continued to exacerbate the government’s slow response to trafficking cases. Victim protection services remained inadequate, and the government did not develop urgently needed standard operating procedures for victim identification."more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Sierra Leone was upgraded to Tier 2. These efforts included convicting traffickers for the first time in 15 years; significantly increasing investigations and prosecutions; significantly increasing trainings for officials on trafficking; contributing a facility for an NGO to establish a shelter for victims; and establishing district-level anti- trafficking task forces."
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Guinea-Bissau
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The absence of a specific law against child abuse, fear of reprisals, cultural practices, impunity and the slowness of justice make of Guinea-Bissau a safe haven for sexual abuse and child exploitation."
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"These efforts included significantly increasing national awareness-raising efforts, specifically addressing vulnerable populations; training more front-line responders across the country; and prosecuting all confirmed cases of trafficking. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government did not proactively identify trafficking victims other than those represented by criminal cases. The government did not adopt its national action plan, hindering the implementation of regulations for trafficking victim and witness protection. Additionally, the government did not finalize a draft national referral mechanism for a third consecutive year, which may have limited victims’ access to protective services. Mozambican officials remained without effective policies or laws that would regulate...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Chad
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Illiteracy affects more than two out of three people in Chad (UNICEF, 2010), while only 40% of over‐15s could read and write French or Arabic (48% of men compared with only 32% of women) in 2015 (UNESCO, 2015). This means that people's knowledge of the legislative framework that officially condemns discrimination and violence on the basis of gender is limited. It also prevents women from claiming their rights and constrains their equitable representation in politics. The National Assembly has only 24 women deputies, out of 188 (less than 13%) (IPU, 2017), which may explain in part why issues of equality and women's rights are not treated as a priority. The...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: D R Congo
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The law in DRC does nor criminalise prostitution itself, but its exploitation. Because of the significant gap between acts forbidden by law and other regulatory texts and the reality on the ground, the state has no role in regulating this sector effectively. This leaves women largely deprived of medical services and unprotected against police or military abuse...[This brings about a legal approach to sex among minors that seems to disable social discussion and education..."" (p. vii)"
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Slovakia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Slovakia remained on Tier 2. These efforts included increasing prosecutions and convictions, and extraditing more suspected traffickers. The government also increased cooperation on international investigations, which resulted in the identification of victims and the conviction of traffickers abroad. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government did not adequately and proactively identify foreign or domestic trafficking victims within the country, it decreased overall investigations, and it decreased efforts to identify labor trafficking victims through joint-inspections. The high number of suspended sentences for trafficking convictions, with only 45 percent of convicted...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"There were no laws or policies to protect victims from prosecution for unlawful acts traffickers compelled them to commit. Security forces continued to lack a formal mechanism to identify potential victims, resulting in officials indiscriminately arresting individuals in commercial sex without screening, including known child sex trafficking victims. The government did not provide specialized services for trafficking victims or legal alternatives to the removal of foreign victims to countries where they would face hardship or retribution, nor did it offer legal assistance or other mechanisms to encourage victims to assist in the investigation and prosecution of trafficking crimes."
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Government of Trinidad and Tobago does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Trinidad and Tobago remained on Tier 2. These efforts included screening and identifying more victims, investigating traffickers, including three potentially complicit officials, prosecuting eight suspected traffickers, and increasing anti-trafficking training for its officials. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government had yet to secure a conviction under its 2011 anti- trafficking law, funding for victim assistance was reduced, and the laws did...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Turkmenistan
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Despite the lack of significant efforts, the government took some steps to address trafficking, including approving the 2020-2022 national action plan, continuing to participate in anti- trafficking awareness campaigns, working with international organizations on combating trafficking in persons, providing training to its diplomatic corps on human trafficking, identifying potential trafficking victims at the international airport, and continuing to purchase machinery to mechanize cotton harvesting and planting. However, during the reporting period, there was a government policy or pattern of forced labor; the government continued to direct policies that perpetuated the continued mobilization of adult citizens for forced labor in the annual cotton harvest and in public works projects. No officials...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Luxembourg
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

The government continued to demonstrate serious and sustained efforts during the reporting period; therefore Luxembourg remained on Tier 1. These efforts included increasing resources for victim assistance, increasing anti-trafficking training to all police recruits, increasing labor inspectors in the field, strengthening international anti-trafficking cooperation, and adopting a new action plan focused on responsible supply chains. Although the government meets minimum standards, the number of investigations and prosecutions declined, and courts continue to fully suspend prison sentences for convicted traffickers, creating potential safety problems for trafficking victims, weakening deterrence, and undercutting nationwide efforts to fight trafficking.
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"These efforts included collaborating with an international organization to establish an anti-trafficking database and planning the third phase of its program to remove vulnerable children, including trafficking victims, from the streets of major cities. In addition, the government launched an emergency campaign to place vulnerable children living in the street, including forced begging victims, in shelters in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the government did not demonstrate overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period. The government rarely proactively investigated or prosecuted traffickers exploiting children in forced begging and did not take action against officials who refused to investigate such cases. The government only applied adequate prison terms...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: East Timor
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"As the Alola Foundation was the sole national actor dedicated to combating human trafficking, in 2008, the Inter-Agency Human Trafficking Group started to discuss sustainable and coordinated actions involving different actors. The National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking (NAPCHT), presented in September 2009, was followed by the draft of the Law against Trafficking in Persons (LATP) in 2011. The lack of reliable data and management system has also been an obstacle for capturing a clear idea of the extent of GBV and human trafficking in the country. The government has been mandated to establish a uniform data collection system to comply with the CEDAW General Recommendation. Articles 8, 16,...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Suriname
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Surinamese women in neighboring countries are at risk of sex trafficking. Traffickers may transport victims through routes in Suriname’s interior that bypass official checkpoints. There are reports of corruption and local official complicity in trafficking crimes that may impede anti-trafficking efforts..." "The Government of Suriname does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Suriname remained on Tier 2. These efforts included increasing law enforcement training, developing a formal victim referral process, increasing funding to the national action plan budget, and government leadership committing to anti-trafficking...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Cuba
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Vulnerable adolescents (e.g. those living with HIV, street youth, adolescents with disabilities, LGBTQ youth, and adolescents engaged in sex work) require special support and services but are often stigmatised and face barriers in accessing services. There is little evidence about access to SRH services among these vulnerable youth groups in Cuba...The Cuban government has used TV shows and radio call-in programmes to promote messages about gender equality and SRH, though little is known about their impact and public perceptions of these campaigns and whether they influence social norms." (Page 11)
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Nicaragua
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

Despite the lack of significant efforts, the government took some steps to address trafficking, including identifying slightly more victims than in the previous reporting period and prosecuting a trafficker. However, the government did not convict any traffickers, and victim identification efforts remained inadequate. The government did not report any investigations, prosecutions, or convictions of government employees complicit in trafficking offenses, despite endemic official corruption and widespread complicity. The government did not cooperate with NGOs in the national anti-trafficking coalition or the provision of victim services. Prosecution, protection, and prevention efforts in the two Caribbean autonomous regions of Nicaragua continued to be much weaker than in the rest of the country.more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Central African Rep
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The National Committee to Combat Practices Harmful to Women and Girls was established by ministerial order in 1997. It constitutes the basis of one of the priority areas of the National Plan of Action to combat all forms of discrimination against women. The Committee’s mandate, exercised through a multi-sectoral and comprehensive approach in partnership with the Education and Health Ministries and NGOs, is to take concrete measures to prevent and eliminate violence against wome n and girls, improve awareness of situations of violence, secure application of the provisions of CEDAW, furnish legal, medical and social support to women victims of violence, and publicize the legal instruments. The measures taken by...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Papua New Guinea
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government again did not provide or fund protective services for victims, nor did it systematically implement its victim identification procedures. Endemic corruption among officials, particularly in the logging sector, continued to facilitate vulnerability to sex trafficking and forced labor among foreign and local populations. Since the enactment of the 2013 law, the government has not achieved a single trafficking conviction. An acute lack of financial and human resources dedicated to anti-trafficking efforts, as well as very low awareness among government officials and the public, hindered progress."
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Eritrea
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The Government of Eritrea does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking and is not making significant efforts to do so; therefore Eritrea remained on Tier 3. Despite the lack of significant efforts, during the reporting year the government engaged in critical bilateral and multilateral partnerships to build its capacity for anti-trafficking initiatives. Officials also co-hosted with an international organization targeted training seminars for key government stakeholders and commenced contribution to a regional plan of action on combating trafficking. However, during the reporting period there was a government policy or pattern of forced labor. The government continued to exploit its nationals in forced labor in its...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"Despite the lack of significant efforts, the government took some steps to address trafficking, including conducting awareness-raising activities in partnership with an international organization and an NGO, continuing to participate in a regional data collection tool, and training 27 diplomats on trafficking in persons. However, the government did not investigate or prosecute any potential trafficking cases for the second consecutive year and did not convict any traffickers for the fourth consecutive year. Despite serious concerns of official complicity in trafficking crimes, which appeared to restrict all law enforcement actions during the reporting period, the government did not report any investigations, prosecutions, or convictions of government officials for such acts. The...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Serbia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government adopted standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the identification, referral, and support of trafficking victims and adopted the 2019-2020 national action plan, and allocated resources towards the plan. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. Proactive identification efforts remained inadequate and, as a result, the government identified the fewest number of victims since 2015. Authorities failed to discipline complicit officials, and the Center for Protection of Trafficking Victims (CPTV) lacked resources and staff necessary to assess victims, coordinate care placement, and provide direct assistance at the URC. The government continued to penalize victims, and authorities did not protect victims’ rights during court proceedings....more
Oct. 14, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Croatia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"A New Juvenile Courts Act was adopted (Official Gazette, no. 84/11, 143/12, 148/13) and the Police Act (Official Gazette, no. 34/11, 130/12). In 2005, the Government of the RC adopted the Protocol for procedure in cases of domestic violence, and in 2006 its amendments, in 2008 the Protocol for identification, assistance to and protection of victims of trafficking in human beings, in 2009 the Protocol on procedure in the voluntary return of victims of trafficking in human beings, in 2011 the Protocol for procedure in cases of hate crimes, and in 2012 the Protocol on procedure in cases of sexual violence. A large number of measures have been systematically implemented,...more
Oct. 14, 2020, 8:27 a.m.
Countries: Vanuatu
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government continued prosecution of the country’s first trafficking case and provided some victim support services. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government did not initiate any additional trafficking investigations during the reporting period, nor did it conduct public awareness campaigns or administer systematic anti-trafficking training for its law enforcement officials. Contrary to a victim-centered protection approach, in the aforementioned ongoing case, the government forced some victims to stay in the country for the duration of the prosecution without allowing them to earn an income, possibly increasing their indebtedness and vulnerability to re-trafficking upon repatriation."
Oct. 14, 2020, 8:27 a.m.
Countries: Rwanda
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Rwanda remained on Tier 2. These efforts included identifying more victims, developing a national referral mechanism, drafting and dispersing a directory of service providers for victims, and increasing national awareness campaigns. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government investigated fewer trafficking crimes and prosecuted and convicted fewer traffickers compared to the previous year. The government did not convict any traffickers for sex trafficking, despite the crime’s presence in the country. The government did not operate long-term care facilities for referred victims."
Oct. 14, 2020, 8:27 a.m.
Countries: Mongolia
Variables: LDS-LAW-1

"These efforts included convicting significantly more traffickers and identifying more victims than the previous reporting period. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. Authorities did not identify any foreign or male victims, nor did they dedicate sufficient resources toward establishing standard identification or referral procedures. With the exception of forced child begging cases prosecuted under laws carrying insufficient penalties, officials did not detect or initiate any investigations or prosecutions of forced labor."