The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for LDS-PRACTICE-2

Sept. 13, 2021, 2:24 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Some locally licensed employment agencies [in Hong Kong] were suspected of colluding with agencies overseas to profit from debt schemes, and some local agencies illegally confiscated the passports and employment contracts of domestic workers and withheld them until they repaid the debt" (129).
Aug. 6, 2021, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Pamela Mbogo* is one of them. The 29-year-old has found a job in Saudi Arabia starting next month. It’s not her first time as a domestic worker. On the previous occasion she lived and worked for a family in Bahrain, where she was abused and locked inside the house for days at a time. Yet, this time, Mbogo believes it will be different. 'The first time I went, I went in an illegal, chaotic situation through brokers who did not prepare us for what lay ahead,' says Mbogo. 'I am more confident this time. I believe all will be well'" (para 2-3). "She says that she sees the cycle repeating...more
Aug. 6, 2021, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Despite the Kenyan government’s claim that the Saudi government had agreed a minimum wage, workers still report to Adhoch that they are earning as little as 18 000 Kenyan shillings — if they get paid at all" (para 21). "Only a broken leg allowed Shani Hassan* to escape to Kenya when she took a job in Saudi Arabia just before the ban was put in place. She was allowed to sleep for only two hours a night, and given little more than noodles to eat. After more than a year of abuse, her employer’s son threw Hassan down the stairs, breaking her leg, leaving her unable to work. Finally, she...more
Aug. 6, 2021, 12:58 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Pamela Mbogo* is one of them. The 29-year-old has found a job in Saudi Arabia starting next month. It’s not her first time as a domestic worker. On the previous occasion she lived and worked for a family in Bahrain, where she was abused and locked inside the house for days at a time. Yet, this time, Mbogo believes it will be different. 'The first time I went, I went in an illegal, chaotic situation through brokers who did not prepare us for what lay ahead,' says Mbogo. 'I am more confident this time. I believe all will be well'" (para 2-3). "Reports of east African workers being raped and...more
July 13, 2021, 1:26 p.m.
Countries: Cyprus
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The law prohibits sexual harassment in the workplace and provides a penalty of up to six months in prison and/or a 12,000 euro ($14,440) fine. The ombudsman and NGOs reported that authorities did not investigate sexual harassment complaints submitted by foreign domestic workers" (p 15-16). "The Department of Labor reported that it received five sexual harassment complaints from foreign domestic workers. Three of them withdrew their complaint after the employer agreed to release them from their contract and were free to change employer. The department was investigating the remaining two complaints" (p 24).
June 29, 2021, 3:43 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Migrant workers are governed by the “kafala” system, which requires workers to have a sponsor. This sponsor then holds their passport, which makes it impossible for them to flee" (para 5). "Lots of women who are employed as domestic workers are mistreated. Often, they can’t stand the treatment and the terrible working conditions and so they run away. They end up without papers" (para 14). "There are also cases when employers beat their domestic workers, kill them and bury them somewhere, but we have no way of verifying" (para 17). "However, people rarely go to the police to report human trafficking and investigations are rarely completed, says Rima Kalush, the...more
June 29, 2021, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Migrant domestic workers in Lebanon are facing physical and mental abuse at the hands of their employers because of the country's use of the 'kafala' sponsorship system, a new report has revealed... [Amnesty International] has exposed a pattern of abuse faced by maids working and living inside Lebanon. Testimony collected by Amnesty from 32 female domestic workers, recruitment agencies and diplomats for the 'Their House is My Prison' report showed workers faced having their passports confiscated, salaries withheld and restrictions on their movement and food" (para 1-3). "The vast majority of workers who travel to Lebanon for employment using the kafala system come from deprived backgrounds and are often unaware...more
May 22, 2021, 7:58 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"'My agent told me he could take my passport because he had bought me,' she says. 'I was confused. How can you buy a human being?' At 5am, a few hours after she arrived, she was woken by her new employer who ordered her to clean the house and then get his children ready for school. 'This is not the work I came to Oman for,' she says. 'My agent in Sierra Leone lied to me.' The kafala system of employment still ties migrant workers to the employer who brings them to the Gulf, allowing widespread exploitation to persist, despite years of campaigning by human rights groups" (para 2-4). "Now...more
April 26, 2021, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"women immigrants remain the most exposed to both domestic violence and harassment at the workplace, as long as they are legally or economically subjected either to their spouses or fathers or to their employers" (75). "Women who suffered or continue to suffer from various forms of violence, especially sexual offenses and mobbing...It is also growing the violence grounded on cultural reasons, especially among immigrant women. As to the latter, the latest figures indicate the reduction of complaints despite the nondecrease of cases of violence" (84).
March 6, 2021, 9:44 p.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Many low-paid migrant domestic workers are at acute risk of labor abuses, forced labor, and human trafficking because of the kafala (visa sponsorship) system in the UAE, which ties migrant workers’ visas to their employers" (para 16).
Feb. 13, 2021, 10:58 p.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2

“J. and Others v. Austria (no. 58216/12) (17 January 2017): This case concerned the Austrian authorities’ investigation into an allegation of human trafficking. The applicants, two Filipino nationals, who had gone to work as maids or au pairs [in] the United Arab Emirates, alleged that their employers had taken their passports away from them and exploited them. They claimed that this treatment had continued during a short stay in Vienna where their employers had taken them and where they had eventually managed to escape. Following a criminal complaint filed by the applicants against their employers in Austria, the authorities found that they did not have jurisdiction over the alleged offences...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

“J. and Others v. Austria (no. 58216/12) (17 January 2017): This case concerned the Austrian authorities’ investigation into an allegation of human trafficking. The applicants, two Filipino nationals, who had gone to work as maids or au pairs [in] the United Arab Emirates, alleged that their employers had taken their passports away from them and exploited them. They claimed that this treatment had continued during a short stay in Vienna where their employers had taken them and where they had eventually managed to escape. Following a criminal complaint filed by the applicants against their employers in Austria, the authorities found that they did not have jurisdiction over the alleged offences...more
Jan. 31, 2021, 3:04 p.m.
Countries: Australia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2, CWC-DATA-4

"CALD women experience higher levels of violence than the general population. CALD women are more likely to experience abuse by extended family members, abuse related to their immigration status, dowry demands and forced marriage. The family violence provisions in the Migration Regulations only protect some women from deportation if they leave a violent relationship. Women on certain temporary visas, including temporary work visas, business or student visas cannot access the family violence provisions and are thus subject to deportation if they leave a violent relationship. It is estimated that without intervention, the cost of violence perpetrated against immigrant and refugee women will reach $4 billion in 2021-22" (23). CALD stands...more
Jan. 18, 2021, 12:48 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Migrant domestic workers, predominantly women, faced a range of abuses including overwork, forced confinement, non-payment of wages, food deprivation, and psychological, physical, and sexual abuse for which there was little redress" (para 29).
Aug. 10, 2020, 5:50 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

“‘They were tricked into going to Mali by giving them the impression they were going to get jobs in hotels, for example,’ Okah-Donli told Al Jazeera. ‘Some were actually abducted while going to school.’ ‘There are over one million Nigerian residents in Mali, out of which about 20,000 are trapped into forced prostitution. The conditions are horrible. They are kept in the thick of the forest where they cannot escape and with the ‘madames’ watching over them’” (para 4-6).
Aug. 10, 2020, 5:49 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

“‘They were tricked into going to Mali by giving them the impression they were going to get jobs in hotels, for example,’ Okah-Donli told Al Jazeera. ‘Some were actually abducted while going to school.’ ‘There are over one million Nigerian residents in Mali, out of which about 20,000 are trapped into forced prostitution. The conditions are horrible. They are kept in the thick of the forest where they cannot escape and with the ‘madames’ watching over them’” (para 4-6).
Aug. 9, 2020, 12:54 p.m.
Countries: Singapore
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Foreign migrant workers are subject to labor rights abuses and exploitation through debts owed to recruitment agents, non-payment of wages, restrictions on movement, confiscation of passports, and sometimes physical and sexual abuse. Foreign women employed as domestic workers are particularly vulnerable to abuse. Work permits of migrant workers in Singapore are tied to a particular employer, leaving them vulnerable to exploitation. Foreign domestic workers, who are covered by the Employment of Foreign Manpower Act rather than the Employment Act, are effectively excluded from many key labor protections, such as limits on daily work hours and mandatory days off. Labor laws also discriminate against foreign workers by barring them from organizing...more
Aug. 7, 2020, 4:32 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Abuses included non-payment of wages, unsafe working conditions, long hours, document confiscation, and physical, verbal and sexual abuse" (para 16).
Aug. 2, 2020, 6:20 p.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The UAE's labor law excluded from its protections domestic workers, who faced a range of abuses, including unpaid wages, house confinement, workdays up to 21 hours, and physical and sexual assault by employers" (para 15).
Aug. 2, 2020, 5:17 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2, CWC-DATA-4

"Migrant domestic workers, predominantly women, faced a range of abuses including overwork, forced confinement, non-payment of wages, food deprivation, and psychological, physical, and sexual abuse for which there was little redress" (para 29).
June 19, 2020, 9:38 p.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Women from Asia and neighboring African countries were recruited for legitimate work in South Africa, where some were subjected to domestic servitude or forced labor in the service sector" (36).
May 15, 2020, 6:53 p.m.
Countries: France
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"There is a lack of systematically organized rehabilitation and reintegration measures, including access to counselling, medical treatment, psychological support and redress, including compensation, for victims of trafficking, in particular for migrant women, who are not entitled to obtain a temporary residence permit unless they cooperate with the police and judicial authorities" (10).
March 4, 2020, 10:53 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Mauritania . . . the place where [slavery] is arguably more common, more readily accepted and more intractable than anywhere else on Earth" (para 7). This article uses the term slavery to describe labor and domestic servants (MM-CODER COMMENT) "In Mauritania, the shackles of slavery are mental as well as physical" (para 20) "Moulkheir was born a slave in the northern deserts of Mauritania . . . She never was paid for her work. 'I was like an animal living with animals,' she said" (para 22). "Slave masters in Mauritania exercise full ownership over their slaves. They can send them away at will, and it’s common for a master to...more
Feb. 14, 2020, 12:34 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Foreign domestic workers, usually women, often suffered from mistreatment, abuse, and in some cases rape or conditions akin to slavery" (28).
Jan. 30, 2020, 1:05 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"In past years, multiple NGOs reported that criminal smuggling groups built a large number of 'camps' near the Yemen-Saudi border city of Haradh, where militants held migrants for extortion and ransom" (21). "Foreign migrant workers, youth, and female workers typically faced the most exploitative working conditions" (37).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Some domestic workers were believed to work under forced conditions or without pay. Women refugees were especially prone to labor violations." (pg 49).
Sept. 19, 2019, 8:35 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The woman are then subjected to domestic labour in the mornings and evenings, agricultural and other forms of manual labour during the days, and sexual intercourse with their husband and, on occasion, his male relatives, at night." (para 19).
July 31, 2019, 6:50 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The labor law and the law against trafficking provide penalties for abuse of such workers" implies prevelence of trafficking of migrant workers (AMG-CODER COMMENT). "During the year hundreds of domestic workers, the majority of whom were female, sought shelter at their embassies, some fleeing sexual abuse or other violence by their employers. Some embassies maintained safe houses for citizens fleeing situations that amounted to bondage. The workers usually sought legal help from embassies and government agencies to obtain end-of-service benefits and exit visas" (54).
July 17, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Singapore
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The Committee remains concerned that the State party continues to be a destination and transit country for trafficking in women and girls for purposes of sexual and labour exploitation" (6). "There are ongoing allegations that many women who are migrant domestic workers continue to be exploited and abused by their employers through actions that include non payment of salary, deprivation of food and adequate rest, confiscation of personal items, such as mobile phones and passports, restrictions on freedom of movement and refusal to pay medical expenses, as well as sexual, physical, verbal and psychological abuse" (9).
July 12, 2019, 8:51 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"The second Labour Migration Policy for Cambodia 2015–2018 sets out a framework for effective governance of labour migration, empowerment and protection of the rights of female and male migrant workers, and enhancement of the impact of migration on development. The MoLVT is developing guidelines for the identification and referrals of victims of human trafficking, and has established a Labour Migration Information System (LMIS) with support from partner organizations to collect sex and sector-disaggregated data on the number of Cambodian workers that migrate through regular channels" (17-18). "In 2016, Cambodian embassies in five destination countries intervened in 223 migrant worker cases and arranged for their safe return home to Cambodia. In...more