The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for MARR-LAW-5

Feb. 15, 2021, 9:45 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Another law prohibits marriages to foreigners where the age difference exceeds 25 years" (para 25).
Feb. 13, 2021, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCC-LAW-1, MARR-LAW-5

“Though most countries have committed to offer healthcare to COVID-affected persons regardless of status, the economic relief funds being distributed to households in many countries, including Jordan, will not be made available to the non-citizen members of women’s families. Women’s non-citizen spouses and adult children often lack access to formal employment, meaning affected families already faced significant financial insecurity pre-COVID. The economic fallout from the pandemic will hit these and other marginalized groups especially hard. . . Pre-COVID, a Jordanian mother was forced to provide for her entire family, as her husband and children lack citizenship and therefore access to formal employment due to the country’s discriminatory nationality law. Now...more
Feb. 4, 2021, 6:07 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, ATDW-PRACTICE-2, ATDW-LAW-5, ADCM-LAW-1, CUST-LAW-1

"In Syria, divorce is a frightening prospect for women. Although citizens have equal rights in civil law, family law and divorce falls within the realm of sharia. Men, but not women, can unilaterally divorce with only a verbal decree. If a woman divorces through court proceedings, she rarely gets alimony, and she loses custody of young children if she remarries" (para 33).
Jan. 1, 2021, 2:26 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Some religious leaders preach in support of early marriage, incorrectly teaching that it's against Islamic law for a girl to live with her parents after puberty" (para 8).
Dec. 20, 2020, 6:53 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Women of ethnic minority backgrounds are not included in the laws subjected to Muslim Bahraini women. Civil courts in Bahrain will consider cases of non-Muslim, or non-religious women basing their decisions on the laws and accepted rules of their religious traditions" (4).
Aug. 26, 2020, 2:33 p.m.
Countries: United Kingdom
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, DTCP-LAW-1

“Britain's top family judge, Master of the Rolls Sir Terence Etherton, said the English courts did not recognise [the] Sharia marriage [of Mr. Khan and Mrs. Akhter]…The couple, both of Pakistani heritage, chose to marry at a restaurant in Southall, west London, in a religious ceremony carried out by an imam with 150 family and friends as guests … Master of the Rolls Sir Terence Etherton, who considered the case with two other judges, said[,]…'The parties were not marrying 'under the provisions' of English law. The ceremony was not performed in a registered building. Moreover, no notice had been given to the superintendent registrar, no certificates had been issued, and...more
Aug. 26, 2020, 1:41 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-LAW-5

“Tunisia has abolished a decades-old ban on Muslim women marrying non-Muslims as the president seeks to secure equal rights for the country’s female population…Until now a non-Muslim man who wished to marry a Muslim Tunisian woman had to convert to Islam and submit a certificate of his conversion as proof while a Muslim Tunisian man is allowed to marry a non-Muslim woman” (para 1, 5).
Aug. 7, 2020, 4:32 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Marriages between Muslim women and non-Muslim men are not recognized" (para 17). "Article 9 of Jordan's nationality law does not allow Jordanian women married to non-Jordanian spouses to pass on their nationality to their spouse and children" (para 18).
June 9, 2020, 4:37 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"South Korea is to enact legislation that will ban men with a history of domestic violence from marrying foreign women, the justice ministry has confirmed" (para 1). "The amendment will prohibit South Korean men from inviting foreign women to the country for the purpose of marriage if they have a criminal record of domestic violence, irrespective of when that occurred. Anyone sentenced to a sexual crime against a child within the past 10 years, or who has received a jail term in the same time, will also be subject to the newly amended law" (para 3-4). "South Korea’s justice ministry said the legal revision to the country’s immigration control law...more
Feb. 14, 2020, 12:34 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"On October 6, the condition of valid residency for birth and marriage registration for PRS was waived, expanding the application of a previous circular issued on September 12 applicable to Syrians" (19).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-LAW-5

"Under Islamic law a Muslim man may marry a Jewish or Christian woman. A Muslim woman may not marry a non-Muslim man." (pg 18). "A Muslim woman cannot legally marry a non- Muslim man." (pg 43).
July 19, 2019, 12:46 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Media noted that official marriages only captured a fraction of underage marriages, since many such marriages were concluded as religious marriages only. A May 2015 Constitutional Court decision legalized the right to be religiously married without obtaining a civil marriage. On December 2, a law (colloquially known as the “mufti” marriage law) entered into force, allowing government-employed religious authorities (muftis) to perform and register marriages" (page 52).
July 17, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Singapore
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Under the Act, a woman may not marry without a wali (male next of kin)… A Muslim man may marry up to four women without the consent of his existing wives" (12).
July 11, 2019, 5:35 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The Committee welcomes… the adoption of the… Hindu Marriage Registration Act (2012), providing for the legal recognition of Hindu marriages" (1-2).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, ATDW-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-2

"Due to family pressure, young women, especially adolescent girls, often dropped out of school to marry. The law protects women’s rights in marriage and family matters, but families often pressured female minors to marry against their will. Religious marriages were common substitutes for civil marriages, due to the high marriage registration fees associated with civil marriages and the power afforded men under religious law. In cases of religious marriages not registered with the government, husbands simply repeated a phrase in front of two witnesses to divorce their wives. Husbands also used these officially unregistered religious marriages to prevent wives from accessing family assets and other rights in the event of...more
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"A Muslim woman cannot legally marry a non-Muslim unless he converts to Islam. This prohibition usually was neither observed nor enforced among certain populations" (Pg 66).
July 1, 2019, 6:31 p.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Girls who married under the terms of religious marriage contracts were of particular concern, since these were not subject to government oversight and do not entitle the wife to recognition of her status in case of divorce" (p. 30).
July 1, 2019, 6:30 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The law prohibits Muslim women from marrying nonMuslims, although authorities did not always enforce this provision" (p. 27).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-5

"On September 14, the government cancelled the 1973 decree law that prevented the marriage of Muslim female citizens with non-Muslim men unless the men presented proof of conversion to Islam. Sharia requires men, but not women, to provide for their families. Because of this expectation, in some instances sharia inheritance law provides men with a larger share of an inheritance" (p. 23).
June 25, 2019, 8:40 p.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The 1984 Kuwaiti Family Law Code prohibits marriage between Muslim women and non-Muslim men. The law does not require a non-Muslim woman to convert to Islam to marry a Muslim man, but many non-Muslim women faced strong economic and societal pressure to convert" (p. 21).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The law prohibits discriminatory practices against women married under civil law, but women married under customary law face legal and cultural discrimination" (Pg 15).
June 3, 2019, 10:15 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Marriage in Nigeria takes place under three legal systems: Islamic (Maliki school of law), civil (statutory law), and customary (tribal/traditional law). In general, marriages in the north of the country are legislated under Islamic law, while those in the south fall under statutory law. However, even when couples marry under statutory law, customary laws generally prevail in personal matters. In most customary law systems in Nigeria, there is no minimum age for marriage" (Pg 29).
May 28, 2019, 5:40 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Some local interpretations of sharia prohibit a Muslim woman from marrying a non-Muslim man, others permit marrying a Christian or Jewish man. All interpretations allow a Muslim man to marry a Christian or Jewish woman" (38).
May 10, 2019, 3:08 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, AOM-LAW-1

"In the Philippines, the legal age of marriage is 18 years, although marriage before this age is permitted among the indigenous peoples and among Muslims" (48).
April 30, 2019, 5:44 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Since September 2017, Tunisian women are free to marry non-Muslims. President Beji Caid Essebsi repealed a circular dated to 1973, inspired by the country's Muslim traditions that previously required non-Muslim men to convert to Islam in order to marry a Muslim woman. Only then the country's Mufti would allow the marriage to take place." (para 2). ""The whole problem was that we couldn't find in Hammamet a notary who was willing to marry us," Zeineb said recalling the first three notaries she approached who refused to validate the marriage." (para 5). "Two motivated their rejection saying that allowing such marriage was against their principles, the third said that the municipality...more
April 22, 2019, 7:33 a.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: MARR-LAW-2, MARR-LAW-5

"Local interpretation of sharia prohibits Muslim women from marrying nonMuslims and Muslim men from marrying women “not of the book,” generally meaning adherents of religions other than Islam, Christianity, and Judaism" (p. 11).
April 10, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-4, MARR-LAW-5

"The country lacks a civil marriage law. In order to be considered legal, civil marriages, marriages of some non-Orthodox Jews, marriages in non-Orthodox ceremonies, same-sex marriages, marriages of a Jew to a non-Jew, or marriages of a Muslim woman to a non-Muslim must take place outside the country to be considered legal, because religious courts refuse to conduct these marriages" (17).
April 9, 2019, 12:57 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"There were barriers to marriage between citizens and displaced Afghans. Authorities required Afghans to obtain documentation from their embassy or government offices in Afghanistan to register their marriage in the country, according to media reporting. The law states, 'Any foreigner who marries an Iranian woman without the permission of the Iranian government will be sentenced to two to five years in prison plus a cash penalty'" (27).
March 5, 2019, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Malaysia
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The government does not recognize marriages between Muslims and non-Muslims and considers children born of such marriages illegitimate" (9).
March 1, 2019, 11:52 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"If any one of the requirements for the validity of a marriage is not present, or the conditions provided for in the guidelines and provisions for marriage under the sharia and the law are not fulfilled – such as that one of the parties to the marriage forced the other, or was forced to act against his or her will, or was subject to any means of material or psychological compulsion from either the spouse or the guardian – then the party that acted under duress or a victim of a forced marriage may request annulment of the marriage contract. Compulsion with respect to the marriage contract renders the consent...more