The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for WR-PRACTICE-1

Feb. 10, 2021, 1:09 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"'A child widow's job is to repent and atone. They live a life virtually devoid of pleasure and must wear no other color but white. They must eschew jewelry, meat, fish, and social gatherings, even with family. Temples are off limits and they are not allowed to remarry. They must not leave the house or look men in the eye, as it is said that a widows gaze will bring bad luck,' Basu added" (para 10).
Dec. 31, 2020, 4:53 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"A landmark consensus agreed by Islamic scholars (Ulema) regarding the waiting period for ‘half-widows’ to remarry in four years will have an unprecedented impact on the lives of Kashmir’s forgotten survivors. Decades of conflict have produced many half-widows, women whose husbands have disappeared but are not yet declared deceased. Since most of the disappeared men are from rural Kashmir, these widows usually live impoverished lives often facing various socio-economic and emotional uncertainties such as lack of property rights, right to compensation and the right to remarry. The joint agreement means that the wives of Kashmiri men who have disappeared during the Kashmir conflict are allowed to remarry four years after...more
Sept. 26, 2020, 6:47 p.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Kuwaiti personal status law, which applies to Sunni Muslims who make up the majority of Kuwaitis, discriminates against women [ . . . ] women can lose custody of their children if they remarry someone outside the former husband’s family" (para 17).
May 29, 2020, 12:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Women who flee violent relationships don't necessarily want to marry again. Neither do widows who are often pressured to wed a brother of their husband so that their children have a male guardian" (para 5). "That decision [not to remarry] makes them among Afghan society's most vulnerable. Many are disowned by their families. They may be harassed or abused. And with 60 percent of the country unemployed, every woman must find a way to support her children" (para 6).
April 24, 2020, 9:56 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"The next day, Rose says she was taken to a village gathering, where she was asked to marry one of her husband's siblings or another man from the community." (para 23). "They said I should choose a husband in replacement of my late husband. I was shocked ... one of the men said I could choose my son and I did, but most of them were not happy with that option,' she says, her gaze fixed on her husband's photograph as she recounted the ordeal." (para 24).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:17 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"A Maharashtra state government order issued this week said the widows would also receive assistance with their children's education, and access to welfare benefits such as the rural jobs scheme" (para. 2). "Widows often face difficulty in claiming their husband's property and in receiving government compensation and other benefits, human rights activists said. 'The land does not get automatically transferred to the widow. It is often the husband's male relatives who will take it,' said Nirja Bhatnagar, a regional head at advocacy group ActionAid India. 'Woman are not even recognised as farmers. So having the land title in their name is crucial to enable them to take bank loans and...more
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:17 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"A Maharashtra state government order issued this week said the widows would also receive assistance with their children's education, and access to welfare benefits such as the rural jobs scheme" (para. 2). "Widows often face difficulty in claiming their husband's property and in receiving government compensation and other benefits, human rights activists said. 'The land does not get automatically transferred to the widow. It is often the husband's male relatives who will take it,' said Nirja Bhatnagar, a regional head at advocacy group ActionAid India. 'Woman are not even recognised as farmers. So having the land title in their name is crucial to enable them to take bank loans and...more
Oct. 22, 2019, 1:55 p.m.
Countries: Equatorial Guinea
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7, MARR-PRACTICE-8, WR-PRACTICE-1, PW-PRACTICE-3

"Although not widespread, levirate marriage, the practice by which a man is required to marry his brother’s widow, occurred" (20).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, IW-PRACTICE-1

"Widows were sometimes forcibly married to one of the deceased husband’s relatives to secure continued use of property left by the husband, including the marital home. To protect women, including widows, better, the government included provisions in the 2016 penal code addressing the eviction of one spouse from the marital home by any person other than the other spouse" (Pg 26).
June 10, 2019, 8:03 a.m.
Countries: East Timor
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Some communities also continued the practice of forcing a widow to either marry one of her husband’s family members or, if she and her husband did not have children together, leave her husband’s home" (p. 14).
March 18, 2019, 9:18 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SMES-DATA-2, WR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-2

In Afghanistan, "Widows cannot work, like most women in traditional areas, and any inheritance or property would go to her husband’s brothers, not to his widow or children."
March 1, 2019, 9:06 a.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Women were most likely to have seen a family planning message on television (45%). Eighteen percent had read a family planning message in a newspaper or magazine, and 12% heard a message on the radio. Nine percent of women were exposed to a family planning message through the Caravan of Health or the Program on Methods of Contraception. Very few women were exposed to family planning messages through mobile phones (2%). Almost half of women (49%) had no exposure to family planning messages through any of the five sources" (85).
Sept. 26, 2018, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Eritrea
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, WR-LAW-1

"According to the 'period of widowhood' principle a woman is not allowed to remarry unless three hundred and six days have elapsed since the dissoluion of a previous marriage by death of her husband. However, if a woman does so, such a marriage cannot be invalidated on this ground alone" (4).
Sept. 24, 2018, 10:50 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: SMES-DATA-2, WR-PRACTICE-1

"The UN reported that displaced women, widows, and female-headed households were particularly vulnerable to abuse" (para 253)
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:25 a.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"The practice of “purification,” whereby a widow is obligated to have unprotected sex with a member of her deceased husband’s family, continued, particularly in rural areas, despite a number of campaigns against it" (15).
June 9, 2018, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee...remains concerned, however, about the persistence of...harmful practices, such as...widowhood rites such as widow inheritance" (5)
June 3, 2018, 6:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1, MARR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-1

"Widows are often rejected as immoral or regarded as burdens: they suffer violence, expulsion, ostracism and sometimes forced remarriage, often with a brother-in-law, as reported by the UN Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) in a rare study published in 2014," (1).
Feb. 14, 2018, 11:45 a.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"A woman whose husband dies does not received upkeep during the waiting period whether she is pregnant or not. The same is the case for the Christian communities" (68).
Dec. 15, 2017, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Zimbabwe
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1

"Activist, firebrand and feminist are just a few of the terms used to describe Priscilla Misihairabwi-Mushonga, a former opposition MP and cabinet minister in Zimbabwe. No one would call her a pushover. Yet despite her connections and some of the country’s finest lawyers arguing her case, after her husband’s death she was forced empty-handed out of her matrimonial home of 13 years. Before Ms Misihairabwi-Mushonga was widowed she and her late husband owned three houses, including one in the leafy suburb of Mt Pleasant in the north of Harare. They shared bank accounts and owned several cars. Some of this was left to her in a will. Yet after her...more
Dec. 15, 2017, 10:34 a.m.
Countries: Zimbabwe
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"It is not only the government that grabs other people’s stuff in Zimbabwe. In-laws do it, too. Tens of thousands of widows are stripped of their property after the death of their husbands. A report released this week by Human Rights Watch (HRW), an outfit based in New York, documents numerous cases of Zimbabwean widows losing their homes, the land that they had tended for years and even the fruit growing on their trees. Such abuses are common in many countries, HRW says. The Loomba Foundation, another NGO, estimates that 38m widows are extremely poor. . . . The country has an alarming number of widows: more than half of...more
Dec. 13, 2017, 4:23 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"A member of Iraq’s parliament has put forward a proposal to legalise polygamy in the country to 'protect the dignity' of widows, divorced women, and older women who choose not to marry" (para 1). From this quote, it appears that women have a right to choose not to remarry if they do not wish to do so (AA-CODER COMMENT).
Oct. 30, 2017, 3:24 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Customary marriage in Egypt does not only affect girls. Women, widows and divorcees are also married this way through offices set up specifically to introduce them to potential husbands. Amira Hassan, the manager of Al-Hayat Company for Social Harmony, a matchmaking company, said this type of marriage is very common due to the prevailing social conditions and the requirements of an official marriage, such as paying an officiant, the Ministry of Religious Endowments and the relevant state authorities, namely the Ministry of Justice, as well as paying expenses related to supporting the wife. 'Unofficial marriage contracts only require the consent of both parties, without adding other conditions,' she said" (para...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"When a woman in Nepal loses her husband, she often wears white clothes. The culture also requires widows to shun merriment and live in virtual seclusion"(para 1)."Often forced into virtual seclusion , they [widows] are not supposed to remarry or move out of their in-laws’ homes, which leaves many open to exploitation"(para 20)."In 2008, in recognition of the large number of war widows and popular aversion to widow remarriage, the government put forward a scheme to pay men a 50,000 rupee ($460) incentive to marry widows.But widows protested, saying the proposal was open to abuse by traffickers and would turn them into commodities. Nepal’s Supreme Court ordered the government to...more
Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Three years [after the death of her husband], she met Mohammad Ali. 'He asked to marry me and said he would take care of my children'" (para 16).
June 8, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-3

"Wesal [it means communion or reunion in Arabic — a first-of-its-kind matchmaking website in Gaza] not only facilitates marriages for widows, but also for the divorced and those who have never married" (p 15)
June 8, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-2

"on Wesal — it means communion or reunion in Arabic — a first-of-its-kind matchmaking website in Gaza. It has been successful, and not just because Tinder and other dating apps are banned or severely frowned on here. Its founder knows his demographic well: residents of the religiously conservative Gaza Strip, with its culture of resistance. Some 1,400 men have been killed in the three wars with Israel since 2008, leaving many widows who would like to remarry. Tradition, however, can make it difficult for them to wed single men" (p 5-6)
June 8, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"‘Women who lost their men during the last three wars have difficult lives and few options,’ said Reham Owda, a Gaza-based writer and analyst of women’s issues. ‘In most cases the husband’s family pressures the woman to marry the brother in law to control her life and seize any financial aid she receives.’ Ms. Owda added that if the widow’s husband is affiliated with a political party, it might intervene and pressure the woman to marry a man from the same group, and she will often agree because she is struggling financially and the group will pay her a salary" (p 12-13)
June 6, 2017, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Aruna Kanthi Athauda was married to a soldier in the Sri Lankan army. Since his death, she receives a monthly pension. Aruna lives on a compound with her husband’s family. Many widows like her won’t remarry, because they would lose half the money they receive" (1). This is a quote from the narrator at 11:25 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "'Often in remarriages you inherit your new husband’s children and it causes your own children to think they will be forgotten. I don’t want to put my children in that situation. That’s why I will never remarry'" (1). This is a quote from a war widow at 12:42 (TPJ - CODER...more
March 28, 2017, 1:47 p.m.
Countries: Guinea-Bissau
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, IW-PRACTICE-1

"Widows are required to marry the brothers of their late husbands so that they can remain in the same household group and ensure that their chil-dren are being provided for" (526).
Feb. 9, 2017, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, IW-PRACTICE-1

"When Clarisse's husband died of malaria last year in the Cameroonian city of Douala, she was kicked out of their home by his family and forced to marry his brother" (para 1).